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ERGRADUATE CATALOG 2002-2004 




We Make Tomorrow 



UNIVERSITY OF 

NEW HAVEN 



INFORMATION DIRECTORY 



President 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7276 

Executive Vice President 
& Provost 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7267 

Academic Services Office 

Maxcy Hall 

Admissions, Undergraduate 

Bayer Hall 
203-932-7319 

Admissions, International 

Bayer Hall 
203-932-7321 

Admissions, Graduate 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7133 

Alumni Office 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7270 

Athletic Department 

Charger Gymnasium 
203-932-7017 

Business Office 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7218 

Career Development 

Kaplan Hall 
203-932-7342 

Center for Learning 
Resources 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7214 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7256 

Disability Services 
& Resources 

Sheffield Hall 
VOICE/TDD; 203-932-7331 

Financial Aid 

Bayer Hall 
203-932-7315 

Graduate Studies 

Maxcy Hall 
203-932-7095 

Health Services 

Sheffield Hall 

International Student 
Services 

Student Center 

M.K. Peterson Library 

203-932-7195 

Multicultural Affairs 

Student Center 

Registrar, Undergraduate 

South Campus Hall 
203-932-7301 

Registrar, Graduate 

South Campus Hall 
203-932-7309 



Residential Life 

Bixler Hall 

School of Business 

Bethel Hall 
203-932-7115 

School of Engineering 
& Applied Science 

Buckman Hall 
203-932-7168 

Tagliatela School of 
Hospitality and Tourism 

Harugari Hall 

School of Public Safety 
& Professional Studies 

South Campus Hall 

Student Activities 

Student Center 
203-932-7430 

UNH Southeastern 

New London, CT 
(860) 701-5454 

Veterans Affairs 

South Campus Hall 
203-932-7388 

Vice President for Student 
Affairs 

Student Center 
203-932-7199 



Call toll free 1-800-DIAL-UNH and ask for the four-digit extension required, or contact us on the 

web at: www.newhaven.edu 



^ 




UNIVERSITY OF 

NEW HAVEN 

UNDERGRADUATE 
CATALOG 
2002-2004 

300 Orange Avenue 

West Haven, CT 06516 

(203) 932-7000 

Undergraduate Admissions: (203) 932-7319 
or Toil-Free: 1-800-DIAL-UNH 

Fax: (203) 931-6093 

E-mail: adminfo@newhaven.edu 

Financial Aid: (203) 932-7315 

Disability Services (Voice/TDD): (203) 932-7331 

Health Services Office: (203) 932-7079 

Health Services Fax: (203) 931-6090 



Website: www.newhaven.edu 



This catalog supersedes all previous bulletins, cata- to the university's equal opportunity/affirmative action 

logs and brochures published by the University of New officer at 300 Orange Avenue, West Haven, CT 

Haven and describes academic programs to be offered 06516; phone (203)932-7265. Persons who have spe- 

beginning in Fall 2002. Undergraduate students cial needs requiring accommodation should notify the 

admitted to the university for the Fall 2002 and there- Director of Disability Services and Resources at 300 

after are bound by the regulations published in this Orange Avenue, West Haven, CT 06516 or by 

catalog. Those admitted prior to Fall 2002 are bound Voice/TDD at (203)932-7331. 

by those new regulations which have been duly insti- ^^^^ effort has been made to ensure that the infor- 

tuted and announced prior to the semester during ^^^.j^n contained in this publication is accurate and 

which they are effective. ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^f ^^e date of publication; however, the uni- 

The University of New Haven is committed to versity cannot be held responsible for typographical 

affirmative action and to a policy which provides for errors or omissions that may have occurred, 
equal opportunity in employment, advancement, 
admission, educational opportunity and administra- 
tion of financial aid to all persons on the basis of indi- 
vidual merit. This policy is administered without 
regard to race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, 

gender, religion, sexual orientation or disabilities not Volume XXV, No. 9, June 2002 

related to performance. It is the policy of the University of New Haven is published nine times per 

University of New Haven not to discriminate on the year, in February, April (2), May (2), June, July, and 

basis of gender in its admission, educational pro- November (2), by the University of New Haven, 300 

grams, activities or employment policies as required Orange Avenue, West Haven, CT 06516. 
by Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments. 

This school is authorized under federal law to enroll postage paid at New Haven, CX publication number 

nonimmigrant alien students. USPS 423-4 1 0. Postmaster: Please send form 3579 to 

Inquiries regarding nondiscrimination, affirmative Office of Public Relations, University of New Haven, 

action, equal opportunity and Tide IX may be directed RO. Box 9605, New Haven, CT 06535-0605. 



The university reserves the right, at any time, to make whatever changes may be deemed necessary in 
admission requirements, fees, charges, tuition, policies, regulations and academic pro-ams prior to 
the start of any class, term, semester, trimester or session. All such changes are effective at such times as 
the proper authorities determine and may apply not only to prospective students but also to those who 
already are enrolled in the university. 



Dear Student, 

This catalog provides more than just a 
formal document describing and defining 
the academic programs and policies for 
undergraduate students at the University of 
New^ Haven (UNH), As you examine this 
information, you will become aware of the 
breadth and diversity of our educational 
programs and recognize the extraordinary 
opportunities they offer. It is my hope 
that you will find a field of study intriguing 
to you for personal interest, intellectual 
curiosity, career potential, along with 
professional and educational growth. 

At UNH you will find a friendly and 
caring atmosphere as well as faculty who are 
accomplished scholars with excellent academic credentials. Qualified faculty teach all of our 
courses; none are taught by teaching assistants. Our professors also work closely with students 
outside of class as well, serving as mentors and academic counselors. They participate fully in 
our extensive advising process, and they coordinate with our Center for Learning Resources, 
which offers a variety of academic support services. Many of our faculty also have professional, 
real-world experiences that contribute to students' development for meaningful, rewarding 
and productive careers. 

Convenient class scheduling and accelerated learning programs in some fields provide 
access to learning for both full-time and part-time students. A wide range of support services 
such as the library, computer facilities, science and engineering laboratories, cooperative 
employment and internship opportunities, and financial aid enhance the academic 
atmosphere while numerous social, cultural and athletic activities are available at UNH and 
in Greater New Haven. 

Welcome to UNH. Our goal is to make your tomorrow! 




Sincerely, 

Lawrence J. DeNardis 
President 



tUIV;^^cJ. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/universityof20022004univ 



CONTENTS 

Programs of Study 6 

The University 8 

Schools of the University 10 

Degrees Offered by the University 12 

University Curricula 15 

University Core Curriculum 15 

Academic Advising 17 

The Honors Program 17 

Developmental Studies Program 18 

Freshman Year Program 19 

The University Community 20 

Academic Services 20 

Student Services 20 

Student Activities 24 

Campus Facilities 27 

Research and Professional Facilities 29 

Admission and Registration 31 

Full-Time Admissions 31 

Part-Time Admissions 33 

FuU-Time, Part-Time Registration 34 

UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 36 

Academic Regulations 38 

Tuition, Fees and Expenses 50 

Financial Aid 55 

College of Arts and Sciences 61 

School of Business 93 

School of Engineering and Applied Science . . .105 
Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism . .130 
School of Public Safety and Professional Studies . 1 38 

Courses 1 56 

Course Descriptions 157 

Board, Administration and Faculty 242 

Academic Calendar 274 

Index 280 

Campus Map Inside Back Cover 



Undergraduate 
Programs of Study 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree Programs 

Art, B.A 85 

Biology, B.S 65 

General Biology. 66 

Biochemistry 66 

Premedical/Predental/Preveterinary 65 

Biotechnology, B.S 67 

Chemistry, B.A 69 

Communication, B.A 70 

Dental Hygiene, A.S., B.S 72 

English, B.A 76 

Literature 76 

Writing 76 

Environmental Science, B.S 67 

General Dietetics, B.S 73 

General Studies, A.S 64 

Graphic Design, A.S 87 

Graphic Design, B.A 86 

History, B.A 77 

Interior Design, A.S 87 

Interior Design, B.A 86 

Prearchitecture 87 

Liberal Studies, B.A 63 

Marine Biology, B.S 68 

Mathematics, B.A., B.S 78 

Computer Science 79 

Natural Sciences 79 

Statistics 79 

Music, B.A 90 

Music Industry, B.A 90 

Music and Sound Recording, B.A 91 



Music and Sound Recording, B.S 91 

Political Science, B.A 81 

Psychology, B.A 83 

Community-Clinical 84 

General 84 

Certificates 

Art 88 

Graphic Design 88 

Interior Design 88 

Journalism 71 

Public Policy 82 

School of Business 

Degree Programs 

Accounting, B.S 95 

Business Administration, A.S 101 

Business Administration, B.S 101 

Management of Sports Industries 100 

Business Economics, B.S .98 

Communication, A.S 97 

Communication, B.S 97 

Finance, B.S 99- 

International Business, B.S 103 

Management of Sports Industries, B.S 100 

Marketing and Electronic Commerce, B.S. . .102 

Certificate 

Mass Communication 97 

School of Engineering and 
Applied Science 

Degree Programs 

Chemical Engineering, A.S 112 

Chemical Engineering, B.S Ill 

Chemistry, A.S 114 

Chemistry, B.S 113 

Civil Engineering, A.S 116 



Civil Engineering, B.S 

Computer Engineering, B.S 

Computer Science, A.S 

Computer Science, B.S 

Electrical Engineering, A.S 

Electrical Engineering, B.S 

General Engineering, B.S 

Industrial Engineering, A.S 

Industrial Engineering, B.S 

Mechanical Engineering, A.S 

Mechanical Engineering, B.S 

Certificate 

Logistics 126 

Tagliatela School of 

Hospitality and Tourism 



.115 
.122 
.118 
.117 
.121 
.120 
.108 
.126 
.124 
.129 
.128 



Degree Programs 

Hotel and Restaurant Management, A.S 
Hotel and Restaurant Management, B.S 

Tourism Concentration 

Private Club Management, B.S. . . 

Tourism Administration, A.S 

Tourism Administration, B.S. . . . 
Culinary Arts and Gastronomy, A.S 
Culinary Arts and Gastronomy, B.S 

Certificates 

Hotel and Restaurant Management. 
Culinary Arts and Gastronomy . . . 



.133 
,133 
.133 
.134 
.136 
.135 
.137 
.137 

.133 
.135 



School of Public Safety and 
Professional Studies 

Degree Programs 

Air Transportation Management, B.S. . 

Aviation Science, A.S 

Criminal Justice, A.S 

Criminal Justice, B.S 

Corrections 



.148 
,148 
.142 
.140 
.140 



Investigative Services 141 

Juvenile and Family Justice 141 

Law Enforcement Administration 141 

Private Security 1 4 1 

Research and Program Evaluation 142 

Victim Services Administration 1 42 

Fire and Occupational Safety, A.S 151 

Fire Science, B.S 149 

Fire/ Arson Investigation 149 

Fire Administration 150 

Fire Science Technology 1 50 

Fire Protection Engineering, B.S 151 

Forensic Science, B.S 142 

Legal Studies, A.S 146 

Legal Studies, B.S 144 

Dispute Resolution 146 

Legal Assistance 145 

Public Affairs 146 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 

A.S 154 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 

B.S 153 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Technology, A.S 155 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Technology, B.S 154 

Certificates 

Fire/Arson Investigation 152 

Fire Prevention 1 52 

Forensic Computer Investigation 144 

Hazardous Materials 153 

Industrial Fire Protection 152 

Information Protection and Security 144 

Law Enforcement Science 143 

Occupational Safety and Health 155 

Paralegal Studies 147 

Private Security . . .143 

Victim Services 143 



THE UNIVERSITY 



r^ 



UNIVERSITY OF 

NEW HAVEN 



We Make Tomorrow . . . 

At the University of New Haven, we hold a passionate dedication to the profes- 
sional juture of our students and make a caring commitment to their achievement. 

We provide the people, the programs, and the places that enable our students to 
prepare for personal success — in their careers, and in life. 



The University of New Haven is a private, inde- 
pendent, comprehensive university based in southern 
New England, speciaUzing in quality educational 
opportunities and preparation of both traditional and 
returning students for successful careers and self- 
reliant, productive service in a global society. 

Our Mission 

To develop career-ready and cultivated graduates, 
well-prepared for meaningful roles and the pursuit of 
life-long learning in a global economy and society. 



Our Vision 

To be the institution of choice for students who 
seek the highest quality education for professionally 
oriented careers. We will be noted for our ability to 
combine professional education with liberal arts and 
sciences, and with the development of high ethical and 
cultural standards among our graduates. 



Our Guiding Principles 

UNH is committed to educational innovation, to 
continuous improvement in career and professional 
education, and to support for scholarship and profes- 
sional development. 

UNH takes pride in, and models itself by, the 
standard of best practices in its commitment to serv- 
ice, quality, integrity and personal caring. All aca- 
demic programs, as well as campus and student life, 
provide rich opportunities for leadership, personal 
growth and participation in the aesthetics of life so 
that the University of New Haven will personify a 



successful commitment to diversity, equality and the 
"pursuit of happiness." 

Our goal is to distinguish ourselves by the measures 
of student admissions, retention, career development, 
collaboration with business, industry and community, 
and by the success of our graduates and their support 
as alumni. 

Our Values 

Belief in and practice of UNH's Mission 
and Vision 

Commitment to the success of our students 
through caring and responsive service 

Teamwork: help each other succeed and seek help 

Communications: be trusting, open, honest 
and straightforward 

Commitment to thoughtful action 

Think, articulate, do and evaluate 

Lead by example with continuous improvement 

Face all issues, no surprises, and be accountable 

Respect for the individual, including his or her 
thoughtful input 

Recognize success 

How We Will Be Known 

Excellence in career professions 

Currency in information technology and 
knowledge management 

Exceptional faculty, talented students, 
and accomplished alumni 
Mentored and engaged learning 
Cultural awareness in a global society 



The University 9 



• Community, business and professional partnerships 

• Ideal size and presence 

• Student satisfaction 

The hallmark of a UNH education is quality edu- 
cational opportunities at all post-secondary levels, 
through career-oriented academic programs with a 
strong liberal arts foundation, taught by a caring and 
highly qualified faculty in safe, convenient and diverse 
campus environments. 

A solid core curriculum of liberal, humanistic 
coursework is balanced with professional programs in 
business, engineering, computer science, public safety 
and other advanced technical areas. 

Moreover, the university is flexible enough to meet 
the needs of students who work while they attend 
UNH. A range of programs for part-time study are 
offered at night. A cooperative education program 
makes it possible for students to alternate semesters of 
class attendance with related work experience. 

The Graduate School offers students the opportu- 
nity to continue study beyond the bachelor's degree on 
a part-time or full-time basis. 

By responding to the educational needs of our stu- 
dents, the University of New Haven has become a 
major regional university serving both our students 
and the business community. 

Accreditation 

The University of New Haven is a coeducational, 
nonsectarian, independent institution of higher learn- 
ing chartered by the General Assembly of the State of 
Connecticut. 

The University of New Haven is accredited by the 
New England Association of Schools and Colleges, 
Inc., a nongovernmental, nationally recognized organ- 
ization whose affiliated institutions include elementary 
schools through collegiate institutions offering post- 
graduate instruction. 

Accreditation of an institution by the New 
England Association indicates that it meets or 
exceeds criteria tor the assessment of institutional 
quality periodically applied through a peer group 
review process. An accredited school or college is one 
which has available the necessary resources to 
achieve its stated mission through appropriate edu- 



cational programs, is substantially doing so, and 
gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do 
so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is 
also addressed through accreditation. 

Accreditation by the New England Association is 
not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As 
such, it is not a guarantee of the quality of every course 
or program offered, or the competence of individual 
graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance 
about the quality of opportunities available to students 
who attend the institution. 

The UNH School of Business has been admitted to 
candidacy status for accreditation by the American 
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. 
Candidacy status is an indication that an institution 
has voluntarily committed to participate in a system- 
atic program of quality enhancement and continuous 
improvement that makes AACSB accreditation a more 
realistic and operational objective. Candidacy is not 
accreditation and does not guarantee eventual accred- 
itation. 

The University of New Haven's curricula leading to 
the bachelor's degrees in chemical, civil, electrical, indus- 
trial and mechanical engineering are fully accredited by 
the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(EAC/ABET). The Computer Science bachelor's degree 
program is fully accredited by the Computing 
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board 
for Engineering and Technology (CAC/ABET). 

The university holds membership in the Academy of 
Criminal Justice Sciences, the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology, the American Council on 
Education, the Association of American Colleges, the 
National Association of Independent Colleges and 
Universities, the National Association of Schools of 
Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), the 
National Association of Boards of Examiners for 
Nursing Home Administration, the College Entrance 
Examination Board, the Council of Graduate Schools, 
the Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools and is 
a member of other regional and national professional 
organizations. 

Individual programs, departments and schools hold 
various forms of national, professional accreditations 
which are listed under relevant sections of the catalog. 



10 



History 

The University of New Haven was founded in 1920 
as the New Haven YMCA Junior College, a division of 
Northeastern University. The college became New 
Haven College in 1926 by an act of the Connecticut 
General Assembly. For nearly 40 years, the college held 
classes in space rented from Yale University. 

In September 1958, the college completed con- 
struction of a classroom building on Cold Spring 
Street, New Haven, for its daytime engineering pro- 
grams. That same year, the college received authoriza- 
tion from the Connecticut legislature to offer the 
bachelor of science degree in the fields of business, 
accounting, management and industrial engineering. 

Although the student body on the new Cold 
Spring Street campus numbered fewer than 200 per- 
sons, the college's facilities were fast becoming over- 
crowded. To meet the needs of the college and the 
local community, the Board of Governors pur- 
chased, in 1960, three buildings and 25 acres of land 
in West Haven, formerly belonging to the New 
Haven County Orphanage. 

The combination of increased classroom space and 
the four-year degree programs sparked a period of 
tremendous growth in enrollment and facilities. In 1961, 
the year after the college moved to West Haven, the 
graduating class numbered 75. Thirty-seven years later 
the figure has climbed to 1,100 graduates annually. 

New Haven College received full accreditation for 
its baccalaureate programs from the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges in 1966. In 1969, 
the college took a major step forward with the addi- 
tion of the Graduate School. Initially offering pro- 
grams in business administration and industrial engi- 
neering, the Graduate School expanded rapidly. 
Today, 30 master's programs, along with a wide vari- 
ety of graduate certificates, offer the approximately 
1,900 graduate students many choices for post-bacca- 
laureate study. 

On the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the 
college, in 1970, New Haven College became the 
University of New Haven, reflecting the increased 
scope and the diversity of academic programs offered. 
Today, the university offers more than 70 undergradu- 
ate and 30 graduate degree programs in six schools: the 



College of Arts and Sciences; the School of Business; 
the School of Engineering and Applied Science; the 
Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism; the 
School of Public Safety and Professional Studies; and 
the Graduate School. 

Undergraduate and graduate courses and programs 
are offered on the main campus in West Haven as well 
as in New London and at other ofi^-campus and in-plant 
sites. Graduate courses in selected fields are offered in 
New London, Stamford and Newington. The graduate 
forensic science, fire science and human nutrition pro- 
grams are offered at satellite locations in California. 



Philosophy 

The University of New Haven, a private, compre- 
hensive, multi-campus university based in southern 
New England, provides quality educational opportu- 
nities and preparation for self-reliant, productive, eth- 
ical service in a global society 

Since 1920 when the school was founded, the 
University of New Haven has been an innovator in 
providing quality educational opportunities with spe- 
cial emphasis on programs addressing current and 
emerging needs in society. 

Building on its successful past, the university will 
strive to achieve prominent and distinctive leadership 
as an institution that empowers students with substan- 
tive knowledge, ability to communicate, problem- 
solving skills and the practical experience appropriate 
for success as leaders in their professions and as citizens 
of the local and world communities. 

The university is committed to participatory gover- 
nance and quality management through continuous 
improvement to achieve its goals and perform its pri- 
mary service — successful student and faculty growth 
and learning. 

Schools of the University 



College of Arts and Sciences 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers associate 



The University 1 1 



degree programs in five academic fields and bachelor's 
degrees in more than 20 fields from art to psychology. 
School certificates offer specialized instruction to stu- 
dents interested in a concentrated exposure to one sub- 
ject area, in fields such as journalism, paralegal studies 
and graphic design. 

Through the Graduate School, the College of Arts 
and Sciences also offers master's degree programs as 
well as graduate-level certificates. Detailed informa- 
tion on the graduate programs is available in the 
Graduate School catalog. 

School of Business 

The School of Business offers programs in the fields 
of business administration, accounting, communica- 
tion, marketing, business economics, finance, interna- 
tional business and sports management. 

Through the Graduate School, the School of 
Business offers the M.B.A. and several master's degree 
programs as well as a number of business-related grad- 
uate certificates. 



School of Engineering 
and Applied Science 

The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers 
degree programs in nine fields: chemistty, chemical engi- 
neering, civil engineering, computer engineering, com- 
puter science, electrical engineering, general engineering, 
industrial engineering and mechanical engineering. 

Master of science degree programs and graduate 
certificates are offered through the Graduate School in 
several engineering fields. Students should consult the 
Graduate School catalog for more details. 

Tagliatela School of 
Hospitality and Tourism 

The Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism 
offers undergraduate degrees in four areas: Hotel and 
Restaurant Management, Private Club Management, 
Tourism Administration, and Gastronomy and 
Culinary Arts. 



The school is dedicated to academic excellence 
through study, teaching and research in the fields of 
hospitality within a global framework. 

A master of science degree in tourism and hospital- 
ity management is offered through the Graduate 
School. Students should contact the Graduate School 
for more details. 



School of Public Safety 
and Professional Studies 

The School of Public Safety and Professional 
Studies provides educational services for students 
who wish to major in degree programs specifically 
oriented toward career paths in aviation, occupa- 
tional safety and health, criminal justice, forensic 
science, fire science, arson investigation, fire protec- 
tion engineering, legal and paralegal studies and 
related programs. The school provides a broad pro- 
fessional education which often incorporates class- 
room learning with laboratory and field experience. 
The school attracts students of varied ages and levels 
of experience, from recent high school graduates to 
seasoned industry professionals. It also serves profes- 
sionals seeking programs designed to meet require- 
ments of national and/or regional accreditations and 
licensures. 

Graduate degree programs and certificates are avail- 
able in various disciplines through the Graduate 
School. 



UNH-Southeastern Connecticut 

UNH-Southeastern offers undergraduate pro- 
grams and certificates as well as graduate courses 
geared to the needs and interests of students in the 
New London area. Engineering, business, computer 
science and paralegal studies are available mostly on 
an evening basis to the general public as well as to 
employees of certain corporations. For further infor- 
mation, please contact UNH-Southeastern 
Connecticut, 469 Pequot Avenue, New London, CT 
06320 or phone (860) 701-5454, or 1-800-DIAL- 
UNH/ext. 7387. 



12 



Graduate School 

The Graduate School, founded in 1969, offers near- 
ly 30 master's programs and a variety of graduate certifi- 
cates. All academic programs are offered at the main 
campus in West Haven. Courses leading to the master's 
degree in business administration, education and other 
selected subjects are also offered at off-campus locations 
in New London, Newington, Stamford and Waterbury. 

Programs offered by the Graduate School are: 

Business Administration (M.B.A.) 

Business Administration/Industrial Engineering 

(dual degree) 
Business Administration/Public Administration 

(dual degree) 
Cellular and Molecular Biology 
Community Psychology 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 
Education 

Electrical Engineering 
Environmental Engineering 
Environmental Science 
Executive M.B.A. 

Executive Engineering Management 
Executive Tourism and Hospitality Management 
Fire Science 
Forensic Science 
Health Care Administration 
Human Nutrition 
Industrial Engineering 
Industrial Hygiene 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 
Labor Relations 

Management of Sports Industries 
Mechanical Engineering 
Occupational Safety and Health Management 
Operations Research 
PubHc Administration 

Graduate certificates are also offered through the 
Graduate School. 

The Graduate School operates on a trimester calen- 
dar, with terms beginning in September, January and 



April. Classes meet once each week during the regular 
trimesters. In addition, an abbreviated summer session 
is offered during July and August. Classes meet twice 
each week during this special summer session. 

To accommodate working professionals, most 
courses meet in the evenings, beginning at 5:30 or 6 
p.m. A few classes are scheduled earlier in the day or 
on weekends. Students may enroll either full- or part- 
time. 

Additional information regarding graduate programs 
may be obtained from the Graduate School Admissions 
Office, by e-mail from gradinfo@newhaven.edu, or by 
calling (203) 932-7133 or l-800-DL\L-UNH, ext. 
7133. 

Degrees Offered 
by the University 

The University of New Haven offers undergraduate 
programs leading to the bachelor of arts degree, the 
bachelor of science degree, and the associate in science 
degree. A number of undergraduate certificates are also 
available. 



Bachelor's Degrees 

The bachelor's degree programs at the University of 
New Haven generally require 120 or more credit hours 
of study and take a minimum of four years for full- 
time students. Part-time students take advantage of 
the fiill range of courses offered in the evening and 
complete their undergraduate degrees on a schedule 
that complements their careers. 



Associate's Degrees 

Associate degree programs are designed to encour- 
age students to begin their college education even 
though they do not yet want to commit themselves to 
a full, four-year course of study. A minimum of 60 
credit hours is required for the associate's degree, and 
the credits earned usually apply toward relevant bach- 
elor's degree programs. 



The University 1 3 



Certificates 

Students can take their first step toward an 
undergraduate degree by registering for one of the 
certificates offered by the university. 

Each certificate is carefully designed as a concen- 
trated introduction to a particular subject area and 
consists of courses totaling 15 or more credit hours. 

Later, students may choose to apply the credits 
they have earned toward a relevant undergraduate 
degree at the university. 

Please contact the director of part-time admis- 
sions or the appropriate academic department for 
further details. 



Graduate Degrees 

Through the UNH Graduate School, programs are 
offered leading to the master of arts degree, the master 
of science degree, the master of public administration, 
the master of business administration, the master of 
business administration (executive program) and a 
number of graduate certificate curricula. For more 
information, contact the Graduate School Admissions 
Office or consult the Graduate School catalog. 



University Policies 



Diversity Policy 

The University of New Haven is committed to 
achieving a diverse and pluralistic community which 
reflects the multi-racial and culturally diverse society 
in contemporary America. 

The Diversity Committee has been established to 
guide the university in implementing this diversity pol- 
icy. The university will work toward attracting and 
retaining a diverse faculty, staff and student body for 
the purpose of creating a pluralistic scholarly commu- 
nity. The committee will assist the administration in 
the development and implementation of programs and 
policies that support an enriched educational experi- 
ence for a diverse university community. 

The University of New Haven does not discrimi- 



nate in admissions, educational programs, or employ- 
ment against any individual on the basis of that indi- 
vidual's gender, race, color, religion, age, disability, sex- 
ual orientation, or national or ethnic origin. 

Notification of the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) 

The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to 
their education records, as follows: 

(1) The right to inspect and review the student's ed- 
ucation records within 45 days of the day the 
University receives a request for access. Students should 
submit to the registrar, dean, head of academic depart- 
ment or other appropriate official written requests that 
identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The universi- 
ty official will make arrangements for access and notify 
the student of the time and place where the records may 
be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the 
university official to whom the request was submitted, 
that official shall advise the student of the correct official 
to whom the request should be addressed. 

(2) The right to request the amendment of the stu- 
dent's education records that the student believes are 
inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the univer- 
sity to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or 
misleading. They should write the university official re- 
sponsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the 
record they want changed and specify why it is inaccu- 
rate or misleading. If the university decides not to 
amend the record as requested by the student, the uni- 
versity will notify the student of the decision and advise 
the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the 
request for amendment. Additional information regard- 
ing hearing procedures will be provided to the student 
when notified of the right to a hearing. 

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of per- 
sonally identifiable information contained in the 
student's education records, except to the extent 
that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. 

One exception which permits disclosure without 
consent is a disclosure to school officials with legiti- 
mate educational interests. A school official is a per- 
son employed by the university in an administrative, 
supervisory, academic or research, or support staff 



14 



position (including law enforcement unit personnel 
and health staff); a person or company with whom 
the university has contracted (such as an attorney, 
auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the 
Board of Governors; or a student serving on an offi- 
cial committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance 
committee, or assisting another school official in per- 
forming his or her tasks. A school official has a legit- 
imate educational interest if the official needs to re- 
view an education record in order to fulfill his or her 
professional responsibility. 

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. De- 
partment of Education concerning alleged failures by 
the University of New Haven to comply with the 
requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the 
office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy 
Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 
600 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 
20202-4605. 

The Student Right-to- Know and Campus 

Security Act 

In accordance with Connecticut's Public Act 90- 
259 concerning campus safety and the 1990 federal 
law, PLlOl-542: The Student Right-to-Know and 
Campus Security Act, all colleges and universities 
receiving state and federal financial assistance are 
required to maintain specific information related to 
campus crime statistics and security measures, annual- 
ly provide such information to all current students and 
employees, and make the data available to all prospec- 
tive students and their families and to prospective 
employees upon request. 

The university has worked hard to ensure that its 
students enjoy their years at UNH in a safe, secure 
environment. We are proud of our record in this 
regard. During 1998, the most recent calendar year for 
which statistics were available at this printing, rates of 
occurrence ranged from .0000 (in 7 of the reportable 
categories including homicide, rape, robbery and 
aggravated assault) to .0070 in larceny/theft, .0004 in 
burglary and .0007 in auto theft. 

At UNH, the required information is compiled by 
the University Police Department and is published 
annually. 



Drug-Free and Smoke-Free Environment 

In accordance with federal law concerning a drug- 
free campus environment, the relevant university poli- 
cy and regulations are provided to all current students 
and employees. The information is also available upon 
request. 

The No Smoking policy is in effect in any campus 
administrative, academic or recreational building. This 
restriction applies to all UNH offices, classrooms, hall- 
ways, stairwells, restrooms, dining facilities, confer- 
ence/meeting facilities, athletic facilities, and any other 
public spaces within these buildings. Smoking is con- 
fined to outdoor space, with ashtrays provided at 
entrances to each building. 

Smoking in the residence halls is restricted to rooms, 
suites and apartments which have been designated as 
allowing smoking as agreed upon by the roommates. 
Smoking is not allowed in lobbies, hallways, laundry 
rooms, meeting rooms, community rooms or any other 
public spaces within the residence halls. 



University Curricula 1 5 



UNIVERSITY CURRICULA 



University Core Curriculum 

The University of New Haven is a microcosm of 
American society: atomistic, necessarily specialized 
and unavoidably complex. Nevertheless, it is the belief 
of the university that all students matriculating for 
associate's or bachelor's degrees should develop a com- 
mon set of skills; furthermore, they should be exposed 
to a commonality of intellectual experiences which are 
the distinguishing traits of a university graduate. The 
purpose of the University Core Curriculum is to pre- 
pare all graduates for the changing, complex lives they 
will lead, to focus on the quality of their lives, and to 
enhance and expand the development of the wisdom 
by which they will frame their lives. 

The University Core Curriculum, in seeking to 
accomplish the above specific ends, is dynamic. The 
core offers students the broadest possible perspective 
in their disciplines. For that reason, the University 
Core Curriculum includes new interdisciplinary 
courses as well as existing disciplinary courses. The 
interrelationship of these courses enables students to 
develop skills and conceptual abilities: 

• Communication Skills 

• Clear Reasoning: 

Scientific methodology 

Quantitative skills 

Problem-solving and synthetic reasoning 

• Dimensions of Our World, including the 
following aspects: 

Social and cultural 
Natural and physical 
Technical 
Historical 
Ethical and moral 
Aesthetic 

• Courses will be chosen from the following categories: 

Laboratory science 
Social sciences 



History 

Literature or philosophy 

Art, music or theatre 

Bachelor's Degree 
Core Requirements 

The University Core Curriculum for bachelor's 
degree programs encompasses a minimum of 1 1 cours- 
es, totaling 34 credits. Individual schools or departments 
may require additional core curriculum courses for their 
students. Some of the objectives outlined above are 
incorporated into more than one of the following areas. 

Communication Skills 6 credits 

The intent of this area is to develop student skills in 
reading, writing and communicating in the English 
language. Two courses are required and should be 
taken in the freshman year: 

E 105 Composition (or E 106 for 
international students) 

E 1 10 Composition and Literature (or E 111 
for international students) 

If a student places out of E 105, then CO 100 
Human Communication or a technical writing course 
(E 220 or E 225) must be taken. 

Clear Reasoning 9 credits 

Quantitative Skills (3 credits) 

All students must be able to think abstractly, to 
solve problems and to possess a basic ability to do 
numerical computations and elementary algebra. 

Choose from the following: 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra, or 
M 1 27 Finite Mathematics, or 

demonstration of an equivalent level of skill Students 
may satisfy this requirement by satisfactory perform- 
ance on a placement test administered by the 
Mathematics Department. 



16 



Computers (3 credits minimum) 

Students should be able to use a computer to meet 
their needs. They should be able to operate the 
machinery, bring a program into execution, and use 
that program to accomplish some useful end. 
Students may select one of the following options: 

Option A — one course: 

CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

Option B — one of the following two-course sequences: 

I 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I 
CS 111 Introduction to C Programming II 
(for non-CS majors) 

II 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I 
CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

III 

ES 108 Engineering Workshop 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I 

Option C — one of the following three-course 
sequences: 

I 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 
M 228 Elementary Statistics 
SO 350 Social Survey Research 

II 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

P 301 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 

P 305 Experimental Methods in Psychology 

III 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

P 301 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 

SO 350 Social Survey Research 

Scientific Methodology (3 credits) 

Scientific methodology is often taken to represent 
the best example of clear reasoning and is one of the 
basic methods through which we gain knowledge of 
the universe. Understanding the methods of science 
improves the student's ability to reason clearly. In 
special cases this requirement can be fulfilled by a 



research course that familiarizes the student with the 
theory, methods and culture of science. A request for 
such substitution must be made to the Core 
Curriculum Committee. The substitution will be 
approved if the request is accompanied by a 
proposal for a research project, and if the proposal 
requires the student to provide a survey of the liter- 
ature and to discuss methodology, causal relation- 
ships observed, and the results and significance 
of the research. 

Students select one of the following: 

ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 

HS 108 History of Science 

HU300 The Nature of Science 

PL 240 Philosophy of Science and Technology 

Dimensions of Our World .... 19 credits 

Laboratory Science 

Students should understand the methodology of at 
least one basic science. One laboratory course satisfies 
the requirement: 

BI 121 



BI 122 

BI 253 

BI 254 

CH 103 & 104 

CH 105 

CH 115 & 117 

CH 116& 118 

EN 101 & 102 

PH 100 
PH 103 
PH 104 
PH 150 



General and Human Biology 

with Laboratory I 

General and Human Biology 

with Laboratory II 

Biology for Science Majors 

with Laboratory I 

Biology for Science Majors 

with Laboratory II 

Introduction to General 

Chemistry with Laboratory 

Introduction to General and 

Organic Chemistry with Laboratory 

General Chemistry I 

with Laboratory 

General Chemistry II 

with Laboratory 

Introduction to Environmental 

Science with Laboratory 

Introductory Physics with Laboratory 
General Physics I with Laboratory 
General Physics II with Laboratory 

Mechanics, Heat and Waves 

with Laboratory 



University Curricula 17 



Social Sciences 

Some breadth of understanding of our society is to 
be acquired by taking a basic course in each of two 
different social science departments. The following 
are acceptable choices: 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

EC 134 Principles of Economics II 

P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

PS 101 Introduction to Politics 

PS 121 American Government and Politics 

PS 241 International Relations 

PS 281-285 Comparative Political Systems 

SO 113 Sociology 

SO 1 14 Contemporary Social Problems 

SO 221 Cultural Anthropology 

SO 390 Sociology of Organizations 

History 

Western civilizations are studied as a basis for under- 
standing our own society: 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

Literature or Philosophy 

Students should acquire some depth of understand- 
ing of the human condition and of human endeavor. 
One sophomore-level course in literature or philosophy 
is to be selected from the following courses: 

Any literature course at the 200 level or higher, or 

PL 201 Philosophical Methods 

PL 205 Classical Philosophy 

PL 206 Modern Philosophy 

PL 215 Nature of the Self 

PL 222 Ethics 

Art, Music or Theatre 

Students should study the methodology, history, 
practice and content of one of the arts. Students must 
choose one of the following courses: 

AT 101 Introduction to Studio Art I 

AT 231 History of Art I 

AT 232 History of Art II 

AT 331 Contemporary Art 

MU 1 1 1 Introduction to Music 

MU 1 12 Introduction to World Music 

MU 125-126 Elementary Music Theory 



MU 211 History of Rock 

T 131 Introduction to the Theatre 

T 132 Theatrical Style 

T 241 Early World Drama and Theatre 

T 242 Modern World Drama and Theatre 

Associate's Degree Core Requirements 

Students pursuing an associate's degree must satisfy 
the following core curriculum requirements: 

Communication Skills 6 credits 

Quantitative Skills 3 credits 

Computers 3 credits 

Social Sciences (one course) 3 credits 

History 3 credits 

Art, Music or Theatre 3 credits 

These specific requirements are explained in detail 
above. All core requirements satisfied by the student for 
the associate's degree will be applied toward the larger 
bachelor's degree core if the student continues study. 

Academic Advising 

To assist students in their academic development, 
the university assigns an academic adviser from the 
department of each student's chosen field of study. As 
soon and as often as possible, wise students seek the 
advice of their academic advisers regarding major 
requirements, career opportunities, choice of a minor 
and progress in their major, as well as other areas of 
personal interest. At the time of registration, the aca- 
demic advisers assist in and approve course selection. 
Students also confer with their advisers when adding 
or dropping courses, and advisers often make referrals 
to other qualified personnel on campus. The academ- 
ic adviser is, therefore, the link between the student 
and the academic regulations of the university. 

The Honors Program 

The UNH Honors Program is designed for highly 
motivated students who have shown high levels of 
academic achievement. In order to enter the program, a 
student must have completed at least 24 credit hours 
with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.3 at 
the time the first honors course is undertaken. 

Applicants for the program are evaluated on the 



18 



basis of high school performance, college performance, 
standardized test (SAT, ACT) scores and recommen- 
dations of college teachers. 

The Honors Program 

The university requires every student, regardless of 
major, to take a number of core courses in nine gener- 
al areas. The Honors Program offers students an intel- 
lectually exciting and challenging way to satisfy some 
of these core requirements. 

Students in the program take one honors seminar 
each semester for four semesters. Each seminar 
actively involves students in problem solving and in 
inquiry. Topics in the seminars draw from several dis- 
ciplines and study linkages between disciplines. Each 
course satisfies one of the university core curriculum 
requirements. 

Some of the Honors Seminars offered recently have 
included the following: 

"Physics and Music: The Persistence of Symmetry." 
The parallel views of the physicist and the musician 
were explored to see how these views developed side- 
by-side and where they diverged. 

"Cultural Entrepreneuralism." The cultural impor- 
tance of Connecticut artifacts were integrated with 
their potential as sites for tourism and economic devel- 
opment. Historical, cultural, literary and economic 
impacts were assessed in relation to geography, popu- 
lation, education and cultural expectations. 

"Engineering and Society. " Relationships between 
engineering and society were investigated by focusing 
on environmental concerns. 

"Politics and American Art." This course focused 
on the major styles and motifs in American art and 
architecture and their relationship to American politi- 
cal history, attitudes and concepts from Colonial times 
through the 20th century. 

"Contexts and Images: African-Americans in 
Literature and Film." This course provided an oppor- 
tunity to examine literature and film as integral ele- 
ments of African-American experience, heritage and 
culture from the Civil War to the present. 

After completing the four honors seminars, stu- 
dents write an honors thesis in their major discipline 



under the guidance of a professor in the major depart- 
ment. Up to six credits may be awarded for this thesis. 
The results of the research are to be presented orally to 
members of the students major department and to 
members of the Honors Committee. 

In order to remain in the program, students must 
maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 
3.3 throughout their studies at UNH. 

Advantages of the Honors Program 

In addition to a challenging and exciting curricu- 
lum, the Honors Program offers: 

Financial Aid: A student who has successfully com- 
pleted the four seminar courses described above and 
one additional semester of work on an honors thesis, 
all with a cumulative grade point average of 3.3, will 
be granted a 50% tuition reduction by UNH for the 
final semester in residence at UNH. 

Small Classes: Honors program classes provide an 
opportunity for participation and discussion in a set- 
ting where students know their instructors and their 
fellow students. 

Recognition: A student who successfully completes 
the honors program, including the honors thesis, 
will be designated as an Honors Scholar on the tran- 
script and on the diploma awarded at graduation. 
Thus, prospective employers, graduate schools and 
other institutions will be aware of this extra accom- 
plishment in the student's pursuit of the undergrad- 
uate degree. 

Developmental Studies Program 

The developmental studies program is designed to 
strengthen the basic skills of entering students. 
Courses within the program are taught by members of 
the faculty of the mathematics department and the 
English department. 

The English department offers three developmental 
courses: E 101 Academic Reading; E 103 English 
Fundamentals; and E 114 Oral Exposition. The three 
courses offer students a comprehensive study of the 
basic reading, writing and speaking skills necessary in 



University Curricula 19 



using the English language effectively. M 103 
Fundamental Mathematics is taught by the mathe- 
matics department. 

Placement in these courses is determined by exam- 
inations given by the respective departments. Such 
placement becomes a first priority for affected students 
because the university believes such students can 
become successful college students only upon correc- 
tion of skill deficiencies. 

Please note E 101, E 103 and M 103 each carry 
three college credits but cannot be applied toward stu- 
dents' degree programs. E 103 and M 103 usually 
meet for up to six hours per week to provide intensive 
help. 

Complete descriptions of the developmental cours- 
es appear in this catalog as part of the course offerings 
of the mathematics department and the English 
department. 

Freshman Year Program 

In their first year, college students face a number of 
new challenges that they never had to cope with dur- 
ing their high school years. The Freshman Year 
Program at UNH is designed to help students make 



the transition into this environment. 

This program incorporates the talents of more than 
40 university personnel, both faculty and staff, and 
reflects the University of New Haven's commitment to 
high quality student advising. 

During their first semester, all new freshmen are 
required to take the 10-week team-taught "FE 001 
Freshman Experience Seminar, " which addresses such 
topics as the mission of UNH, academic standards, 
diversity, time and stress management, college life vs. 
high school life, university relationships, responsible 
human sexuality, exploration of self, alcohol and sub- 
stance abuse, and career planning and development. 
The goal of this seminar is to give students the tools to 
help them understand and succeed in what can be, and 
increasingly is becoming, a very competitive environ- 
ment. FE 001 is mandatory for all incoming first-time 
freshmen with no previous college experience. 

A second key component of the Freshman Year 
Program involves matching the freshman class with a 
team of faculty advisers in order to ensure a low stu- 
dent-faculty ratio. Students will find their faculty 
advisers readily available for counsel both in their 
freshman year and beyond. 



20 



THE UNIVERSITY 
COMMUNITY 



The University of New Haven encompasses an envi- 
ronment designed to foster the personal growth of its 
students. Through its programs, services and faciHties, it 
provides the opportunity for students to become 
involved in meaningful activities which can develop 
into life-long interests. These activities include recre- 
ational, social, community out-reach, professional and, 
of course, academic pursuits. In addition, the campus 
provides most of the services needed to assure the com- 
fort and well-being of its students. 

Academic Support Services 

Academic services are provided to facilitate and 
enhance students' academic progress through the uni- 
versity by furnishing guided access to advisory sources 
and ancillaty support systems. Many of the available 
services are described below. 

Office of Academic Services 

The Office of Academic Services, located in Maxcy 
Hall, provides a wide range of academic support to day 
and evening undergraduate students. 

Academic Skills Counselors work with students 
individually or in small groups to strengthen abilities 
or make referrals to other qualified personnel on cam- 
pus. They help students develop an individualized 
study strategy that focuses on textbook reading, lecture 
note-taking, time management, learning and memory 
strategies and test-taking skills. 

The office provides monitoring services to enable 
counselors, mentors and coaches to assess students' 
progress in their courses. The office also coordinates 
the efforts of the mentors responsible for working with 
students who are enrolled in the developmental math 
and English courses. The office also provides advisers 
for the activities of both the day and evening Honor 
Societies and the Evening Student Council. 



Center for Learning Resources 

The Center for Learning Resources (CLR) offers 
free tutoring to students seeking extra help with their 
studies. The tutoring staff, over 25 instructors in all, is 
comprised largely of professionals who hold advanced 
degrees in their fields and who are committed to aid- 
ing the learning process. Tutoring is available six days 
a week throughout each semester. 

The CLR includes four labs: The Math Lab offers 
help with mathematics, science, and business courses; 
the Writing Lab offers help with all writing assign- 
ments. Both labs operate primarily on a drop-in basis, 
but the Writing Lab also offers appointments. The 
two computer labs have the latest Microsoft software, 
math tutorials, and Internet access. The larger of these 
labs is available for classroom teaching. 

Developmental Studies Program 

The developmental studies program is designed to 
strengthen the basic skills of entering students. Cours- 
es within the program are taught by members of the 
faculty of the Mathematics department and the En- 
glish department. (See the University Curricula sec- 
tion of this catalog for additional information.) 

Freshman Year Advising Program 

The Freshman Year Program at UNH is designed to 
smooth the transition full-time students make as they 
pass from high school into the substantially different 
environment of a university. (See the University Curric- 
ula section of this catalog for additional information.) 

Student Services 

The University of New Haven cares deeply about 
the well-being of its students. A variety of services are 
available on campus to meet needs ranging from career 



The University Community 21 



advising to health care. Every effort is made to accom- the university community. Among these are career 

modate special student needs, such as helping interna- counseling, advising, on-campus employment inter- 

tional students to adjust to a new culture or ensuring viewing, career fairs, and extensive information about 

that classes and facilities are readily accessible to stu- job opportunities. 

dents with disabilities. Many of the available services Administrative and recruiting offices are located on 

are described in the following section. ^h^ j^^in floor of Kaplan Hall. 



Campus Card Office/Parking Permits 

The UNH Campus Card offers many services and 
advantages for all members of the UNH campus com- 
munity. The Campus Card is a credit-card sized, color 
photo identification card. It is to be used as the official 
UNH library card, residential meal plan card, for secu- 
rity access identification and for a number of other 
services. 

All new students are required to obtain a Campus 
Card in order to register for a parking permit. The 
Campus Card must be renewed at the beginning of the 
Fall term every year by all returning students. Campus 
Card photos are taken at Echlin Hall on the main 
campus. Campus Card Office hours are posted at the 
beginning of each term. 

New students may obtain a main campus parking 
sticker for their cars or motorcycles at the Campus 
Card Office or at the Campus Police Office located in 
the lower level of the Campus Bookstore. All cars must 
display a UNH parking sticker; vehicles parked in vio- 
lation may be ticketed or towed. Detailed information 
on parking regulations, violations and reporting of 
accidents is contained in the Student Handbook. 

University Police Office 

The staff of the University Police Office are certi- 
fied police officers who undergo continuous training 
and who have been trained in emergency medical pro- 
cedures, first aid and CPR. They conduct regularly 
scheduled campus patrols and work closely with local, 
state and federal agencies to enforce the laws of the 
State of Connecticut, especially those most pertinent 
to campus safety and security. The University Police 
Office is fully staffed 24 hours/day. 

Career Development Office 

This office offers employment-related services to 



Career Development 

To assist students in making appropriate career 
choices, individual/group counseling is available and is 
supplemented by several office resources. Special 
workshops on resume preparation, interviewing skills 
and job research techniques are scheduled in both the 
fall and spring semesters. 

In addition, the office maintains an extensive library 
of career information, vocational resources, brochures, 
and selected periodicals. 

Student Employment 

During each academic year, employer representa- 
tives visit the campus to interview graduating 
University of New Haven students. While the Career 
Development Office is not an employment service and 
does not guarantee jobs, extensive listings of both fiill- 
and part-time positions are also maintained to provide 
a common meeting ground for employers and 
prospective employees. Students will find this useful, 
both in locating part-time and full-time jobs while in 
school, as well as employment following graduation. 
Alumni seeking positions are encouraged to use the 
services of the office. 

Employers wishing to list positions need only call 
or write, giving a description of the position available 
and other pertinent details. There is no placement fee 
charged for these services. 

Information 

The CDO publishes updates of recruiter visits in 
The Charger Bulletin as well as information regarding 
Career Development events, the employment outlook 
for graduates and job search hints. Career Develop- 
ment information is also provided to hisight, the 
UNH alumni publication. 



22 



Cooperative Education 

Cooperative Education (Co-op) is an academic 
support program that enables students to combine 
career-oriented, paid, full-time or part-time work 
experience with their college education. Co-op stu- 
dents benefit by being able to explore career interests 
firsthand, by gaining valuable work experience related 
to their majors, and by earning money to assist with 
their college expenses. 

How Co-op Works 

Students should inquire about Co-op when they 
begin their degree programs. Work assignments start 
later, usually at the end of the sophomore year. The 
keys to a successful Co-op experience are flexibility 
and preparation. Co-op coordinators advise and coun- 
sel students in each academic area, helping students to 
prepare resumes and develop interview skills. 

The flexibility of the UNH Co-op program gives 
students a chance to schedule plans of study and work 
which fit their needs. Undergraduate students attend 
classes for the first two years of college, and they pre- 
pare for work assignments which start at the end of the 
sophomore year. Juniors and seniors alternate classes 
with co-op work which may last four or six months. 
Transfer students typically complete one semester on 
campus and may then enter the co-op cycle, provided 
they have completed their sophomore year. Individual 
cases vary and students should review their needs with 
Co-op coordinators. 

The variety and number of co-op employers 
attest to their recognition that cooperative education 
is an effective way to identify and train future 
employees. Active co-op employers include: 
American Cyanamid, Black & Decker, Corometrics, 
Dow UT, Dictaphone, Pitney Bowes, Pratt & 
Whitney, Sikorsky and Remington Products as well 
as state and federal agencies. Student assignments 
include computer programming, accounting, coun- 
seling, criminal investigation and engineering. Stu- 
dents may live in university housing while doing 
work assignments in the greater New Haven area, or 
they may work with their Co-op coordinators to 
develop jobs closer to home. 



Students interested in Co-op will meet with a Co-op 
coordinator to review eligibility requirements and the 
plan of study for their degree program. Co-op plans vary, 
which makes it important for students in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and in the Schools of Business, 
Engineering and Applied Science, Public Safety and Pro- 
fessional Studies, and Hospitality and Tourism to take 
advantage of the individual attention their Co-op coor- 
dinators will provide. With this support. Co-op students 
can combine classroom theory and work experience to 
make the most of their college careers. 



Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center offers services designed 
to help students with problems that may interfere 
with their academic, social or personal activities. 
The services provided include confidential personal 
counseling, academic counseling, vocational coun- 
seling and testing, personality assessment and educa- 
tional assessment. 

Office of University Advancement 

The Office of University Advancement works 
with the university community to develop philan- 
thropic support for enhancement of the university's 
programs, facilities and endowment. Gifts to the uni- 
versity enhance student financial aid, faculty devel- 
opment, equipment, library resources and other 
institutional opportunities for growth. 

The generosity of corporations, foundations, par- 
ents, students, alumni and friends all contribute to the 
excellence of the University of New Haven. 

Disability Services and Resources 

The Disability Services and Resources Office is 
responsible for and committed to providing services 
and support that promote educational equity for stu- 
dents with disabilities, either temporary or permanent. 
The office provides assistance and information on 
issues of access and full participation for students with 
disabilities. Any UNH student with a disabling condi- 
tion can benefit from these services. Referrals and 
inquiries concerning matters relating to students with 



The University Community 23 



disabilities and/or reasonable accommodations should 
be directed to this office. 

The staff works with those who self-identify as a 
student with a disability in the following categories: 



mobility/orthopedic disabilities 
specific learning disabilities 
attention deficit disorders 
vision and hearing impairments 
head injuries 

psychological/emotional disorders 
chronic health-related disabilities 
speech impairments 



Staff members serve as advocates, liaisons, and 
planners for ensuring access to academic, cultural and 
recreational offerings of the campus and are available 
to students whenever questions or problems arise. The 
director assists the university's 504/ADA Compliance 
Officer with oversight of the university's compliance 
with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 
the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and other 
government regulations. The director also handles stu- 
dent grievances, whether informal or formal, regarding 
allegations of discrimination based on disability. 

In order to receive accommodations and/or services 
students are responsible to self-identify as a student with 
a disability, submitting appropriate documentation, 
making a specific request for reasonable accommoda- 
tions, and following established policies and procedures 
for arranging accommodations each semester/trimester. 

The Disability Services & Resources Office is locat- 
ed on the ground level in the rear of Sheffield Hall. 
The director can be reached by voice/TDD at (203) 
932-7331. The university's 504/ADA Compliance 
Officer can be reached at (203) 932-7199. 

Health Services Center 

The University Health Services Center is open to 
all university students without charge. Located on the 
ground level in the rear of the Sheffield Residence 
Hall, the center is staffed with two registered nurses 
and part-time physicians. The Health Services Center 



provides initial care for minor illnesses and injuries, as 
well as diagnosis, referral and follow-up care for more 
serious conditions. Also provided is care and counsel- 
ing in health-related issues. The Health Services 
Center coordinates the health insurance program that 
is sponsored by the university. 

A part of the health program is a weekly women's 
clinic which takes place at the health center and covers 
gynecological problems, birth control and sex-related 
issues. 

One requirement of the health center is that all stu- 
dents entering the Full-Time Division provide docu- 
mentation of their medical and immunization history 
by completing the health form provided by the 
Undergraduate Admissions Ofi"ice and returning it to 
the Health Services Center. All students who plan to 
live in Residential Housing must provide proof of hav- 
ing received a meningitis vaccine. These requirements 
are in compliance with the State of Connecticut 
Health Department's guidelines for immunization and 
disease control. 

International Services 

The university has a large and active international 
student program with more than 600 students from 
more than 50 countries. In addition to assisting stu- 
dents with immigration and adjustment matters. 
International Services works with the International 
Student Association to coordinate and plan cultural, 
educational and social programs. 



To All Students (Full-time undergraduate, part- 
time undergraduate day and evening, full- and part- 
time graduate students): Students must provide doc- 
umentation of two valid measles vaccines. The first 
must be given after 1/1/69 and that date must be 
after your first birthday. The second dose must be 
given after 1/1/80. Also, a rubella vaccine must be 
given after your first birthday. Blood tests from a 
laboratory will also be accepted (showing immuni- 
ty). It is the policy of the university to withhold reg- 
istration each semester for non-compliance. Proper 
immunization information must be on file in the 
Health Services Office. 



24 



Multicultural Affairs & Services 

The director of Multicultural Affairs and Services 
works closely with students, faculty and administrators 
in developing and implementing educational pro- 
grams for minority students. The office also provides 
academic and personal advising for students to assist 
them in their growth and transition into the various 
facets of the university's environment. 

The Office for Multicultural Affairs provides the 
catalyst for building a support network between the 
community at large and UNH. Even though the 
major focus is on issues of Black, Hispanic, Asian 
and American Indian students, all students are 
encouraged to take advantage of the financial, aca- 
demic and personal advising and are invited to par- 
ticipate in the various educational, social and cultur- 
al programs. 

A minor in Black Studies is offered by the College 
of Arts and Sciences and housed in the English 
Department. For information contact the chair of the 
English Department, Dr. Donald M. Smith. 

Residential Life 

The character of residential living is often a good 
indication of the spirit and life on campus. The goal 
of the University's residential life program is to pro- 
vide a living/learning environment which promotes 
academic and personal growth and a sense of com- 
munity among students. A student's on-campus liv- 
ing experience is considered an integral part of the 
educational process. 

Students live in five residence halls — one fresh- 
man hall, and four halls for upperclassmen which are 
supervised by Resident Directors responsible for the 
administration of the residence hall. Resident 
Assistants (RAs) live on each floor and serve as peer 
advisers, role models, and initiators of activities and 
programs. 

University housing is occupied on an academic year 
basis, and all freshmen and sophomores are required to 
live on campus unless they live with a parent or an 
extended family member. All resident students are 
required to purchase a university meal plan. 

The Office of Residential Life maintains a limit- 



ed listing of available off-campus housing. Students 
are responsible for any contract undertaken for 
housing and should consider carefully the nature of 
that contract and the responsibilities incurred. 

University Dining Services 

University Dining Services are the Marketplace 
Food Court and the Jazzman's Cafe, which are located 
in the Campus Center, and the Quad C-Store located 
in Botwinick Hall. 

Students may select from meal plans which include 
declining balance and board options. Purchasing a 
meal plan, which is highly recommended for all stu- 
dents, is required for all resident students. Detailed 
information on meal plans is available at the Dining 
Services Office. 

Student Activities 

Being a student at the University of New Haven 
means having the best of both worlds-an active on- 
campus community and the city of New Haven. 
Whether students are interested in cultural, intellectu- 
al or social pursuits, they have a wealth of opportuni- 
ties from which to choose. 

The Student Committee on Programs and Events 
(SCOPE) works cooperatively with the Office of 
Student Activities to provide a wide variety of events 
throughout each week. With an increase in the quanti- 
ty and quality of activities over past years, theme week- 
ends such as Spring Weekend, Family Weekend and 
Homecoming Weekend have been supplemented by an 
ongoing activities calendar of weekly events. There are 
plenty of opportunities to socialize and interact with fel- 
low students, faculty and staff — ^whether it be enjoying 
a band, lecture, comedian or magician; participating in 
a volunteer opportunity; or taking a bus trip to a region- 
al theater or recreation center. 

Students are also encouraged to develop their cultur- 
al and intellectual interests by participating in literary, 
artistic and dramatic events. Visiting artists, play and 
concert productions, invited lecturers, forums and panel 
discussions are among the variety of programs that are 
available to students. Two cultural groups. Orchestra 



The University Community 25 



New England and the AlUance Theatre are also in resi- 
dence on our campus. 

Alumni Relations 

The Alumni Relations staff welcomes all alumni to 
become involved in the many activities and benefits 
associated with the University of New Haven. Being a 
member of the UNH Alumni Association provides 
continuing friendships, professional networking 
opportunities, educational happenings, and exciting 
athletic and social events. 

Some of the benefits members of the Alumni 
Association receive include use of the university's 
library, career development services, low-interest cred- 
it card privileges, the opportunity to audit courses at a 
minimum fee and more! Information about current 
activities at UNH and alumni news are available on 
the university's website and also via Insight Magazine, 
Insight Outlook and special newsletters. Active local 
alumni clubs encourage participation in a variety of 
activities, especially social events and professional net- 
working. Alumni are invited back to campus each year 
for Homecoming festivities, golf tournaments and the 
Scholarship Ball, which raises significant funds for stu- 
dent scholarships. 

The Alumni Board of Directors is a valued adviso- 
ry group for the university, working to strengthen 
bonds by promoting communication with alumni and 
the UNH community. 

Athletics/Intramurals/Recreation 

Recognizing the importance of a broad range of 
physical and emotional outlets to a well-balanced col- 
lege experience, the University of New Haven seeks to 
involve the student on various levels of active partici- 
pation in games and sports, as well as to provide an 
opportunity for community and student support for 
its varsity intercollegiate program. 

Varsity Sports 

The University of New Haven athletics teams make up 
one of the most respected and successful NCAA 
Division II programs in the country. 

The university offers 20 varsity sports which 



include baseball, men's and women's basketball, men's 
and women's cross country as well as indoor and out- 
door track, football, men's and women's golf, men's 
and women's lacrosse, men's and women's soccer, soft- 
ball, women's tennis, and men's and women's volley- 
ball. Students can also participate in cheerleading and 
the dance team throughout the school year. The 
Athletics Department coaching staff welcome all inter- 
ested candidates and invite active involvement in and 
support of its athletics programs. 

The University of New Haven is a member of the 
National College Athletic Association, the Eastern 
College Athletic Conference and the New York 
Collegiate Athletic Conference. Our athletics teams have 
enjoyed national recognition over the years. The 
women's volleyball program has participated in 14 con- 
secutive NCAA Regional tournaments. Our baseball 
program has advanced to the NCAA Division II College 
World Series 15 times in 39 seasons. The nationally 
ranked football program has not had a losing season 
since 1991 and has qualified for the playoffs four times, 
including a berth in the 1997 National Championship 
game. The women's basketball team captured the 1 986- 
1987 NCAA Division II National Championship. 

Intramural Programs 

Intramurals are an important part of the UNH athlet- 
ics program. The school's intramural director sched- 
ules league and individual play year-round. Sports 
offered include 3-on-3 basketball, street hockey, 5- 
on-5 touch football, co-rec volleyball, monopoly 
marathon, turkey trot road race, table tennis, 8-ball 
billiards, racquetball tournaments, Latin dance 
instruction, karate, and beginners' weightlifting/con- 
ditioning. For more information on intra- 
mural programs, click on the UNH website 
www. newhaven. edu/campuslife. 

Athletic Facilities 

The North Campus Athletic Complex consists of 
Robert B. Dodds Stadium (with a multi-purpose, nat- 
ural surface field designed for football, soccer and 
lacrosse), Frank Vieira Baseball Field, six tennis courts, 
a Softball field, two outdoor basketball hoops and a 
1,500 seat gymnasium. 



26 



The Charger Gymnasium houses two full-size bas- 
ketball courts, a fitness center, a racquetball court and 
locker/shower areas for students and faculty. 

A valid university ID card is required for admittance 
to the Charger Gymnasium. The gymnasium will open 
for recreation at times when regularly scheduled games 
and varsity team practices are not in progress. 

Clubs and Organizations 

More than 40 university student clubs and societies 
exist for interested students. Included are student chap- 
ters of professional societies, community service organi- 
zations, social groups and special interest clubs such as 
the International Student Association, the Black Student 
Union and the Latin American Student Association. 

Fraternities and Sororities 

National and local service, social and honorary fra- 
ternities and sororities are active on campus. They 
sponsor programs such as banquets, game shows, the 
semi-annual Bloodmobile, AIDS Awareness Week, 
and fiind-raisers to benefit charities. 

Off-Campus Activities 

For those who want a change of pace from the col- 
lege scene, the university's close proximity to the city 
of New Haven offers students many cultural opportu- 
nities. Musical entertainment ranges from year-round 
performances of the New Haven Symphony to rock 
concerts at the New Haven Coliseum to local bands at 
many downtown clubs. Professional theatre thrives in 
New Haven at Long Wharf Theater, the Yale 
Repertory Company and the Shubert. Some of the 
region's outstanding art collections can be seen on the 
Yale University campus. 

On weekends the Connecticut shore, Cape Cod, 
the ski slopes of Vermont and New Hampshire, and 
New York City are just a car or train ride away. 

Publications 

Student publications include 77?^ Charger Bulletin, 
the student newspaper, and The Chariot, the annual 
yearbook. Students may volunteer their services to 



these student publications by contacting the USGA 
Office (see below). 

Student Government 

Separate undergraduate hill-, part-time and graduate 
student councils have the responsibility for initiating, 
organizing and presenting extracurricular activities and 
acting as a liaison between students and university staff. 

The Undergraduate Student Government 
Association (USGA) is a forum where undergraduate 
full-time students provide input to the administra- 
tion to improve all aspects of the undergraduate edu- 
cation at the university. Student-elected senators rep- 
resent the voice of their constituencies at weekly 
USGA meetings. 

Students are strongly encouraged to get involved 
with leadership positions within the student govern- 
ment and other clubs and organizations. The universi- 
ty believes that leadership development is an integral 
part of all students' education. 

The Evening Student Council is a board composed 
of students attending UNH evening classes. It has 
three primary objectives: (1) to promote the welfare of 
the evening student body, (2) to give counsel and 
encouragement to all evening students as well as to 
develop and encourage school spirit, and (3) to convey 
evening students' opinions to the administration and 
work with the administration in accomplishing stu- 
dent objectives. 

Membership in the Evening Student Council is 
open to all undergraduate evening students enrolled in 
courses for credit. The council meets regularly and all 
evening students are invited to participate. In addition 
to the standard elected officers, student relations and 
public relations chairs assist the social committee in 
planning a variety of special events each year. 

WNHU Radio 

WTSIHU, the university's student-operated FM 
stereo broadcast facility, is operated by the communi- 
cation department of the School of Business. WT^HU 
broadcasts throughout the year on a frequency of 88.7 
MHz at a power of 1,700 watts. This extracurricular 



The University Community 27 



activity, open to all undergraduate or graduate stu- 
dents, serves southern Connecticut and eastern Long 
Island with the best in music, news and community 
affairs programming. The WNHU broadcast day con- 
sists of locally produced shows as well as various pro- 
grams provided by several public networks. 

Most WNHU activities in programming, business 
and engineering operations are performed by stu- 
dents in the university's full-time and part-time 
undergraduate and graduate divisions. The station 
will train all qualified students in their respective 
areas of interest. 

Campus Facilities 

The university's 78-acre campus contains 25 build- 
ings that offer students modern laboratory and library 
facilities, the latest in computer technology and equip- 
ment, an athletic complex and residential facilities. 

Located in West Haven, about 10 minutes from 
downtown New Haven, the main campus includes 
administration, library, laboratory, computer and class- 
room facilities as well as the admissions and financial aid 
building, bookstore, student center and residence halls. 
A recent addition to the main campus are two new resi- 
dence halls, creating a residential quad area. 

The South Campus includes Harugari Hall and 
South Campus Hall, the student records building. The 
North Campus is the site of the university's athletic 
fields and gymnasium. 

Some of these facilities are described in subsequent 
sections of the catalog. 

Computer Facilities 

The University of New Haven maintains many 
computer laboratories and teaching classrooms at var- 
ious locations around the campus. The general access 
computer lab and general access Internet lab, open to 
all students at the University, are located on the first 
floor of Echlin Hall. During the undergraduate semes- 
ters, these labs are open: 

Mondays - Fridays 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

Saturdays 1 1:00 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

Sundays 1 1:00 a.m. to 10 p.m. 



The labs are open on an abbreviated schedule at 
other times during the year. The university also main- 
tains a computer teaching classroom in Maxcy Hall, 
Room 129, that is open for general student use on a 
varying schedule throughout the undergraduate semes- 
ters. Hours for this lab are posted in both the general 
access labs and outside of Room 129 in Maxcy Hall. 

The general access lab provides students with word 
processing software, spreadsheet and database manage- 
ment software, SPSS statistical software, Pascal, C, 
C++ and other programming language compilers and 
Internet connectivity. Laser printers are available for 
student use. The general access Internet lab is dedicat- 
ed to providing students with access to e-mail. World 
Wide Web and other Internet protocols. The general 
access labs are staffed by one full-time Information 
Services Department staff member and several trained 
student assistants who are available to help anyone 
who has questions. The hardware and software avail- 
able in the labs are continuously upgraded as comput- 
er technology changes. 

Several schools and departments at the university 
maintain their own computer labs and teaching class- 
rooms. The hours that these labs are open and the 
resources available are at the discretion of the individ- 
ual school or department. 

Computer facilities provided by UNH as of the 
Spring of 2002 are as follows: 

School of Engineering and Applied Science, 
Buckman Hall 225 and 225a 

School of Engineering and Applied Science Multi- 
Media Teaching Classroom, Buckman Hall 227 

Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism, 
Harugari Hall 114 

School of Business Lab and Teaching Classroom, 
DoddsHall 103 

Department of Biology and Environmental Science, 
Dodds Hall 305 

Department of Visual & Performing Arts/Philosophy, 
Dodds Hall 413 

Department of Computer Science, Echlin Hall 208 

Center for Learning Resources Tutorial Lab, 
Maxcy Hall 106 



28 



Center for Learning Resources Teaching Classroom, 
MaxcyHail 127 

General Access Computer Lab, Echlin Hall 113 

General Access Internet Lab, Echlin Hall 1 1 5 

General Purpose Teaching Classroom, 

MaxcyHail 129 

UNH Southeastern at New London, CT 

Marvin K. Peterson Library 

The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named in honor of 
a former university president, w^as dedicated in 1974. It 
includes three floors of reading space, stacks and refer- 
ence areas. Information is made accessible through 
manual as well as electronic retrieval methods. 
Computers with internet access are available for research 
purposes. Students and faculty can plug-in their laptop 
computers to connect to the campus network at 165 
ports available throughout the library's three floors. 

The library's online catalog is available via the web at 
http://library.newhaven.edu. Materials are stored in a 
variety of formats including online, print, audio, video, 
microform and CD-ROM disks. Faculty and students in 
their offices, residence halls, or at home have access to 
electronic resources through the "PROXY Connection" 
available on the library's homepage. UNH subscribes to 
many online electronic databases in all subjects. 
Additional resources, including many fiill-text sources, 
are accessed in online data-bases such as DIALOG, 
LEKIS/NEXIS, OCLC, ProQuest Direct, Expanded 
Academic Index ASAP, Engineering Village and 
Compendex Web, FirstSearch, CCH Online, GPO 
Access, WestLaw, Hoover's, Science Direct, Reference 
USA, Country Watch, GPO on SilverPlatter, and IRIS. 
ABI/INFORM, PsycLIT, GPO on Silverplatter, 
Newspaper Abstracts OnDisc, Dissertation Abstracts 
OnDisc, the National Trade Data Bank, Census of 
Population and Housing, Toxic Chemical Release 
Inventory, and County Business Patterns are some of the 
tides on CD-ROM. 

The UNH library holdings include approximately 
300,000 volumes on the main campus. The library sub- 
scribes to hundreds of journals and uses telefacsimile and 
electronic means to transmit articles and information 
between its own and other libraries across the country. 



The main library is a U.S. Government Docu- 
ments Depository Library and selects approximately 
one third of the U.S. government yearly output to 
support UNH programs. 

UNH students may borrow materials from the 
Albertus College Library. Students who obtain a 
borrowing card from a Connecticut public library 
may borrow from other public libraries in the state. 
As a member of OCLC, UNH has access through 
interlibrary loan to the holdings of more the 40,102 
member libraries' over 48 million records. 

At Southeastern Connecticut, the UNH library 
center is housed in the full-service Mitchell College 
Library. This unique arrangement provides materials 
from the library, plus a UNH collection of over 
4,000 monographs, 125 journals and reference 
materials geared specifically for the UNH curricu- 
lum. CD-ROM products and on-line services are 
also available. 

At all sites, students are assisted by professional 
reference librarians. One-on-one consultations are 
available to locate information for research papers 
and projects. Freshmen receive instruction in how to 
use a library. Upperclass and graduate students have 
subject-specific library orientations available. 
Bibliographic instruction courses, geared to interna- 
tional students, are also provided. 

Library guides, as well as selected instructional sup- 
port resource materials, are provided; and a reserve col- 
lection is in place to support courses taught at UNH. 

Campus Store 

The university's campus store sells all necessary 
texts, new and used, required for courses at the uni- 
versity. It also carries school supplies, greeting cards, 
imprinted clothing, gifts, candy and a selection of 
newspapers and periodicals. A wide selection of soft- 
ware is available, priced at a substantial academic 
discount for currently enrolled students. 

The campus store buys back many used texts 
throughout the year; a student ID is required. It also 
handles class ring orders and film processing for the 
campus community and will be happy to place special 
orders for any books. 



The University Community 29 



Students who would like to have books and/or sup- 
plies shipped to their home or office may contact the 
bookstore at (203) 933-4000 or visit the bookstore 
website at www.efollett.com. 

Campus Copy 

Campus Copy is a full-service copy, type and 
print shop located in the basement of Maxcy Hall on 
the main campus. Campus Copy offers a variety of 
services at reasonable prices, including resume com- 
position, word processing, desktop publishing, pho- 
tocopying and binding. Campus Copy is independ- 
ently owned and operated. For more information, 
call (203) 931-9844. 

Student Center 

The newly renovated Student Center provides a 
focal point for all student activities. Offering lounges, 
student offices, a large cafeteria and a snack bar, the 
facility has been designed to serve as a center for the 
student's nonacademic college interests. 

The Sports Spot, also located in the Student 
Center, is open daily serving snacks and beverages. 
Live entertainment and films are often presented in 
the evenings. 

ELS Language Center 

One of the world-wide ELS Language Centers is 
located in Bethel Hall on the University of New 
Haven campus. The school provides instruction in 
English as a second language for a wide variety of 
purposes including preparation for university study 
and for professions requiring English proficiency. 
Courses include both Intensive and Semi-Intensive 
instruction, preparation for the TOEFL and a busi- 
ness certificate program in cooperation with UNH. 
For information, contact the ELS Language Centers 
school directly at (203) 931-3000 or at nh@els.com. 



Research and 
Professional Facilities 

Bureau for Business Research 

The Bureau for Business Research offers access to 
databases for research on products, markets, compe- 
tition and international issues. In addition, the uni- 
versity's biannual, refereed academic journal, Ameri- 
can Business Review, is published under the auspices 
of the bureau. 

UNH Foundation 

The role of the University of New Haven 
Foundation is to initiate, facilitate and participate in 
programs and projects aimed at furthering and 
improving the educational, scientific and research 
endeavors at the university. 

The entities which are administered under the aus- 
pices of the UNH Foundation are: The Center for 
Family Business, the University of New Haven Press, the 
Art Gallery and Orchestra New England. 

The University of New Haven Press publishes 
scholarly texts, monographs and academic publica- 
tions in a variety of fields including arts and sciences, 
business, criminal justice, public safet)^ and sports. The 
press also publishes The International Sports Journal 
and the American Business Review; both publications 
are refereed journals. 

The Gallery, located in Dodds Hall, offers a full sea- 
son of exhibits in all media. Orchestra New England has 
an annual series of six subscription concerts, and the 
ensemble and its members present a variety of addition- 
al concerts and programs throughout the year. 

UNH Center for Dispute Resolution 

The Center for Dispute Resolution at the 
University of New Haven is a focal point for the inter- 
disciplinary study and practice of dispute resolution. 
The Center offers conflict management services to 
individuals and to businesses, institutions, govern- 
mental agencies and community organizations. 
Services include mediation, design of conflict manage- 



30 



ment systems, consultation and training. Through 
educational programs for students and the communi- 
ry-at-large, the Center also strives to advance the 
understanding and application of alternative means of 
dispute resolution, including mediation. 

Center for Family Business 

The Center for Family Business was founded in 
1994 as a unique learning environment for family 
business members. Its mission is to help ensure the 
future and continuity of the family business, thus 
strengthening Connecticut's economy. The Center 
offers members a variety of programs which deal with 
issues faced by family businesses, regardless of the 
nature of the business. We offer our members eight 
different major programs each year, many held in ven- 
ues in both New Haven County and Fairfield County. 
These programs feature some of the top speakers in the 
field of family business and allow attendees to learn 
from one another. CFB also features small group 
forums which consist of members in complementary 
circumstances. These groups function as ad hoc advi- 
sory boards to their fellow members. We also hold 
focused programs periodically, which appeal to partic- 
ular segments of our membership. Additionally, we 
provide our members with newsletters and other fam- 
ily business educational materials. In partnership with 
UNH, CFB is sponsored by the accounting firm of 
Bailey, Shaefer & Errato; Fleet Bank, a subsidiary of 
Fleet Financial Group; MassMutual, one of the 
nation's largest life insurance and financial manage- 
ment companies; and Wiggin & Dana, a leading 
Connecticut law firm. 

The Center for Family Business will provide access 
to a national family business network and to business 
programs and services, consultations and seminars. 

Center for the Study of Crime 
Victims' Rights, Remedies 
and Resources 

The UNH Center for the Study of Crime Victims' 
Rights, Remedies and Resources is maintained under 
the auspices of the School of Public Safety and 
Professional Studies. This center will provide, and is in 



the process of developing, numerous initiatives to 
enhance the knowledge base regarding crime victim 
rights and services to assist crime victims through edu- 
cational, training and technical assistance opportuni- 
ties for the various academic disciplines and profes- 
sional groups that study, advocate for or serve victims. 

These programs and services will be statewide, re- 
gional and national in scope. They will include in- 
structional programs; field and program evaluation 
research services; internships, fellowships and visit- 
ing scholar programs; legal, legislative and public 
policy analysis and advocacy; and publications, con- 
ferences and symposia. Information is available 
through the director's office at the university. 

Institute of Gastronomy and 
CuHnary Arts 

The Institute of Gastronomy and Culinary Arts is 
housed in the Tagliatela School of Hospitality and 
Tourism. Featured among its offerings is a program 
leading to national certification in food handling recog- 
nized by the State of Connecticut as well as a certificate 
of mastery in basic techniques and theories of cooking. 
The institute serves as a focal point for programs 
designed not only for UNH students earning academic 
credits, but also for food writers, restaurant owners and 
hobbyist cooks. Information is available from the school 
office in Harugari Hall, or on the UNH website. 

University of New Haven 
Press/Academic Publications 

The UNH Press publishes scholarly texts, mono- 
graphs and academic publications in a variety of fields 
including arts and sciences, business, criminal justice, 
public safety and sports. One of its newer publications 
is The International Sports Journal. Under the auspices 
of the Bureau of Business Research, UNH Press also 
publishes the American Business Review, a biannual, 
refereed academic journal. 

The University of New Haven also publishes Essays 
in Arts and Sciences, an interdisciplinary scholarly jour- 
nal published annually since 1971 and devoted to a 
broad range of interests including literature, the arts, 
the social sciences and the natural sciences. 



Admission and Registration 31 



ADMISSION AND 
REGISTRATION 



FuU-Time Admissions 



Jane C. Sangeloty, B.A., Director of 
Undergraduate Admissions 

Call: (203) 932-7319 

Toll-free: 1-800-DIAL-UNH, ext. 7319 
(1-800-342-5864) 

The University of New Haven welcomes applica- 
tions from men and women of all races, economic lev- 
els, religions and geographic areas. 

Students wishing to take any course in the univer- 
sity, whether or not they seek a degree, must first sat- 
isfy the admission requirements and follow the admis- 
sion procedures specified below. In general, all appli- 
cants must have graduated from an accredited second- 
ary school or passed the state high school equivalency 
examination to be considered for admission. 

Students should note that the different schools of 
the university may have additional admission require- 
ments which are discussed in detail in subsequent 
pages of this catalog. 

You become a student of the University of New 
Haven only after you have completed the steps listed 
below under Admission Procedure, selected and regis- 
tered for courses for your first semester, and made the 
appropriate tuition and fee payments. 

Admission Procedure: 

New Full-Time Students/ Freshmen 

• Secure an application form from the Undergrad- 
uate Admissions Office of the university or from 
your high school guidance counselor, or on-line at 
www. newhaven. edu. 

• Submit the completed form with the non- 
refundable application fee. 



• Request your secondary school to forward an offi- 
cial copy of your academic transcript directly to the 
Admissions Office. If you are currently attending 
an educational institution and will be sending us an 
incomplete transcript, it is your responsibilit)' to 
send us your final transcript as soon as it becomes 
available. 

• Arrange for results of Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(SAT) or American College Testing Program 
(ACT) examinations to be sent directly to the 
Undergraduate Admissions Office. 

• Submit the required student essay. 

• Provide a minimum of one letter of 
recommendation. 

• A decision on an application will not be made until 
we receive: a completed application and application 
fee, high school and college (if applicable) tran- 
scripts and admission test scores, student essay and 
letter(s) of recommendation. If necessary, recom- 
mendations and/or a personal interview may be 
requested. The university requires all accepted stu- 
dents to submit a nonrefundable enrollment deposit 
in order to facilitate their registration. The deposit is 
applied toward the tuition and ensures them of 
placement with the incoming class, when submitted 
on or before the due date of May 1 . Students enter- 
ing in January must also submit the nonrefundable 
enrollment deposit by January 1st. 

Please note: Further information on tuition, room 
and board, and other charges are located elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

Admission Procedure: 
Full-Time Transfer Students 

The university admits transfer students for both fall 
and spring semesters. The procedure for transfer stu- 
dents to follow when applying to the university is: 

• Complete an Undergraduate admission application 



32 



and return it to the Undergraduate Admissions 
Office with the nonrefundable application fee. 

• Arrange to have official transcripts from all col- 
leges/universities attended forwarded to the 
Undergraduate Admissions Office. 

• An official copy of your secondary school transcript, 
including date of graduation, must also be submitted. 
A satisfactory General Equivalency Diploma (GED) 
is acceptable in place of a high school diploma. 

• Students who have completed less than one full 
year (30 semester hours) of college level work must 
submit official test scores of the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) or American College Test (ACT). 
Students who have completed more than one full 
year of college level work are not usually required to 
submit standardized test scores. However, the 
Admissions Office reserves the right to request this 
information if necessary. 

• In most cases, transfer students will receive a tentative 
transfer credit evaluation at the time of acceptance. 
To help expedite the evaluation procedure, we ask 
that you forward a current catalog from all institu- 
tions attended with your application materials. 

Admission Procedure: 
International Students 

The university admits international students for 
both fall and spring semesters. Official academic tran- 
scripts from all institutions previously attended, 
including secondary school, must accompany the 
admission application. Applicants whose native lan- 
guage is not English must take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 500 
is required. 

Students who have been educated in English-speak- 
ing systems may substitute the SAT or ACT for the 
TOEFL. Depending on their academic background, 
students transferring from accredited institutions 
within the United States may also be required to sub- 
mit TOEFL scores. Verification of financial support 
also must accompany the admission application. 

Academically qualified applicants who do not meet 
the English language proficiency requirements can 
choose to complete an intensive English program 



approved by the University of New Haven. The uni- 
versity has an agreement with the ELS Language 
Center (ELS) located on our campus. 

If a student chooses to attend this program, one 
Certificate of Eligibility (1-20 or IAP-66) will be issued 
to include both English language training at ELS and 
undergraduate study at the University of New Haven. 
For more information about the program, please con- 
tact the Director of International Admissions. 



Undergraduate Admission Policy 

Students are admitted full-time (five-course or 
four-course, 12-15 credit enrollment and registration 
load), or part-time (up to 1 1 credits). Acceptances are 
customized and students are placed according to their 
academic needs. Accepting a student as fully matricu- 
lated or as conditionally admitted takes into consider- 
ation: GPA, SAT or ACT scores, rank in class, recom- 
mendation and essay. 



Conditional Admission 

There are a limited number of openings in the uni- 
versity for students who appear to have potential for 
academic success that has not been realized. At the dis- 
cretion of the Director of Undergraduate Admissions, 
such students may be granted conditional admission 
to the university. 

In order to assist students to be successfiil, students 
granted conditional admission may be required to take 
certain courses designed to strengthen their founda- 
tion in basic skills and prepare them for regular college 
courses. Such students will also be limited to four 
courses during their first semester. See the 
Developmental Studies Program section for more 
information. 



Placement 

Incoming students are placed in courses in English 
and mathematics according to their individual abilities 
as demonstrated through the university testing pro- 
gram, SAT or ACT scores and high school or previous 
college records. 



Admission and Registration 33 



Some students may be placed in courses designed to 
upgrade their skills in particular subject areas and pre- 
pare them for more advanced courses at the university. 



Deferred Enrollment 

Students who are offered admission to the Univer- 
sity of New Haven may choose to defer enrollment for 
up to one full year from the originally intended semes- 
ter of entrance. Students may enroll in college-level 
courses at another accredited college or university dur- 
ing this time period with the approval of the Director 
of Undergraduate Admissions. Students must notify 
the Undergraduate Admissions Office in writing prior 
to the beginning of the semester for which they were 
accepted if they intend to defer their enrollment. 
Students must submit a new undergraduate admission 
application. 

Part-Time Admissions 

The part-time Evening Division provides the op- 
portunity for both returning adults and traditional-age 
students to pursue specific program certificates and 
associate's or bachelor's degrees without the hours per 
week and financial constraints that full-time study 
requires. The degrees conferred by the university are 
identical for both full- and part-time students, with no 
distinction made for programs completed by part-time 
study alone. 

Students enrolled in the part-time Evening Division 
may register for 1 to 11 credit hours per semester. 



Admission Requirements 

Generally, graduates of accredited high schools or 
secondary schools or persons who have a state high 
school equivalency diploma are eligible for admission. 

Information regarding the examination for the state 
high school equivalency diploma may be obtained by 
contacting the Connecticut State Department of 
Education. 

In some cases requiring special permission, a person 
who has completed at least two years of second- 



ary/high school with a satisfactory record may be per- 
mitted to register for undergraduate courses as a non- 
matriculated student provided that appropriate scores 
on the university's placement tests or other prerequi- 
site requirements have been met. 

With the exception of auditors, all other students 
taking any course, whether for a degree or not, must 
meet admission requirements. 

Applicants are required to take placement tests 
including mechanics of English and mathematics. 
Scholastic Aptitude Tests or ACT may be required for 
admission as a part-time student. Applicants who have 
completed 30 or more credit hours of work with a "C" 
average or better from an approved, regionally accred- 
ited college or university may be exempt from taking 
placement tests depending on the subject matter of the 
credit-hour coursework. 



Credit for Prior Learning 

It is recognized that many adult students have 
acquired knowledge through approaches other than 
formal coursework. A variety of procedures exist to 
measure and validate such academic achievement. 
Students should contact the Undergraduate 
Admissions Office for the latest information on cred- 
iting procedures. 

Some commonly used procedures are: 

Transfer Credits 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

Proficiency Examination Program (ACT PEP) 

Advanced Placement (AP) 

Dantes Subject Standardized Tests (DSST) 

Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) 

Credit by Examination 

Modern Language Association Foreign 

Language Proficiency Tests (MLA) 

Military Service School Courses 



Admission Procedure 

Applicants who seek part-time admission should 
contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office in Bayer 
Hall for specific details. 



34 

Full-Xime Recistration ^- ^^^ nonrefundable enrollment deposit has 

been paid. 

Registration is the process of selecting classes each 

r, • • • 1 J f 1 J • • I- 2. Tuition in full for the semester has been received, 
term. Registration includes raculty advising, a prelim- 

1 . r 1 J r CI- Students relying; on financial aid to cover all or 

inary choice or classes and ree payment, hinal registra- , 

1 1 L part of a semesters expenses must present evi- 

tion is not complete without these steps. j r i r 

dence of the amount of money awarded. No new 

Students have assigned faculty advisers who provide p^rt-time student will be allowed to register for 

guidance on academic matters and help students with ^j^^^^^ ^^^^1 ^^-^-^^ payment or financial aid 

the registration process. Normally, the adviser is the arrangements have been made, 
chair or coordinator of the student's major course of 

study or another faculty member designated by the 

^1 „• Course Overload Restrictions: Full-Time Students 
chair. 

There are two parts to registration: the completion Full-time students who wish to register for more 

of the registration forms and the payment of tuition. ^^^^ ^^ semester hours in any one semester must fol- 

There may be a penalty fee for delaying either of these ^^^ ^P^^^^^ procedures and guidelines, 

two processes beyond the end of the registration peri- If the total number of courses to be attempted is 6 

od and/or tuition due date. and is in excess of the hours specified on the student's 

Registration dates and procedures for currently worksheet, the student must obtain written permission 

enrolled full-time students will be posted in advance. ^'"""^ ^'' ""' ^^' ^^''''^' ^^^ department chair and, in 

A separate registration is required for each of the "^°" instances, must have a cumulative quality point 

semesters, for summer sessions, for the winter interses- ^^^^^ o j. u ot ig er. 

sion and for the accelerated modules. If the total number of courses to be attempted is 

All new students who have paid the enrollment "^^""^ ^^^^ ^' '^^ ^^"^^"^ "''''' ^^^^^i" ^■'"^^^ P^'^"^^^' 

deposit will be mailed information about registration. ^'^^ ^""""^ ^'^ o^ ^^' ^^1^'^^^' department chair and aca- 

Prior to the start of the fall and spring semesters, an ^^"^^^ ^^^"- S"'^^ ^^"^^"^^ ^'^ ■^^^^^''^^ t° ^^""^ ^ 

orientation/registration program is held at which time cumulative quality point ratio of 3.20 or higher. 

new students will select their courses. 

Social Security numbers will be used on student Part-Time Re<ri<Jtriitinn 

records; students should be sure to bring their number 

when registering. Prospective students who do not New or former students may register in person at 

have a U.S. Social Security number should apply for the Undergraduate Admissions Office. Currently 

one before registration. Students from other countries enrolled students may register by mail prior to the an- 

who do not have U.S. Social Security numbers will be nounced deadline. A separate registration is required 

given a temporary number by the university, however, for each academic term students wish to attend, 

they are encouraged to apply for a U.S. Social Security Auditors follow the same procedure and pay the same 

number as soon as possible. tuition and fees as students enrolled for credit. 

In conjunction with academic advisers, students are 

urged to plan their programs carefully before complet- r» r '-r' • • J t-' 

■ u ■ ■ c ■ J juj 1 avment or luition and fees 

ing the registration rorms in order to avoid the need •' 

for requesting changes. Once the registration is com- The student completes the registration procedure 

pleted, students must use signed drop/add cards to by paying tuition and fees. There may be a penalty for 

make a change. delaying either process beyond the end of the registra- 

Please note: No new full-time student will be per- '■^*-*" penod. 

mitted to register for classes until: Students are urged to plan their programs carefully 

before completing registration forms to avoid the need 



Admission and Registration 35 



for changes. Once the registration process has been 
completed, a change of registration requires the use of 
drop/add cards. 

Course Overload Restrictions: Part-Time and 
UNH-Southeastern Students 

Part-time and UNH-Southeastern students are 
restricted to a maximum of 1 1 credit hours in any 
given term or semester including the combined ses- 
sions of summer school. 

Students wishing to take more than 1 1 credit hours 
per term or semester must complete the Internal 
Transfer Form in order to change student status to that 
of a full-time day student. Full-Time Division tuition 
rates would then apply. 

In some limited circumstances, part-time students 
nearing graduation may be allowed to exceed the 1 1 
credit hour per term policy. 

Only students who satisfy the following criteria will 
be eligible: 

1 . 1 2 or more credit hours must be needed for grad- 
uation and successful completion of the registered 
courses in one term would enable graduation. 

2. Only courses required for graduation are included. 

3. Part-time status was continuously maintained 
during the previous semester. 

Students must apply for this credit overload by 
obtaining the appropriate form from the office of the 
Undergraduate Registrar and securing the necessary 
approvals. 



Alumni Audits 

Alumni who audit courses pay a reduced tuition, 
but must be cleared through the Alumni Office before 
registering. Auditing courses at this reduced rate is 
limited to courses at or below the level of the degree 
earned by the student at UNH. 



Certificates 

Students can take their first step toward an under- 
graduate degree by registering for certificates at the 



University of New Haven. 

Each certificate is carefully designed as an intro- 
duction to a particular course of study. Later, students 
may choose to apply the credits they have earned 
toward an undergraduate degree. 

Each certificate consists of a series of courses-of 
15 credit hours or more in a specialized area. A mini- 
mum of one-half of the credit hours must be complet- 
ed in residence. 



Summer Sessions 

Day and evening undergraduate courses are offered 
during the summer in a series of sessions ranging from 
four to eleven weeks in length. The first session begins 
shortly after the close of the spring semester. Resident 
dormitory students may therefore contiriue their stud- 
ies uninterrupted through the entire summer. 

The university welcomes visiting students from 
other colleges and universities who wish to transfer 
summer course credits back to their institutions. 
Credits earned at the University of New Haven are 
generally accepted by other schools, but students are 
urged to consult with their home institutions for any 
special requirements or procedures for credit transfer. 

University of New Haven students can attend one 
or more of the UNH summer sessions to lighten their 
study load during the regular academic year, to reduce 
the time required for a degree, to prepare for other 
courses, to make up courses or to take additional work 
beyond that required for a degree and still complete a 
program on schedule. 

A list of courses offered during the summer is avail- 
able in April. 



Intersession Courses 

A number of undergraduate courses are offered 
during the period between the fall and spring semes- 
ters. These courses blend both traditional and innova- 
tive methods of instruction, including team teaching, 
field trips, lectures, laboratory work and research proj- 
ects. A list of courses offered during intersession is 
available in November. 



36 



UNH in Southeastern 
Connecticut 

The University of New Haven has been providing 
quality undergraduate and graduate educational 
opportunities for residents in southeastern 
Connecticut and southern Rhode Island for more than 
a quarter-century. 

The UNH Southeastern currently houses its 
administrative offices in Mitchell Hall on the 
Mitchell College campus in New London (mailing 
address: 469 Pequot Ave., New London, CT 06320). 
UNH students are able take advantage of Mitchell 
College's 64-acre campus, dining hall, bookstore, 
library, and technology center. 

The UNH Southeastern administrative center 
accommodates registration, student orientation and 
advisement. Classes, other than the Saturday M.B.A., 
meet in the evening to accommodate the schedules of 
working adults. 

UNHSE Undergraduate Curricula 

At the undergraduate level, a Paralegal Certificate is 
offered, as well as classes leading to a bachelor of sci- 
ence degree in General Engineering. 

The Paralegal Certificate program is a cohort, full, 
credit-bearing program where the same group of stu- 
dents starts and finishes the program together. The 
students take two courses per trimester at UNH 
Southeastern and complete the Paralegal Certificate in 
just 9 months. 

The following six courses are required to obtain the 
Paralegal Certificate: LS 100 Introduction to Legal 
Concepts, LS 238/239 Civil Procedure I and II, LS 
240/241 Legal Research and Writing I and II, and LS 
330 Legal Investigation. 

The Bachelor of Science in General Engineering is 

intended for those interested in a career involving 
engineering knowledge without the prescribed require- 
ments of a specific engineering discipline. It is 
designed for those interested in advancing in the engi- 
neering or technical fields and provides complete flex- 



ibility for a student to combine engineering with any 
other undergraduate discipline within the university. 

UNH Southeastern offers this program in a format 
where the students will complete all major subject 
requirements at UNH Southeastern; students will sat- 
isfy all university core curriculum requirements by tak- 
ing the core required courses at any accredited institu- 
tion. Students may also obtain credit for prior college 
learning and/or military experience. 

Graduate Curricula at UNHSE 

Graduate offerings include the Master of Science in 
Education leading to teacher certification, and the fol- 
lowing cohort groups in which students proceed 
through the degree as a group: the Saturday M.B.A., 
the Executive M.S. in Engineering Management and 
the M.S. in Computer Science as described below. 
Complete information is available in the university's 
Graduate Catalog or on the UNH website at 
ivww.newhaven.edu in the Graduate School section. 

The Saturday M.B.A. in New London is offered in 
a cohort format conducive to a busy lifestyle, allowing 
completion of the degree quickly, in 22 months, with- 
out sacrificing quality. 

The Executive Master of Science in Engineering 
Management is designed to meet the needs of engi- 
neering and technical professionals in a cohort pro- 
gram that develops and enhances engineering manage- 
ment skills. 

The Accelerated Master of Science in Computer 
Science cohort program includes a 12-credit certificate 
in Computer Programming, provides advanced profes- 
sional training in computer science, can be used to 
enter or advance in the field, and requires no prior 
coursework or experience in computer science. 

The Master of Science in Education can be pur- 
sued as a part-time evening student or as a full- 
time intern. This program prepares students for 
Connecticut certification as well as providing graduate 
study for teachers already certified who may be seeking 
additional certifications or who want to enhance their 
credentials in the practice of teaching and/or educa- 
tion research. 



UNHSE Student Council 

Established to provide an important link between 
the students and the university, the UNH 
Southeastern Student Council plans social functions 
and provides an annual scholarship award to a south- 
eastern Connecticut student who enrolls at the main 
campus in West Haven. 



Admission and Registration 37 



Servicemembers Opportunity 
Colleges 

UNH-Southeastern has been designated as an 
institutional member of Servicemembers Opportunity 
Colleges (SOC), a consortium of national higher edu- 
cation associations providing voluntary postsecondary 
education to members of the military throughout the 
world. As a member of SOC, UNH-Southeastern rec- 
ognizes the unique nature of the military lifestyle and 
has committed itself to easing the transfer of relevant 
course credits, providing flexible academic residency 
requirements and crediting learning from appropriate 
military training and experiences. SOC has been 
developed jointly by educational representatives of 
each of the Armed Services, the Office of the Secretary 
of Defense and a consortium of 12 leading national 
higher education associations; it is sponsored by the 
American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities (AASCU) and the American Association 
of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC). 



38 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



Ways of Earning Credit 

Academic Credit 

Transfer of Credit to the University 

Courses Available at Other Colleges 

Coordinated Courses 

Advanced Placement 

Credit by Examination 

External Credit Examinations 

Advanced Study 

Independent Study 

Field Experiences 

Academic Status and Progress 

Full-Time Students 

Part-Time Students 

Matriculation 

Academic Worksheets 

Class 

Transfer of Student Status 

Major 

Minor 

Grading System 

Grade Reports 

Quality Point Ratio 

Satisfactory Progress 

Dean's List 

Probation and Dismissal 

Repetition of Work 

Dismissal/Readmission Procedure 

Readmission 

Changes 

Dropping/ Adding a Class 

Withdrawal from a Class 

Changing a Major 

Leave of Absence 

Withdrawal from the University 

Transfer of Credit from the University 

General Policies 

Academic Honesty 



Attendance Regulations 
Coursework Expectations 
Make-up Policy 

Graduation 

Graduation Criteria 
Residency Requirement 
Writing Proficiency Examination 
Honors 

Ways of Earning Credit 
Academic Credit 

Academic credit is granted on a credit hour basis. 
In addition to successfully completing regular courses, 
students may earn credit by taking independent study, 
coordinated courses, crediting exams or CLEP exams, 
or by transferring previously awarded credit from 
other institutions. These methods are detailed in the 
following pages of this section. 

Transfer of Credit to the University 

Students may transfer to the university after com- 
pleting academic work at other institutions. 
Applications should be made to the Director of 
Admissions. If feasible, potential transfer students 
should visit the university and discuss their transfer 
credit situation with the chair or dean administering 
the program of interest. Normally, the university 
accepts credit from regionally accredited colleges on an 
equivalency basis. The regional institutional accredita- 
tion bodies in the U.S. are: Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Schools, New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools, Northwest Association of 
Schools and Colleges, Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools, and Western Association of 
Schools and Colleges. 



Academic Regulations 39 



Students transferring from another institution 
must possess at least a 2.00 quality point ratio based 
on a four-point scale. Credit is normally granted for 
those courses completed with at least a grade oi C, or 
its equivalent. Credit is not awarded for pass/fail 
courses. Credit transferred from a two-year institution 
is generally limited to 60 credit hours and generally 
restricted to freshman- and sophomore-level courses, 
unless otherwise approved in writing by the dean of 
the school in which the student seeks to enroll. 

When a student's application is complete, a tentative 
analysis is made of transfer credit available. Then final 
decisions on transfer credit are made by department 
chairs and must conform to school and university poli- 
cies. Prospective students may be required to take qual- 
ifying or placement examinations for specific courses. 

Plans of study for a University of New Haven 
degree should be agreed upon by both the transfer stu- 
dent and the department early in the first term of 
attendance in order to avoid course duplication and 
academic discontinuity. 

Engineering transfer students may be classified as 
either Engineering or Pre- Engineering, based on previous 
preparation. See the section on admission criteria for 
new transfer students in the School of Engineering and 
Applied Science section of this catalog. 

For Transfer of Student Status, see following pages. 

Courses Available at Other Colleges 

University of New Haven students interested in 
taking courses at other colleges and universities should 
discuss this matter directly with their departments and 
consult the statement of policy established by the 
undergraduate school in which they are enrolled. 

Coordinated Courses 

In order to maintain continuity in a degree pro- 
gram, students are encouraged to use UNH Summer 
Sessions and Winter Intersession; however, courses 
taken by matriculated UNH students at regionally 
accredited institutions may be designated as "coordi- 
nated courses. " Credit for such courses is accepted and 
posted on students' permanent records and the grades 
are included in students' quality point ratios. 



Credit for courses taken at a two-year institution is 
restricted to equivalent UNH courses at the freshman 
and sophomore levels. (Students with junior or high- 
er standing at UNH may not take coordinated cours- 
es at two-year institutions.) Care should be taken in 
requesting coordinated course credit for courses given 
during intensive terms. It is UNH policy that intensive 
terms should span at least 1 5 meeting days. 

Prior authorization for a "coordinated course" desig- 
nation must be obtained from the department(s) hous- 
ing the student's major and the analogous course at 
UNH. The appropriate form must be obtained at the 
Registrar's Office, approved, and returned to that office 
before the course in question begins. Normally, approval 
is only granted for those courses which are analogous to 
courses ofiFered at UNH and/or are standard courses in a 
given discipline and unavailable at UNH because of fre- 
quency of offerings, cancellation, etc., or inaccessible to 
the student because of temporary residency at a distant 
location. Complete detailed instructions can be found 
on the Coordinated Course form. 

Students must be continuously matriculated at 
UNH while taking a coordinated course. Approval for 
a coordinated course will become void upon with- 
drawal or dismissal of the student. 

Students are responsible for securing an official 
transcript upon completion of their work. Official 
transcripts must be mailed directly to the Office of the 
Registrar at UNH. 

Advanced Placement 

The university recognizes the program of advanced 
placement available to talented high school students and 
operated by the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Students satisfactorily completing advanced placement 
courses in high school and the final examination pre- 
pared by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) may be 
given appropriate college credit if their courses are simi- 
lar to those ofl^ered at the University of New Haven. 

Educational Testing Service Advanced Placement 
examinations are graded from 1 to 5. Credit may be 
allowed where the grade earned is 3, 4 or 5. Students 
desiring to submit advanced placement courses for col- 
lege credit should have all results of these courses and tests 
sent in with their application to the Admissions Office. 



40 



The University of New Haven accepts credit by 
examination from the College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) subject to academic department 
chair approval. 

The passing percentile for CLEP and subject exam- 
inations is 50. Credit will be evaluated by the appro- 
priate department chair. 

Credit by Examination 

A student who has at least a 2.00 cumulative QPR 
and has independent knowledge of the content of an 
undergraduate course offered by the university may, 
with the approval of the respective department chair 
and dean, take a special crediting examination in lieu 
of taking the course. 

Students are reminded that they must earn at 
least 30 semester hours through regular coursework 
if they are to meet the residency requirements for 
graduation. 

Students may not take crediting examinations 
during the first semester in which they are enrolled. 

External Credit Examinations 

Learning which has been acquired through many 
traditional and nontraditional approaches can be 
measured and validated by objective procedures 
acceptable to the faculty of UNH. This learning must 
appropriately parallel the curriculum of the university 
in order to be awarded UNH credit. 

The Admissions Office maintains a current listing 
of organizations who provide testing and other alter- 
native credit procedures. The following list cites some 
of the more common sources: 

College- Level Examination Program (CLEP): This 
testing program offers two types of examinations: 
(1) the general examinations in the five comprehen- 
sive areas of English composition, humanities, social 
sciences/history, natural sciences and mathematics, 
and (2) the subject examinations. The subject exam- 
inations range in value from three to six credits and 
are achievement tests in a wide variety of undergrad- 
uate college courses, primarily at the basic level. For 
information, contact CLEP, ETS, Princeton, NJ 
0854L 



Proficiency Examination Program (ACT PEP): This 
program may also be used to earn credits in certain ac- 
ademic areas. For information write ACT PEP 
Coordinator, ACT Proficiency Examination Program, 
RO. Box 168, Iowa City, lA 52243. 

Dantes Subject Standardized Tests (DSST): This is a 
program administered by Educational Testing Services 
(ETS) in conjunction with DANTES. The examina- 
tions are available to all military personnel. For informa- 
tion contact the Base Education Services Officer. ETS 
has made these examinations available to civilians. 
Civilians should contact the Program Administrator, 
DSST, ETS, Princeton, NJ 08541. 

Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC): The 
University of New Haven is a member of the SOC 
Bachelor Degrees for Soldiers (BDFS) Network. This 
network is open to members of the armed services and 
their spouses. For information contact the Admissions 
Office or the Base Education Services Officer. 

Modern Language Association Foreign Language 
Proficiency Tests (MLA): The MLA comprehensive 
tests are available in French, German, Italian, Russian 
and Spanish. Undergraduate students may take 
Battery A of the examination only. Battery A includes 
speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehen- 
sion components. 

Military Service School Courses: The university may 
also accept as transfer credit certain courses completed 
during in-service training. Veterans should request 
that official transcripts of in-service training be sent to 
the Admissions Office at the university. 

Army, Navy or Coast Guard veterans should write to: 

National Personnel Records Center, Military 
Personnel Records, 9700 Page Boulevard, St. Louis, 
MO 63132. 

Marine Corps veterans should write to: Comman- 
dant, U.S. Marine Corps (Code DGK) Headquarters, 
U.S. Marine Corps, Washington, DC 20308. 

Air Force veterans should write to: Community 
College of the Air Force, Maxwell Air Force Base, 
Montgomery, AL 361 12. 



Academic Regulations 41 



Enrollees on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces 
should arrange for DD Form 295 "Application for the 
Evaluation of Educational Experiences During Military 
Service" to be completed and forwarded to the 
Admissions Office from the duty station. Veterans of any 
period of active service should provide the university 
with a copy of DD Form 214 or other notice of separa- 
tion for each period of service. This may assist in identi- 
fying possible sources of academic credit. 

Advanced Study 

Advanced study courses are offered to qualified stu- 
dents in the departments offering the degrees of bach- 
elor of science or bachelor of arts. These courses may 
include a thesis, tutorial work or independent study 
which permits the student to work intensively in areas 
of special interest. 

Independent Study 

In all courses of independent study the student and 
an adviser must jointly file a project outline with the reg- 
istrar within four weeks of the beginning of the course. 
This outline shall serve as the basis for determining sat- 
isfactory completion of course requirements. 

Normally, independent study is restricted to no 
more than six credits and only open to seniors, juniors 
and exceptionally qualified sophomores. Students 
must have at least a 3.0 quality point ratio. 

Regularly scheduled courses, that is, those offered 
at least once every four semesters, are not normally 
acceptable as independent study. 

Field Experiences 

In all courses of field experience, including intern- 
ships, practical theses and work study, students will 
earn credit for the learning gained through the activi- 
ty. The student and adviser must jointly file a project 
outline with the registrar within four weeks of the 
beginning of the course. This outline shall serve as the 
basis for establishing the mechanism by which the 
adviser will evaluate the learning which would occur, 
and thus for determining completion of course 
requirements. Please consult the academic deans to 
determine any restrictions. 



Academic Status and Progress 

Full-Time Students 

Full-time student status is attained by registering 
for a minimum of 12 charge credits per semester, or 
equivalent term, on either a matriculated or non- 
matriculated basis. Such status is continued to a suc- 
ceeding term provided a minimum of 12 credits are 
completed in the term of record. Completion is 
defined as receipt of a letter grade of A+ through 
D-, F, S or U; other letter grades do not signify 
course completion. 

Full-time students are eligible for all daytime stu- 
dent activities and benefits, and are subject to Full- 
Time Division tuition charges and other relevant fees. 
It is assumed that full-time students will select the 
great majority, if not all, of their courses from daytime 
course schedules, unless needed courses are unavailable 
during the day. 

Part-Time Students 

Students who register for 1 through 1 1 charge cred- 
its during a semester maintain part-time status. Part- 
time status may be held by students attending UNH 
during the day or in the evening. 

Matriculation 

Matriculation is the formal act of registering to 
study for a specific degree offered by the university. 
Matriculation is, therefore, not automatic. A student 
must request matriculation by seeking admission to a 
specific university degree program. Formal acceptance 
into a degree program shall constitute the granting of 
matriculation. (For engineering students, see the 
description of the Pre-Engineering and Engineering 
program levels in the School of Engineering and 
Applied Science section of this catalog.) 

Students seeking credit to be transferred to another 
institution, or who wish simply to audit courses or to 
take them without working toward a degree, need not 
matriculate. Nonmatriculated students must register 
to take their chosen courses, however, and will be 
allowed to enroll in courses only as space permits. It is 



42 

the student's responsibility to seek matriculation Transfer of Student Status 

should he or she later decide to pursue a University of . t i i i i ■ i i • 

^j jj , Undergraduate students are able to change their 

New Haven degree. , ,. i r n ■ i 

° student status according to the rollowing procedure: 

Day to Evening Transfer. Full-time students who 
Acaaemic Worksneets ^j^l^ ^^ become part-time students may do so by obtain- 
Generally, matriculating students are and remain ing the Internal Transfer Form in the Registrar's Office, 
subject to those requirements defined in the under- Upon approval, this form is then returned to the 
graduate catalog and listed on the academic worksheet Registrar for processing and registration of courses, 
in effect for the semester of initial enrollment. Please note: Part-time students are generally 
If students change academic majors, they shall be restricted to taking courses in the evening and may not 
subject to the requirements of the catalog/worksheet exceed 1 1 credit hours per term, 
in effect at the time of the change. Evening to Day Transfer. Part-time students who 
If students withdraw or are dismissed from the uni- desire to take more than 1 1 credit hours per term must 
versity and decide to return at a later date, they shall become full-time students. This process requires the 
be subject to the requirements of the catalog/work- student to obtain the Internal Transfer Form from the 
sheet in effect at the time of their return. Registrar's Office. Upon approval, the form is then 
Part-time students are permitted a total of three brought to the Registrar's Office for processing and 
semesters (consecutive or otherwise) break in study registration oi courses, 
during which time they may continue on the original 
academic worksheet. After the three-semester limit has Major 

been reached, students will then be subject to the „ i • i i i i • -r 

^ . 1 ; 1 1 • rr iiach matriculated Student must designate a specir- 

requirements or the new catalog/worksheet in errect at . , ,, , ■ -kT • 

. . " ic degree program, called a major. Major program 



time. 



requirements are detailed in the catalog under the rel- 

If students initiate a leave of absence, they shall evant department listing. A minimum cumulative 2.0 

continue on the same academic worksheet upon QpR [^ major courses is required for graduation. See 

return to the university at the conclusion of the leave. program requirements for fijrther clarification of spe- 

However, students who fail to return after the desig- ^ific courses/requirements, 
nated leave of absence period shall be considered with- 
drawn students and subject to the same requirements 

as oudined above. Minor 

Students who begin their studies based on a cata- ^^ny baccalaureate programs have an associated 

log/worksheet which subsequently changes may initi- "^i^^'' P^gram, which normally includes five or six 

ate a request to use the most current worksheet for courses. The university encourages students to augment 

that major; however, students are not required to ^heir major program with an associated minor. Details 

switch to the current worksheet when a change can be obtained from the appropriate department, 
occurs unless they have been away from the universi- A worksheet for the minor, developed by the appro- 

ty as described above. priate department, must be submitted to the registrar's 

office in order to receive credit for the minor. 

Class 

In order to be classified as a sophomore, a student ^ ^^ 5 oysie 
must have completed 27 credit hours in an approved The following grading system is in use since 
program; a junior, 57 credit hours; a senior, 87 credit September 1, 1987 and, except where otherwise spec- 
hours; a fifth-year student, 117 credit hours. ified, applies both to examinations and to term work. 

The weight of a final examination grade is a matter 



Academic Regulations 43 



individually determined by each instructor. See 
Quality Point Ratio section following for additional 
information. 



= 4.3 quality points 
= 4.0 quality points 
- 3.7 quality points 
= 3.3 quality points 
= 3.0 quality points 
= 2.7 quality points 
= 2.3 quality points 
= 2.0 quality points 
= 1.7 quality points 
= 1.3 quality points 
= 1.0 quality points 



A+ -Excellent 
A -Excellent 
A- -Excellent 
B+ -Good 
B -Good 
B- -Good 
C+ -Fair 
C -Fair 
C- -Fair 
D+ -Poor 
D -Poor 
D- -Poor, lowest 

passing grade = 0.7 quality points 

F —Failure = quality points 

AU -Audit. Indicates course was attended without 

expectation of credit or grade. 
I -Incomplete =0 quality points 

Indicates one of the following two possibilities: 

1. Some work remains to be completed to gain 
academic credit for the course. An I is assigned 
in the first instance at the discretion of the 
instructor. This assignment shall not be auto- 
matic but shall be based upon an evaluation of 
the student's work completed up to that point 
and an assessment of the student's ability to 
complete course requirements within the 
allowed time limit. Work to remove an I must 
be performed within the 12 months following 
the last day of the semester in which the I is 
incurred or earlier if the instructor so requires. 
When such work is completed, the instructor 
will assign a final grade for the course. 

2. The student has failed to complete unfulfilled 
academic assignments within the specified 12 
months, and the grade of I has been entered on 
the student's permanent transcript. No further 
opportunity to complete the course will be 
available to the student after this time. 

DNA -Did Not Attend. Indicates nonattendance in a 
course for which a student had previously regis- 
tered but not officially dropped. (0 quality 
points). 



W -Withdrawal. Indicates withdrawal from the 

course after the first half of the semester, or 
withdrawal from the university after the 
twelfth week of classes. The grade of W will 
not be assigned to any student who has taken 
the final examination in the course. (0 quality 
points). 

S —Satisfactory. Given only in noncredit courses. (0 
quality points). 

U —Unsatisfactory. Given only in noncredit 
courses. (0 quality points). 

Grade Reports 

Reports of the final grade in each subject will be 
mailed to the student soon after the close of each 
semester. 

Grade reports may be withheld from students who 
have delinquent accounts with the Business Office, 
Security, Library, Housing, Athletics, Health Services 
or the Campus Bookstore. 

Quality Point Ratio 

The academic standing of each student is deter- 
mined on the basis of the quality point ratio earned 
each semester. The quality point ratio (QPR) is deter- 
mined by using the quality points assigned to each stu- 
dent's grade. 

The quality point value for each grade earned dur- 
ing a semester is multiplied by the number of credit 
hours assigned to that course as listed elsewhere in this 
catalog. The sum of these points is the total number of 
quality points earned during the semester. 

This sum is divided by the number of credit hours 
attempted (hours from courses with grades of A+ 
through F) to obtain the quality point ratio. 

The cumulative quality point ratio is obtained by 
calculating the quality point ratio for all courses 
attempted at the University of New Haven. Course 
grades of AU, DNA, I, S, U and W are non-punitive 
grades. They are not calculated in the overall QPR 
since they carry no quality points. 

See the previous "Grading System" section for more 
information. 



44 



Satisfactory Progress 

For students matriculated in the Full-Time Divi- 
sion, satisfactory progress toward a degree is defined 
as successful completion of 24 credits applicable to 
that degree program during an academic year. This 
should include registration for at least 12 credits per 
semester and successful completion of at least nine 
credits per semester. "Completion" is defined as the 
receipt of a final letter grade (A+ to F) but not the 
receipt of a Withdrawal (W), Did Not Attend 
(DNA) or an Incomplete (I). "Successful comple- 
tion" is defined as the receipt of a passing letter grade 
(A+ to D-). Decisions on student status are made by 
the Registrar. 

Students are required to maintain a minimum 
cumulative quality point ratio in accordance with the 
following scale: 

Quality point ratio of 1.50 for 3 to 30 credit hours 

attempted 
Quality point ratio of 1.60 for 31 to 45 credit hours 

attempted 
Quality point ratio of 1.70 for 46 to 60 credit hours 

attempted 
Quality point ratio of 1.80 for 61 to 75 credit hours 

attempted 
Quality point ratio of 1.90 for 76 to 90 credit hours 

attempted 
Quality point ratio of 2.00 for 91 or more credit 

hours attempted 

Appeals involving extenuating circumstances may 
be addressed to the chair of the Faculty Senate for 
resolution by appropriate Faculty Senate committees. 

Dean's List 

The dean's list honors students who demonstrate 
excellence in their academic performance. Full-time 
students who earn a quality point ratio of 3.50 or bet- 
ter in any one semester will be appointed to the dean's 
list for that semester. 

Part-time students who have accumulated a mini- 
mum of 14 credit hours of coursework at the universi- 
ty will automatically be considered for the dean's list at 
the end of each semester. A cumulative quality point 
ratio of 3.50 or better is required. 



Probation and Dismissal 

Failure to maintain satisfactory progress as defined 
previously will place students on academic probation 
for the following semester of enrollment. Students are 
automatically dismissed when they receive a third pro- 
bation (or, if readmitted from a previous dismissal, any 
subsequent probation) or when their quality point 
ratio for any one semester is less than 1.0. 

First-semester freshmen earning a quality point ratio 
less than 1.0 are automatically referred to the Academic 
Standing and Admissions Committee which may spec- 
ify conditions for continued enrollment. A record of 
committee action shall appear on the student's perma- 
nent record. 

Students who fail to maintain the minimum QPR 
for satisfactory progress, but are not dismissed, are 
placed on academic probation. Probation serves as a 
warning that lack of improvement will eventually pre- 
vent satisfaction of graduation requirements. Because 
UNH is dedicated to helping students to be successful, 
probationary students are required to work with 
assigned academic skills counselors. 

Students on probation are limited to four courses 
(13 credits) during the term of their probationary sta- 
tus. They may also be required to retake courses in 
which they performed poorly. The university may void 
a registration for more than four courses. Also, any 
courses above the four course limit taken at another 
institution during a period of probation will not be 
accepted in transfer to UNH. 

Academic probation of transfer students is deter- 
mined in accordance with the same graduated, mini- 
mum cumulative quality point ratio scale as for non- 
transfer students detailed above. In determining a 
transfer student's academic standing, the student's 
total semester hours completed— those transferred from 
other colleges plus those received at the University of 
New Haven— are applied to the minimum cumulative 
quality point ratio scale. 

Repetition of Work 

A course which a student has completed may be 
repeated only with the consent of the chair of the 
department which offers the course. If a student 



Academic Regulations 45 



achieves a higher grade in the second attempt, that 
grade rather than the first will be used to compute the 
cumulative quality point ratio. However, both the 
higher and lower grades in the course remain in the 
student's permanent record. 

When credit for a graded course previously 
attempted at UNH is earned through a method which 
does not carry a grade with a quality point value, the 
previous instance of that course will be removed from 
the cumulative QPR calculation. However, both 
instances will be recorded on the student's permanent 
record and transcript. 

Dismissal/Readmission Procedure 

Students are dismissed from the university at the 
end of each semester or trimester on the basis of the 
criteria listed in "Probation and Dismissal." Notifi- 
cation is made by the Registrar via certified letter. This 
letter will specify the time span for appeal (normally 
five days) and the criteria for appeal. 

Upon request by the student, an appeal will be heard 
by the Academic Standing and Admissions Committee. 
If the appeal has merit and is granted, the student will be 
so notified by the chair of the Academic Standing and 
Admissions Committee. The committee may require 
special arrangements or conditions to allow the student 
to continue. Satisfaction of such conditions would be a 
priority obligation for the student. 

If there is no appeal or if an appeal is denied, the stu- 
dent will be removed from any courses for which the stu- 
dent is registered that have not yet begun. The student 
may continue in any intersession or summer course 
which began before the date of dismissal, but may not 
start any courses after dismissal is effective. Dismissal 
action will be noted on the student's academic transcript. 

A third probation will result in dismissal from the 
university. The student will be allowed to complete any 
incomplete courses (subject to established rules and 
restrictions) and grades/credits earned will be trans- 
ferrable to other institutions. However, the dismissal 
will remain irrevocable, not subject to appeal. 

Readmission 

Application for readmission of students who have 



been dismissed and who either did not appeal or 
whose appeal was denied normally will be considered 
only after the lapse of a semester and only when stu- 
dents provide evidence which indicates probable suc- 
cess if readmitted. 

Unusual circumstances may permit earlier applica- 
tion if a student's dean and department chair success- 
fully petition the Academic Standing and Admissions 
Committee to review the applicant's case. 

Requests for readmission should be submitted in 
writing to the chair of the Academic Standing and 
Admissions Committee at least three weeks before the 
opening of the semester, and should include evidence 
supporting the student's belief that he or she will suc- 
ceed if readmitted. 

A student who has been absent from the university for 
one or more semesters must submit a new application 
and pay another application fee. If the student has attend- 
ed another college or university, an official academic tran- 
script is required from that institution. Following the 
receipt of the above material, action will be taken on the 
application for readmission. Since the student is not 
matriculated at UNH during this period, no coordinated 
courses will be accepted. Upon successflil readmission, 
students will register for classes for the first term of their 
return through the Undergraduate Admissions Office. 

Readmission is not automatic. The Academic 
Standing and Admissions Committee reviews each 
application and makes a decision on acceptance, rejec- 
tion or conditional acceptance of students. 

A student who is academically dismissed and read- 
mitted by the Academic Standing and Admissions 
Committee may be prohibited from continuing with 
the academic program in which he or she was enrolled 
at the time of the dismissal. If the Committee readmits 
the student to a new program, the student shall have 
the same automatic right to enrollment in that pro- 
gram as any other newly admitted student. 



Changes 

Dropping/ Adding a Class 

Students who wish to make a change in class sched- 



46 



ule must complete a Drop Card or an Add Card or 
both. These are available from the Registrar's Office. 
All adds and drops require the signature of the instruc- 
tor and the student's adviser. In the case of part-time 
evening students, drops require the signature of the 
instructor only, although it is recommended that stu- 
dents consult with their advisers. 

The last date to add classes is two weeks into the 
semester, and is listed in the academic calendar. No 
classes may be added after this date. All changes 
should be completed prior to the second week of 
class so that students may be properly registered in 
the correct sections. 

Withdrawal from a Class 

Students desiring to withdraw formally from a class 
may do so before the last day to drop courses pub- 
lished in the academic calendar. Formal withdrawal 
removes the student's name from the class roll and 
removes the course listing from the student's record 
and transcript. The student must obtain a Drop Card 
from the Registrar's Office, complete it, sign it and 
obtain the signature of the instructor and adviser. The 
card is then returned to the Registrar's Office. 

Students withdrawing from a class after the last day 
to drop courses will receive a grade for the course as 
assigned by the faculty. The course and grade will 
appear on the student's grade report and transcript. 

Filing a Drop Card does not qualify the student for 
cancellation of any university tuition or fee. Tuition 
refunds are subject to the refund policy outlined else- 
where in this catalog. 

Changing a Major 

Students wishing to make a change in major or pro- 
gram must meet with the chair of the department into 
which they wish to transfer. In consultation with the 
student, the chair will prepare a change of major form 
and forward it to the Registrar's Office. 

Leave of Absence 

Matriculated students may interrupt continuous 
enrollment by electing to take a leave of absence from 
the university. The purposes may be for medical or 



personal reasons, to pursue a program of study at 
another institution or to engage in other off-campus 
educational experiences without severing their connec- 
tion with the University of New Haven through with- 
drawal. Before taking a leave of absence, students are 
encouraged to discuss their particular situation with an 
academic adviser, the dean of their school, or a coun- 
selor in the Counseling Center. 

The rules regarding leaves of absence are: 

• All noninternational students must file for a leave 
of absence through the Registrar's Office; interna- 
tional students must initiate the leave of absence 
through the International Services Office. 

• Students who are on university disciplinary proba- 
tion are not eligible for a leave of absence. 

• A student who has been dropped or dismissed from 
the university for disciplinary or academic reasons 
is not eligible for a leave of absence until properly 
reinstated. 

• A student who has withdrawn as a degree candidate 
is not eligible for a leave of absence. If a student 
withdraws while on leave of absence, the leave is 
invalidated. 

• Leaves are not required or granted for summer 
periods alone. 

• Normally, leaves are not approved for a period 
longer than two semesters. Under special circum- 
stances, a leave of absence may be approved for a 
maximum of four semesters or two years. 

• If a student wishes to return later than the semester 
originally stated on the leave of absence form, the 
person must apply for an extension of the leave of 
absence through the Registrar's Office, not to 
exceed the maximum period as outlined above. 

• A student who plans to enroll for coursework at 
another accredited institution during a leave of 
absence should review program plans with his or her 
academic department adviser to verify eligibility for 
receiving credit at the University of New Haven. 

• Taking a leave of absence may affect a student's 
financial aid. All students receiving financial aid are 
encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office 
before taking a leave of absence. 

• A student who fulfills the conditions of an 
approved leave of absence may return to the uni- 
versity and register for classes without applying for 



Academic Regulations 47 



readmission; the students may preregister for the 
semester in which they plan to return. 

• If the student does not apply for an extension or 
exceeds the maximum period and wishes to return to 
the university, the student must be formally readmit- 
ted by the Undergraduate Admissions Office. 

• All applications for leaves of absence after the 
twelfth week of classes must be approved by the 
Registrar before they are considered final. 

• For leaves of absence completed during the first 12 
weeks of the semester, the student's transcript will 
contain no record of courses attempted or grades 
received during that semester. 

• Leaves of absence completed and approved after 
the twelfth week of the semester could result in 
the receipt of the grades for all courses in which 
the student is registered at the time of taking the 
leave of absence. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students desiring to withdraw from the university 
must complete the necessary form at the Registrar's 
Office and notify each of their instructors. It is the stu- 
dent's obligation to complete this formal procedure. 
Failure to do so leaves the student liable for all of the 
current semester's tuition and fees, and may result in 
grades of F being assigned in the student's courses. 

Formal withdrawal must be completed during the 
first four weeks of the semester in order to obtain any 
cancellation of tuition and fees (as described in this 
catalog) unless there are clearly extenuating circum- 
stances and a formal appeal is made through the 
Registrar's Office. 

Formal withdrawal which is completed at any time 
during the first 12 weeks of the semester will assure that 
the student's transcript will contain no record of courses 
attempted or grades received during that semester. 

Formal withdrawal which is completed after the 
twelfth week of the semester could result in the 
receipt of the grades for all courses in which the stu- 
dent is registered at the time of withdrawal. Students 
should note that formal withdrawal after the twelfth 
week cannot be regarded as complete unless, in addi- 
tion to the above requirements, it has been approved 
by the Registrar. 



Because of the serious ramifications of formal with- 
drawal from the university, students contemplating 
this action should discuss the matter with their advis- 
er or a counselor as soon as problems are perceived. 

Transfer of Credit from the University 

Credits may be transferred from the University of 
New Haven, a fully accredited university, to any other 
college or university merely by obtaining a letter of 
authorization from the school to which the transfer of 
credit is desired. 



General Policies 

Academic Honesty 

Academic dishonesty is not tolerated at the 
University of New Haven. All students are responsible 
for reading and understanding the statement on aca- 
demic honesty in the Student Handbook. 

Violation of university standards for academic 
honesty, including plagiarism, will be a sufficient 
reason for an F in the course and will be reported to 
the Vice President for Student Affairs and Athletics. 
A second violation may be cause for expulsion from 
the university. 

Plagiarism is defined as the unacknowledged use of 
another person's work or the submission of the same 
work for more than one course without express writ- 
ten permission in advance. 

Attendance Regulations 

Every student is expected to attend all regularly 
scheduled class sessions. Specific course attendance 
guidelines are established by the academic depart- 
ments or each individual faculty member. 

From time to time, it may become necessary for the 
university to compile attendance records for every 
course in order to meet the needs of regulatory agen- 
cies, accrediting bodies or for other purposes. 

A maximum of two weeks of absences will be per- 
mitted for illness and emergencies. The instructor has 
the right to dismiss from the course any student who 



48 



has been absent more than the maximum classes 
allowed. Please refer to the Student Handbook for fur- 
ther clarification of attendance requirements. 

If a student attends classes regularly but is not prop- 
erly registered with the university (see Registration sec- 
tion elsewhere in this catalog), the instructor has the 
right to dismiss the student from the course. 

Coursework Expectations 

All full-time and part-time students are expected to 
spend at least two hours of time on academic studies 
outside of and in addition to each hour of class time. 
This expectation should be used by the student as a 
guide in determining how much time to spend on aca- 
demic studies outside of class. It should be used by the 
student, in consultation with the academic adviser, to 
help determine the student's course load each semester, 
so that the course load matches the amount of time 
available for academic studies. 

Make-up Policy 

Make-up examinations are a privilege extended to 
students at the discretion of the instructor, who may 
grant make-up examinations to those students who 
miss an examination as the result of a medical problem 
or a personal emergency. On the other hand, the 
instructor may simply choose to adopt a "no make-up" 
policy. If an instructor does choose to offer a make-up 
test, there are two options: 1) use university proctors, if 
available, in which case the student must pay a make- 
up exam fee for regular semester examinations and for 
final examinations; 2) make private arrangements to 
offer the examination, in which case the make-up exam 
fee is charged at the instructor's discretion. 

Graduation 



Graduation Criteria 

Matriculated students are required to submit a peti- 
tion for graduation in the term immediately preceding 
their anticipated commencement. Graduation peti- 
tions must be signed by the chair of the student's aca- 
demic department prior to submission of the petition 



and graduation fee at the Bursar's Office in Maxcy 
Hall. Petition forms, graduation fees and due dates are 
published by the Registrar each term. 

Graduation is not automatic. Petitions, once filed, 
ensure that a student's record will be formally assessed 
in terms of degree requirements, and that it will be 
submitted to the faculty for final approval. A petition 
may be denied if graduation requirements are not met. 
If a petition is approved, a degree will be awarded for 
the appropriate commencement. Only those students 
who have successfiilly completed the graduation re- 
quirements listed below can participate in the com- 
mencement ceremonies. 

A degree will be conferred by the Board of Governors 
when a student has satisfied all program requirements 
and has met the following university requirements: 

1 . successfully petitioned and paid all graduation fees; 

2. earned a cumulative quality point ratio of no less 
than 2.0 in all courses applicable toward the degree; 

3. earned a cumulative quality point ratio of no less 
than 2.0 (or higher if required by individual 
department) in all courses in the student's major 
field of study; 

4. passed the university's Writing Proficiency 
Examination; 

5. been recommended by the faculty; 

6. met all financial and other obligations and 
conformed to any local, state or federal law 
concerning graduation; 

7. met the residency requirement of the university. 

If a student does not meet all the requirements as 
outlined above prior to the commencement date, the 
diploma for the specific commencement date will be 
destroyed. It is the student's responsibility to refile and 
make payment for a new petition for a future com- 
mencement date. 

Residency Requirement 

The residency requirement of the university is 30 
credit hours taken at West Haven or at one of the uni- 
versity's off-campus centers. This requirement applies 
to all degrees, undergraduate and graduate. Transfer 
credit, coordinated courses, credit by examination, 
CLEP, DANTES or proficiency examinations do not 
fulfill residency requirements. 



Academic Regulations 49 



To ensure depth of study, the residency require- 
ment must include 12 credit hours of work in the 
declared major for an associate's degree, and 18 credit 
hours for a bachelor's degree. Exceptions may be grant- 
ed only by the dean administrating the major. 

Writing Proficiency Examination 

Because the University of New Haven believes that 
good writing skills are essential for success, it requires 
all its undergraduate students to demonstrate such 
skills before it will confer a bachelor's degree. 

All students must pass the university's Writing 
Proficiency Examination as a requirement for gradua- 
tion. No student will be eligible to receive the B.A. or 
B.S. degree unless this examination is passed. All stu- 
dents must take this examination during the first 
semester after the completion of 57 credit hours. 
Failure to take the examination may preclude contin- 
uous registration. 

The examination will consist of the writing of an 
impromptu theme on one of several topics of current 
interest. If the student's syntax, punctuation and dic- 
tion are in accord with the conventions of standard 
English and if the argument or exposition is clear and 
coherent, the student will pass. If the student's writing 
is found to be deficient in these respects, notice of the 
unsatisfactory performance on the examination will be 
sent to the student and to the student's academic 
adviser. 

Students who fail the examination must take it 
again each subsequent semester in which they are 
enrolled until the examination is passed. Those who 
fail are encouraged to utilize the services of the Center 
for Learning Resources or retake E 105 Composition 
to help them to improve their writing proficiency. 
Passing E 105 and/or utilizing the Center for Learning 
Resources does not satisfy the university writing profi- 
ciency requirement. In no case shall the requirements 
for a four-year degree be completed unless the Writing 
Proficiency Examination has been passed. 

Honors 

Academic honors are posted on the student's final 
transcript along with the name of the degree earned 



and the date the degree was conferred. 

Honors are conferred upon candidates for gradua- 
tion according to the following standards: 

1. An associate's degree With Honors is awarded to 
students who have a quality point ratio of 3.25 for 
the credit hours specifically required for the degree 
program from which they are being graduated and 
who have taken 30 or more hours of required work 
at this university. 

2. An associate's degree With High Honors is award- 
ed to students who have a quality point ratio of 
3.50 for the credit hours specifically required for 
the degree program from which they are being 
graduated and who have taken 30 or more hours of 
required work at this university. 

3. The bachelor's degree Cum Laude is awarded to 
students graduating with a cumulative quality 
point ratio of at least 3.50, who have taken 60 or 
more credit hours of required work at UNH and 
who have completed all the suggested courses with- 
in their curriculum. 

4. The bachelor's degree Magna Cum Laude is award- 
ed to students graduating with a cumulative quali- 
ty point ratio of at least 3.70, whose qualit)' point 
ratio in all courses counting toward their major is at 
least 3.70, who have taken 60 or more credit hours 
of required work at UNH, and who have complet- 
ed all the suggested courses within their curricu- 
lum. 

5. The bachelor's degree Summa Cum Laude is 
awarded to students graduating with a cumulative 
quality point ratio of at least 3.90, whose quality 
point ratio in all courses counting toward their 
major is at least 3.90, who have taken 60 or more 
credit hours of required work at UNH, and who 
have completed all the suggested courses within 
their curriculum. 

In determining eligibility for degrees with honors, 
transfer credit and credits earned by crediting exami- 
nation will not be considered. Only the cumulative 
quality point ratio for courses completed at the 
University of New Haven is considered in determining 
a student's eligibility for honors. 



50 



TUITION, FEES 
AND EXPENSES 



The tuition and other expenses Hsted in this section 
reflect the charges for the 2002—03 academic year. 

Full-time students taking courses offered during 
both the day and /or the evening will pay the full-time 
tuition rate for the first 17 credits per semester. 

Any student who is registered as a full-time day divi- 
sion student on the first day of the semester will be 
responsible for payment of fijll-time day division tuition 
for the entire semester, regardless of any subsequent drop- 
ping of credits or withdrawal from a course. Full-time day 
division students who plan to enroll for less than 1 2 cred- 
its in any given term must change their enrollment status 
to part-time prior to the first day of the term. 

Students enrolled as full-time day division students 
who take 18 or more credit hours in a single term will 
be charged additional tuition for each credit hour over 
17, unless the additional credits are required for that 
semester on the student's major worksheet. 

International Student Fee 

The international student fee is required of all 
international undergraduate and graduate students 
when they first enroll. It supports a variety of services 
and programs, cross-cultural workshops, community 
activities, international alumni programs, library sub- 
scriptions to international newspapers and magazines, 
and the International Services OfFice. 

Engineering Tuition Differential 

Courses with the designations CE, CEN, CH, 
CM, CS, EE, ES, IE, ME offered by the School of 
Engineering and Applied Science are charged an addi- 
tional $75 per credit hour tuition differential. 

Student Activity Fee 

The student activity fee is distributed to various 



student groups by the Undergraduate Student 
Government Association. It covers the cost of stu- 
dent-supported services such as the newspaper and 
radio station and helps defray the expenses of clubs, 
organizations, social activities, etc. 

Undergraduate Full-Time Day 
Division 2002-03 



Application Fee 

Payable with student's application to 
the university. 



$25 



$200 



Enrollment Deposit 

Payable by all new and transfer domestic 
students. Fee will be credited toward tuition, 
but is not refundable after May 1st for 
students entering in the Fall, and January 1st 
for students entering in the Spring semester. 

Acceptance Fee $225 

Payable by all new international students 
upon notification of acceptance; not 
refundable. 



International Student Fee 



.$200 



Orientation Fee/New Full-Time Students . . . $75 

Tuition, 2002-03, Full-Time Students 

Per Per 

Semester Year 

New full-time students 

taking 12-17 credit hours $9,400 $18,800 

Returning full-time students 

taking 12-17 credit hours $8,740 $17,480 

Engineering Tuition Differential $75 per credit hour. 



Tuition, Fees, & Expenses 51 



New Full- Time Division students taking fewer than 
12 credit hours, the tuition is $625 per credit hour. 

New Full-Time Division students taking 18 or more 
credit hours, additional tuition for each credit hour over 
17 is $625. 

Returning Full- Time Division students taking fewer than 
12 credit hours, the tuition is $580 per credit hour. 

Returning Full-Time Division students taking 18 or 
more credit hours, additional tuition for each credit 
hour over l/is $580. 

Per Per 

Semester Year 

Student Activity Fee $141 $282 

Health Service Fees 

Domestic Students $150 $150 

(prorated in Spring) 

International Students $599 $599 

(prorated in Spring) 



Technology Fee 



$25 



$50 



Total Tuition and Fees 



Per 

Semester 
$13,698 



Per 
Year 



New Domestic students $13,698 $27,397 

Renirning domestic students $13,001 $26,002 

Registration Late Fee $25 

Late Payment Fees 

Assessed for failure to complete 

payment of tuition, meal plan or 

residence charge by due dates listed 

in the academic calendar. $50 

Additional fee of 1-1/2 percent per month on 
the unpaid balance after the first day of classes. 

Part-Time Evening Undergraduate 
Division 2002-03 

Application Fee 

Payable with the student's application 

to the university, not refundable $25 



Tuition, 2002-03 

Part-Time Evening Division students 

taking up to 11 credit hours, 

per credit hour $345 

Engineering Tuition Differential, 

per credit hour $75 

Technology Fee 

per semester $25 

per undergraduate module $10 

Registration Late Fee $15 

Student Activity Fee, per term $10 

Tuition Late Payment Fee 

Fifty percent of the tuition for a 
Part-time Division student must be 

paid by the due date $25 

The other 50 percent is due by the 
first week of class. After this, the 
student must pay 1-1/2 percent per 
month on the unpaid balance. 

Tuition for Summer Session and Winter Intersession 

All students pay per credit hour for summer 
session and winter intersession courses. . .$345 

Tuition, UN H-South eastern 

Students at UNH Southeastern are 

Part-Time Division students and 

pay by the credit, per credit hour $345 

Technology Fee, per trimester $15 

Student Activity Fee, per term $ 1 

Room Fees, 2002-03 

Per Per 

Semester Year 

. Undergraduate $2,400 $4,800 

Activity Fee $ 40 $80 

Intersession/Summer 

Session (per week) $137.50 

Resident Student Enrollment 

Commitment Deposit $400* 

* Nonrefiindable if student does not attend; 

applied to first semester fees if enrolled. 
Damage Deposit $150 



52 



Board Fees, 2002-03 

Meal Plans 

Plan A (14 meals/week 
plus declining balance) 

Plan B (10 meals/week 
plus declining balance) 

Plan C (5 meals/week 
plus declining balance) 



Per Semester 

$1,580 
$1,525 
$ 1,310 



Note: Meal Plan A or B is mandatory for all 
resident freshman and sophomore students; 
Meal Plan A, B or C is mandatory for all 
resident junior and senior students. 

Other Fees 

Laboratory Fees 

Payable each semester by students 
registering for courses requiring the 
laboratory fee as listed in the catalog. 
Nonrefundable fees are announced in 
printed course schedules in advance of 
each semester. (See also the engineering 
tuition differential described previously.) 

Make-up Test 

Assessed when a student is permitted 
to make up an announced test 



$10 



Make-up Examination 

Assessed when a student is permitted 
to take an end-of-semester examination 
at a time other than the scheduled time, 
except for conflicts caused by the 
examination schedule $15 

Co-op Program 

Students participating in the university's 
cooperative education program pay a 
continuing registration fee for semesters 
during which they work. 

Full time Co-op fee $ 1 00 

Part-time Co-op fee $75 



Crediting Exam 

Assessed when a student is permitted 
to take a crediting examination for a 
3-credit course 



.$300 



Auditing a Course 

Students pay the same mition and fees 
for auditing a course as they pay when 
the course is taken for credit. 

Graduation 

Assessed regardless of participation 
in exercises; no reduction will be 
made for nonattendance. The assessed 
fee includes a lifetime membership in 
the UNH Alumni Association. For 
graduation in May/June, the fee and 
graduation petition are due no later 
than March 1 of the year of graduation; 
for awarding of degrees in August the 
fee and graduation petition are due by 
June 15; for January commencement, 
the fee and graduation petition are 
due before October 15 of the prior 
calendar year. Failure to meet the 
deadline date will result in a late 
charge of $50 in addition to the 
normal graduation fee, to be paid if 
there is sufficient time to process the 
graduation petition. If processing is 
not possible, graduation will be post- 
poned to the next award date $110 

Graduation Refiling/Diploma Replacement Fee 

This fee is paid to the university 

to refde for graduation if the student 

petitioned and failed to complete the 

requirements prior to the expected 

graduation date or the fee is paid to 

the university to replace a lost or 

damaged diploma $50 



Transcript of Academic Work 

One free copy provided at graduation; 
all others, per copy 



$5 



Tuition, Fees, & Expenses 53 



Payments 

Tuition, fees and other charges are payable when due. 
Checks or money orders should be made payable to the 
University of New Haven. There is a penalty charge of 
$20 per check for all checks returned by the payer's bank. 

The university withholds all issuance of grades, 
the awarding of diplomas, the issuance of transcripts, 
and the granting of honorable dismissal to any stu- 
dent whose account is in arrears. 

The university offers deferred payment choices to 
help with education expenses. In partnership with 
Tuition Management Systems (TMS), the nations top 
rated education payment plan provider, services provid- 
ed include an interest-free monthly payment option that 
allows education expenses to be spread over 10 monthly 
payments per year for an enrollment fee of $55. 

The enrollment fee includes toll-free and Internet 
access to education payment counselors and account 
information. In addition, low-interest loan counseling 
and information is available for those students and 
families who need loan assistance or for persons who 
find the monthly payment amounts to be too large. 

Information and enrollment forms for TMS are 
available from the Financial Aid Office or by calling 
1-800-722-4867, or at www.ajford.com. 

Application for this plan must be made prior to the 
first day of each semester. 

Tuition Refund Policy 

After a formal withdrawal request is initiated by 
undergraduate students, tuition is refunded or can- 
celed according to the following scale: 

Date of Receipt of Percentage 

Withdrawal Request Canceled 

1st week of semester 80% 

2nd week of semester 60% 

3rd week of semester 40% 

4th week of semester 20% 

After the 4th week 0% 

A prorated refund, rather than a refund based on 
the above-mentioned scale, may be made in situations 
involving clearly extenuating circumstances such as 
protracted illness of a student. All appeals for a prorat- 



ed refund based on extenuating circumstances must be 
made in writing and include documentation of the 
extenuating circumstances. Appeals are to be sent to 
the Directors of Counseling and Health Services; pro- 
rated refunds will be determined by the Committee on 
Withdrawals. All requests for refunds should be initi- 
ated before the close of the semester of withdrawal. 
Any student under the age of 1 8 must have the writ- 
ten consent of a parent or guardian indicating to 
whom any refund, if applicable, is to be paid in order 
to withdraw from the university. 

Summer Sessions and Intersession 

In cases of withdrawal from a course or courses 
within the first week of each term, a refund of 50 per- 
cent of tuition is made. There is no refund of summer 
or intersession tuition after the first week. 

The foregoing policy is intended to protect the uni- 
versity, since the university plans its expenses and bases its 
budget on full collection of tuition and fees from all reg- 
istered students, and assumes the obligation of supplying 
instruction and other services throughout the year. 

Residence Hall Fee and Withdrawal Policies 

1. A $400 non-refundable enrollment deposit is 
required of new students requesting on-campus 
housing. $200 of this fee is applied to the fall semes- 
ter housing fees. A $200 non-refundable room selec- 
tion fee, which is applied to the fall semester housing 
fees, is required of returning students. 

2. Housing and meal plan fees are billed on a semes- 
ter basis in June and December. 

3. Each student is required to have a $150 damage 
deposit on account, which is billed with the student's 
initial university invoice containing charges for hous- 
ing. Students are then responsible for maintaining 
their damage deposits at the $150 level while a resi- 
dent student. 

4. An activity fee of $40 is billed each semester. 

5. All resident students are required to purchase a 
University Meal Plan. 

6. The housing agreement is binding for the 2002- 
03 academic year. 

a. Students who cancel their housing agreement for 



54 



the 2003 spring semester and remain enrolled as 
a full-time student for the spring semester will be 
billed for the spring semester housing fees. 

b. Students who are leaving the University must 
withdraw from housing by January 6, 2003. 
Failure to meet the withdrawal deadline of 
January 6, 2003 will result in a charge of $100, 
which will be deducted, from the student's 
damage deposit. 

Proper withdrawal includes: 

• Notifying the Office of Residential Life 
in writing that the student is leaving 
university housing, 

• Checking out with a Resident Director, and 

• Returning all keys to the Office of 
Residential Life. 

7. Housing fees are non-refundable after August 24, 
2002 and January 21, 2003. 



The university reserves the right to make, at any 
time, whatever changes may be deemed necessary 
in admission requirements, fees, charges, tuition, 
faculty, instructors, policies, regulations and aca- 
demic programs it deems necessary prior to the 
start of any class, term, semester, trimester or ses- 
sion. The university reserves the right to divide, 
cancel or reschedule classes or programs if enroll- 
ment or other factors so require. All such changes 
are effective at such times as the proper authorities 
determine and may apply not only to prospective 
students but also to those who are already enrolled 
in the university. 



Financial Aid 55 



FINANCIAL AID 



Karen M. Flynn, B.A., M.A., Interim Director 
Christopher Maclean, B.A., Assistant Director 

The University of New Haven offers a comprehen- 
sive financial aid program, with students receiving 
assistance in the form of grants, scholarships, student 
loans and part-time employment. Funds are available 
from federal and state governments, private sponsors 
and from university resources. More than 70 percent 
of the university's full-time undergraduate students 
receive some form of financial assistance. 

Most financial aid awards are based on an individ- 
ual applicant's demonstration of need. Some funds are 
available on a merit-basis for students who have excep- 
tional academic records or athletic ability. Need-based 
awards are available only to U.S. citizens or eligible 
non-citizens. 

Financial aid award decisions are made afi:er a careful 
consideration of a student's application for assistance. 
The Financial Aid Office attempts to consider all aspects 
of a student's financial circumstances in calculating need 
and attempts to meet the need of aid applicants through 
a "package" of assistance, generally including a combina- 
tion of grants, loans and employment. 

Students interested in applying for financial aid are 
encouraged to do so as early as possible. New students 
must apply by March 15 for the fall semester and 
December 1st for the spring semester. Returning, 
upper-class students must submit application materi- 
als no later than March 1st. All students are encour- 
aged to apply for aid as early as possible to ensure full 
consideration for available funds. 

Applications completed after the deadline date will 
be considered on a rolling basis based upon the avail- 
ability of funds. 

The following application materials must be com- 
pleted and submitted by each financial aid applicant: 

• University of New Haven Financial Aid Appli- 
cation. The application form must be completed 
fiiUy and submitted to the Financial Aid Office. 



• Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The 
FAFSA is required to apply for financial aid from 
federal as well as state and institutional student 
financial aid programs. Students should list the 
University of New Haven on the form as one of the 
colleges authorized to receive this information. 
The UNH Title IV School Code is 001397. 
Approximately 4 weeks after the FAFSA is submit- 
ted to the Federal Student Aid Program you will 
receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) directly from 
the U.S. Department of Education. Applications 
are available from any Financial Aid Office or High 
School Guidance Office. Students may also apply 
online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. 

• Tax Documentation. Applicants must submit 
signed copies of both the student's and parent's 
complete federal income tax returns from the most 
recent tax year prior to the academic year. Tax 
forms must include all pertinent schedules. 
Students filing as independents are not required to 
submit their parent's tax documentation. 

Other forms and documents may be requested 
from applicants as their aid applications are reviewed. 
Upon completion of the review of an application, the 
Financial Aid Office will notify an applicant of his or 
her eligibility for financial aid. 

Financial Aid Refund Policy 

When students are entitled to a refund as a result of 
withdrawal from courses, refunds of charges and 
financial aid will be based on the institutional refund 
policy as described elsewhere in the catalog. 

Academic Requirements for the 
Retention of Financial Aid Eligibility 

All students receiving financial aid must be making 
satisfactory academic progress and be in good academ- 
ic standing in order to be eligible to receive financial 
aid. 



56 



Students receiving financial aid as full-time under- 
graduates must successfully complete a minimum of 
24 credits during the academic year in order to main- 
tain satisfactory progress; full-time students who 
attend for only one semester during the academic year 
must complete a minimum of 12 credits. Satisfactory 
academic progress for part-time students is defined as 
successful completion of all the credits for which 
financial aid was awarded. 

"Successful completion" is defined as the receipt of 
a passing letter grade (A+ to D-), and does not include 
the receipt of an F (Failure), I (Incomplete), DNA 
(Did Not Attend), or W (Withdrawal). The require- 
ments for good academic standing are described in the 
"Academic Regulations" section of the catalog. 

Major Aid Programs 

Grants 

Federal Pell Grants - The Pell Grant Program is a fed- 
eral program providing grant assistance to low income 
students. Grants for the 2002-03 academic year range 
from $200-$4,000 with the student's eligibility being 
determined by the U.S. Department of Education. 

SEOG-Federal Supplemental Educational Opportu- 
nity Grant - SEOG is a federal program to provide 
grant assistance to exceptionally needy students. 
Students are selected by the university to receive 
SEOG Grants. 

Connecticut Independent College Student Grant 
Program - Funds provided by the Connecticut 
General Assembly are awarded to needy Connecticut 
residents attending the university. 

Capitol Scholarship Program - Connecticut students 
who have finished in the top 20 percent of their high 
school class or who have scored 1200 or greater on 
their combined Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores 
may be eligible for the Connecticut Scholastic 
Achievement Grant. Students must obtain an applica- 
tion from their high school guidance office. 

University Grants-in-Aid - University grants are 
made in all divisions on the basis of need. 



Presidential Scholarship - Incoming full-time fresh- 
man students who have a combined SAT score of 1200 
or above and rank in the top 15% of their graduating 
class automatically qualify for a half-tuition scholarship. 
Awards will be renewed for up to 3 additional years as 
long as the student maintains a B+ (3.3) cumulative 
average, remains a fiall-time student and makes satisfac- 
tory academic progress. The deadline is June 1 . 

Academic Leadership Scholarships - Incoming full- 
time freshmen with good academic records may qual- 
ify for an academic scholarship 

Awards will be renewed for up to three additional 
years as long as the student maintains a B (3.0) cumu- 
lative average, makes satisfactory academic progress 
and remains a full-time student. 

Presidential Scholarship for Transfer Students - 

Incoming transfer students who have a minimum of 30 
credits transferable to UNH or who hold an associate's 
degree may qualify for an academic scholarship based on 
the following scale: 



Overall GPA 

3.30 - 3.49 
3.50 - 3.69 
3.70 - 4.0 



Award 

$4,500/year 
$5,500/year 
$7,000/year 



Students may receive the award for a maximum of 
seven semesters as long as the student maintains a B+ 
cumulative average and remains a full-time student. 
The deadline is June 1. 

Athletic Grants-in-Aid - Athletic grants are provided 
to students for participation in sports. Selection for the 
awards is made by the athletic department based on 
students' athletic ability. Awards can range up to a full 
tuition, room and board scholarship. Athletic grants 
are available in the following sports: 



Men 

Baseball 

Basketball 

Cross-Country 

Football 

Golf 

Indoor Track 



Women 

Basketball 
Cross Country 
Golf 

Indoor Track 
Lacrosse 
Soccer 



Financial Aid 57 



Men 

Soccer 

Track and Field 

Volleyball 



Women 

Softball 

Tennis 

Track and Field 

Volleyball 



Miscellaneous State Scholarships - Students ftom 
selected states may be eligible to apply for state scholar- 
ships which can be brought to Connecticut for atten- 
dance at the University of New Haven. Students should 
contact their state scholarship agencies for information. 

Donor Scholarships — Many scholarship awards are 
available each year through the generosity of business 
firms, charitable organizations and friends of the uni- 
versity. Scholarship funds are awarded from annual 
gifts from sponsors and from income from the univer- 
sity's endowments. 

Loans 

Federal Perkins Loan Program (formerly National 
Direct Student Loan Program) — The Perkins Loan 
Program is a federal loan program. Repayment on 
Perkins Loans begins six months after a recipient leaves 
school and carries a 5 percent rate of interest com- 
mencing with the repayment. Students are selected by 
the university to receive Perkins Loans. 

Federal Stafford Student Loan (SSL) - The Stafford 
Student Loan is a federally subsidized loan program avail- 
able to students enrolled at least half-time on the basis of 
financial need. The annual loan limits are as follows: 

1 St year undergraduate $2,625 

2nd year undergraduate $3,500 

3rd year through completion $5,500 

Graduate Students $8,500 

The interest rate is variable and is subsidized by the 
federal government while the student is enrolled on at 
least a half-time basis. Repayment begins six months 
after graduation or withdrawal from college. Entrance 
and exit interviews must be conducted with all borrow- 
ers in person. The entrance interview must be conduct- 
ed prior to the student receiving the first student loan 
check. Exit interviews must be conducted prior to a stu- 
dent's graduation or withdrawal. Students must submit a 
complete financial aid application. 



Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Student Loan - The 

Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is similar to the Stafford 
Loan listed above except that it is not based on finan- 
cial need and there is no in-school interest subsidy. 
Combined Subsidized and Unsubsidized loans cannot 
exceed the stated annual loan limits. 

Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students 
(PLUS) - The PLUS Loan Program is a federal pro- 
gram in which parents of dependent students are per- 
mitted to apply for up to the cost of attendance minus 
any financial aid. The interest rate is variable. 
Application forms and information on this program 
are available from the Financial Aid Office. 

FELP-Family Education Loan Program - FELP is a 
low interest loan program administered by the 
Connecticut Higher Education Suppleniental Loan 
Authority (CHESLA). Applicants may borrow from 
$2,000-$20,000 per academic year at a fixed annual 
rate. Repayment can be up to 140 months with the 
option of paying only interest while the student is 
enrolled in school. Applicants must be credit worthy. 
For an application and further information call 1-800- 
252-FELP (in Connecticut) or (860) 522-0766. 

Student Employment 

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)-The Federal 
Work-Study Program is a federal financial aid program 
which provides employment opportunities for needy 
students. 

Alternative Financing Options 

University Seniors Program-This program offers sen- 
iors age 55 or older an opportunity to take an under- 
graduate course at a reduced rate. 

Tuition Management Services (TMS)-The TMS 
Plan offers a monthly system to pay for educational 
expenses through regularly scheduled payments over a 
10-month contract. This plan carries an enrollment 
fee, but there are no interest or finance charges. 
Applications are available at the Financial Aid Office 
and the Bursar's Office. For further information, con- 
tact Tuition Management Services at 1-800-722-4867, 
at wwiv.ajford.com. 



58 



The following scholarships are awarded at the discretion 
of the university and require no special application 
form— unless otherwise noted. 

Alumni Association Scholarships - Merit-based full- 
time day students with exemplary academic records. 

Amity Charitable Trust Fund - An annual award is 
made from the income of this fund to a worthy, needy 
student. Preference is given to students from the 
greater New Haven area. The fund was made possible 
through the generosity of the Amity Club. 

Anthem/Blue Cross & Blue Shield-Joseph F. 
Duplinsky Scholarship - This award was established 
by Anthem/Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Connecticut 
to honor its past chairman, a UNH alumnus. Students 
must be business administration majors and 
Connecticut residents. Selection is based on need and 
academic merit. 

Arthur Andersen & Company Scholarship - This is 
an endowed scholarship for accounting majors who 
demonstrate both financial need and scholastic ability. 

The Barn Sale Scholarship - A scholarship is available 
each year for a deserving, upper-class disabled student. 
The award is made possible by an endowment estab- 
lished by the Barn Sale, Inc. 

Bayer Scholarships - Established by the Bayer 
Corporation to provide academic scholarships and 
paid internships to students in the science and tech- 
nology fields. Two-year scholarships are awarded to 
four freshmen who are in the top 1 5% of their high 
school class and who earned 1200 or better on the 
SAT. Students must major in engineering, computer 
science, biology or forensic science. Students may be 
eligible to apply for the Bayer internship program for 
the junior/senior years. 

Bayer Preprofessional Internships — All outstanding 
sophomore students in science and technology with a 
3.3 cumulative grade point average or better will be 
invited to apply for a paid internship. The students 
selected will also receive half-tuition scholarship for 
their junior and senior years. 



Carmel Benevento Memorial Scholarship - This 
award is made annually to a woman entering the uni- 
versity as a freshman. The award was established in 
memory of Carmel Benevento and is based on need 
and academic and creative ability. 

Roland & Margaret Bixler Scholarship - This en- 
dowed scholarship is awarded annually. The scholar- 
ship was established by Mr. Bixler, who is a member of 
the UNH Emeritus Board, and his wife, who is co- 
founder of Friends of the UNH Library. 

Norman Botwinik Fund for Academic Excellence - 

This endowed scholarship is awarded annually to an 
undergraduate who over a period of four years has 
demonstrated marked academic achievement. Mr. 
Botwinik is the former Chairman of the UNH Board 
of Governors. 

Bozzuto Charity Sports Classic Scholarship - Income 
from this endowment provides for an annual award to 
a needy student. 

Clarice L. Buckman Scholarship Fund for Chemistry 
and Chemical Engineering - An annual award to a 
junior majoring in chemical engineering or chemistry 
in recognition of achievement and demonstration of 
incentive. 

Coca-Cola Scholarship— Established by the Coca-Cola 
Foundation, an award is made annually to an incom- 
ing freshman who attended the Connecticut Pre- 
Engineering Program (CPEP) at any established 
Connecticut college or university for at least two years. 
The scholarship is renewable over a five-year period. 

Aldo DeDominicis Foundation— Scholarships are 
awarded annually to students majoring in the field of 
communications. Awards are based on financial need 
and academics. 

William DeSenti Scholarship-An annual award is 
made to a needy student in the School of Engineering 
and Applied Science. 

Robert B. Dodds Scholarship-This endowed scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to an engineering student. 
The fund was established by Mr. Dodds as his gift to 
the Fund for Engineering. 



Financial Aid 59 

Clarence Dunham Scholarship-A merit-based award fessor, is made each year to a student who has been 

is made each year to a deserving student majoring in enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences for at least 

civil engineering. Selection is made by the faculty of two years. Student must demonstrate need. 

the civil engineering department. 

Peggy Leuzzi Memorial Scholarship-An annual 

Echlin Family Scholarships— Several annual awards of scholarship award in memory of Mrs. Leuzzi, a former 

$2000 are made to needy business or engineering stu- employee of the university. A scholarship is provided 

dents. The awards are made possible through an to an incoming freshman woman and is made possible 

endowment established through the generosity of John through the generosity of Joseph Macionus. 

and Beryl Echlin. 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Scholarship-An 

Eder Brothers Scholarships-Annual awards are made annual award in honor of Dr. King is made to a 
to hotel/ restaurant management students. The awards deserving, needy student. Preference is given to minor- 
are made possible by Eder Brothers, Inc., of West ity students. 

Haven, Connecticut. 

Ahmed Mandour Memorial Scholarship-An award is 

Ernst & Young Scholarship-An award is made each available each year to a junior or senior student major- 
year from this endowment to a student majoring in ing in economics enrolled as a part-time/evening stu- 
accounting. dent. The award is made in memory of Dr. Mandour, 

a former dean at the university. 
James Jacob Gerowin Memorial Scholarship— An 

award is made to a needy engineering student showing Arnold Markle Scholarship— An annual award to a 
academic promise. The award is in memory of James criminal justice major in memory of Arnold Markle, 
Gerowin of the Class of 1 985. former State's Attorney for the Judicial District of New 

Haven. 
James Gesso Memorial Scholarship-A memorial 

award is made annually to an aviation major with aca- Parents Association Scholarship— This is an endowed 
demic/extracurricular achievement. scholarship funded by the UNH Parents Association. 

William Randolph Hearst Scholarship-This endowed Virginia M. Parker Scholarship-An award is made 

scholarship is made possible through the generosity of each year from this endowed scholarship to an under- 

the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. It is awarded graduate woman by Chi Kappa Rho sorority. 

annually for first generation and minority students. 

H. Pearce Family and Friends Scholarship-This 

Hershey-Frey Scholarship-This endowed scholarship endowed scholarship was made possible through the 

is available to students residing in the Naugatuck Pearce Family, longtime friends and supporters of the 

Valley. This award is funded through the generosity of university. It is awarded to a resident of the State of 

the Paul H. Hershey Foundation and Mildred and Connecticut who demonstrates financial need and 

John Frey. academic ability. 

Paul Kane Memorial Scholarship-An award is avail- Marvin K. Peterson-Evening Student Council 

able each year to an active scholar-athlete with prefer- Scholarship-This scholarship was established by the 

ence to a Hamden, Connecticut, resident. The award Evening Student Council of the University of New 

is made in memory of Paul Kane, a university alumnus Haven in 1969 to honor past President Marvin K. 

who was killed in the service of his country. Peterson (1953-1973). The scholarship, awarded to 

undergraduate part-time/evening students, is entirely 

Nathanial Kaplan Memorial Scholarship-An award funded by the Evening Student Council, 
in memory of Nathanial Kaplan, a former English pro- 



60 



Pilot Pen Scholarships— Annual awards are made Douglas D. Schumann Scholarship— This endowed 

through the generosity of the Pilot Pen Corporation. scholarship is awarded annually, on the basis of per- 

Recipients are selected on the basis of academic sonal and academic integrity, to an engineering stu- 

achievement. dent who has completed his/her freshman year. 



Public Safety Memorial Scholarship — This memorial 
provides a full-tuition, four-year scholarship for a sur- 
viving spouse or child of a law enforcement officer 
slain in the line of duty. Recipients are selected by the 
Connecticut Police Chiefs and Law Enforcement 
Officers Memorial Foundation. Applications are avail- 
able from the Financial Aid Office. 

Rosazza Scholarship— This fund was established in 
memory of Eugene Rosazza, an alumnus of the uni- 
versity, and is made annually to a needy student with 
an exemplary academic record. 

New Haven Wives of Rotarians— An award is made 
annually from this endowment to a female from the 
Greater New Haven area on the basis of academic 
achievement and need. 



Donald R. Scott Scholarship— This scholarship is in 
memory of Donald R. Scott, former Chief of Campus 
Police at UNH, and is awarded jointly by the 
University of New Haven and the West Haven Black 
Coalition. 

Unilever Scholarships — Annual awards are made to 
minority engineering students with financial need. 

Dany J. Washington Scholarship — This scholarship is 
in memory of Dany Washington, former Dean of 
Continuing Education at UNH, and is awarded to 
nontraditional adult students based on scholarship 
and leadership displayed in the university or commu- 
nity environment. 



Arts & Sciences 61 



COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 



Daniel N. Nelson, Ph.D., Dean 

Gordon R. Simerson, Ph.D., Associate Dean 

A liberal education provides excellent preparation 
for careers and lifetime personal development. The 
ideals of a liberal education are intellectual and imagi- 
native growth, freedom of thought and inquiry, and a 
sense of personal w^orth and responsibility. The active 
pursuit of wisdom, the enrichment of the spirit and 
the development of each individual as a person offer 
the world its best hope for the future. 

Recent studies show that such an education pre- 
pares college graduates effectively for a career. These 
graduates are able to adapt to new environments, to 
think critically and conceptually, to integrate broad 
ranges of experience, to set goals and develop inde- 
pendence of thought, to seek leadership roles and to 
possess better overall interpersonal and administra- 
tive skills. These studies also reveal that many stu- 
dents educated in the arts and sciences ultimately 
attain responsible managerial positions in either pri- 
vate or public organizations or in their own business- 
es following the career preparation provided by a lib- 
eral education. 

Education is comprised of many elements, and not 
all education takes place in the classroom or even on 
the campus. The College of Arts and Sciences sponsors 
a monthly faculty forum to encourage an exchange of 
ideas among faculty and students. A guest presenter 
from amongst the faculty speaks on his/her current 
research or other area of expertise; students and other 
faculty members are encouraged to participate in the 
discussion that follows. In addition, other speakers and 
performing artists are regularly brought to the 
University of New Haven campus. Furthermore, the 
College of Arts and Sciences publishes Essays in Arts 
and Sciences, a nationally distributed, refereed journal; 
and the university's library offers an excellent collec- 



tion of books, journals, periodicals, recordings and 
electronic databases including Infotrac, reQuest and 
First Search. 

New Haven is an exciting cultural center which 
offers libraries, natural history museums and art muse- 
ums as well as exhibitions and workshops for dance 
and the creative arts. Long Wharf Theatre is the home 
of an excellent regional company offering a varied fare 
of classics and new plays; the Shubert Performing Arts 
Center has for many years hosted the finest nationally 
known performers on its stage; and the Yale Repertory 
Theatre is innovative and exciting. In addition, the 
Alliance Theatre is in residence at UNH and produces 
a variety of dramatic and musical productions, includ- 
ing children's theater presentations. 

The campus has a well-established university art 
gallery which features renowned artists and sculptors 
at shows scheduled throughout the academic year. 
Also, on. the. wall is a gallery maintained by the Art 
Department. Both of these galleries are located in 
Dodds Hall. 

In the area of music, Orchestra New England 
(ONE) joined the College of Arts and Sciences in 1997. 
Under the musical direction of Maestro James Sinclair, 
ONE has developed a fine reputation as the Chambre 
Orchestra of New England. Founded at Yale in 1974, 
the orchestra consists of 20-35 principal musicians. 

In the College of Arts and Sciences, students are en- 
couraged to pursue a broadly based program of study. 
The College of Arts and Sciences offers programs lead- 
ing to the bachelor of arts degree, the bachelor of sci- 
ence degree, and the associate in science, in addition to 
a number of certificates. Through the Graduate 
School, the College of Arts and Sciences offers pro- 
grams leading to the master of arts degree and the mas- 
ter of science degree along with a number of graduate 
certificates. 



62 



Programs and Concentrations 



Graduate Programs 



Bachelor of Arts 

Art 

Chemistry 
Communication 
English 

Literature 

Writing 
Graphic Design 
History 
Interior Design 

Prearchi lecture 
Liberal Studies 
Mathematics 
Music 

Music Industry 
Music and Sound Recording 
Political Science 
Psychology 

Community-Clinical 

General Psychology 

Bachelor of Science 

Biology 

Premedical/Predental/Preveterinary Medical Biology 

Biochemistry 

General Biology 
Biotechnology 
Dental Hygiene 
Environmental Science 
General Dietetics 
Marine Biology 
Mathematics 

Computer Science 

Natural Sciences 

Statistics 
Music and Sound Recording 

Associate in Science 

Dental Hygiene 
General Studies 
Graphic Design 
Interior Design 



Master of Arts 

Community Psychology 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

Master of Science 

Cellular and Molecular Biology 
Education 

Environmental Science 
Human Nutrition 

Graduate Certificates 

Applications of Psychology 

Geographical Information Systems 

International Relations 

Legal Studies 

Mental Retardation Services 

Psychology of Conflict Management 



Teaching As a Career 

Students interested in earning a teaching certificate 
to qualify to teach at the elementary, middle or sec- 
ondary levels may do so by entering the graduate pro- 
gram in education at UNH. This graduate program 
also offers an internship for interested students. 



Minors 

It is highly recommended that students working 
toward a degree in one area of study give serious 
thought to organizing their elective courses so as to 
receive a minor in a second discipline. A minor usual- 
ly consists of 18 credit hours devoted to the study of 
either a group of courses on related subjects or a series 
of courses offered by one department. 

Students interested in studying for a minor should 
consult with the chair of the department offering the 
minor. 



Arts & Sciences 63 



Certificates 

Students can take their first step toward an under- 
graduate degree by registering for one of the certifi- 
cates offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Each certificate is carefiilly designed as a concentrat- 
ed introduction to a particular subject area and general- 
ly consists of courses totaling 15 to 18 credit hours. 

Later, students may choose to apply the certificate 
credits they have earned toward their undergraduate 
degree at the university. 

Certificates 

Art 

Graphic Design 

Interior Design 

Journalism 

Paralegal Studies 

Public Policy 



Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to the College of Arts and 
Sciences must be a graduate of an approved secondary 
school or the equivalent. While no set program of high 
school subjects is prescribed, an applicant must meet the 
standard of the university in respect to the high school 
average. Applicants must present 1 5 acceptable units of 
satisfactory work, including nine or more units of college 
preparatory subjects. Satisfactory scores on College 
Entrance Examination Board (SAT) or American 
College Testing (ACT) program tests are required. 



University Core Curriculum 

In addition to department requirements, students 
must fulfill all requirements of the core curriculum. 



General Policies in the College 
of Arts and Sciences: 

• Each student will be assigned an academic adviser. 
Normally, this academic adviser is a member of the 
faculty in the major department for the student's 



degree program. 

• A student may select a minor in a department other 
than the major department after consultation with 
the adviser or the appropriate department chair. 

• To receive a degree from the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the last 30 credits must be awarded by the 
University of New Haven. 

• A minimum of 120 semester hours is required for 
graduation. 

Coordinated Course Policy: 

To implement the university's Coordinated Course 
Policy, the College of Arts and Sciences has adopted 
the following additional guidelines: 

1 . A student may take a maximum of two Arts and 
Sciences courses on a coordinated basis. The cours- 
es must be either: (a) upper-division courses, that is, 
equivalent to 300- or 400-level courses at UNH; or 
(b) courses required by the student's major program, 
that is, not Arts and Sciences elective courses. 

2. Coordinated courses from two-year colleges will be 
accepted only for students who have freshman or 
sophomore status at UNH. A student who has com- 
pleted a total of 57 credit hours cannot obtain consent 
for a coordinated course taken at a two-year college. 

3. Any exceptions to the previously stated guidelines 
must be approved by the dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

4. Students should note that in all cases they must 
seek approval before taking a coordinated course. 



B.A., Liberal Studies 

The B.A. in liberal studies serves students whose 
needs are not met by traditional university majors. The 
interdisciplinary nature of this program permits stu- 
dents to integrate courses from several departments for 
the achievement of personalized educational goals. 
Those goals may be directed toward the realization of 
specific career objectives not met by an existing pro- 
gram. The liberal studies program also meets the needs 
of students who need to develop a career focus and 
who wish to learn in a manner that emphasizes the 
inter-relatedness of knowledge. 



64 



All students earning a bachelor's degree in liberal 
studies must complete the university's core curriculum 
requirements as part of the 120-122 credits required 
for the degree. 

Students will also select a minimum of 16 focus 
area courses — that is, eight courses from two of the 
three focus areas listed below. The number of focus 
area courses within a field/department is a minimum 
of three and a maximum of six courses from any one 
discipline. Selection of 48 credits (or more) of courses 
from within these focus areas ensures a breadth of 
study within the liberal studies program. 

Focus Areas 

Humanities: 

Alt 

Communication 

English 

History 

Music 

Philosophy 

Social/Behavioral Sciences: 

Black Studies 
Economics 
Paralegal Studies 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Sociology 

Mathematics/Science: 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Environmental Science 

Mathematics 

Physics 

In consultation with the Arts and Sciences adviser, 
students will develop a personal plan of study. Finally, as 
part of this plan, students will select a departmental 
adviser to assist in the development of an elective 
sequence of 39 credits (or less) to support their academ- 
ic/professional goals. Students may choose their elective 



sequence from the areas of arts and sciences, business, 
engineering, hospitality/tourism or public safety/profes- 
sional studies. Ten 300-level courses must be taken. 



A.S., General Studies 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers the A.S. in 
general studies to serve two different student popula- 
tions. The first is the new or returning student who 
wishes a general liberal arts education for personal 
enrichment. The second type of student is the one 
who is undecided about career objectives and wishes to 
defer the choice of a major field. 

Nearly half of the 61 credit hours required for the 
degree are free electives. This flexibility permits the 
student to take courses in a number of different fields 
prior to choosing a major. By judicious choice of elec- 
tives, it is possible to transfer into majors in any of the 
schools in the university. 

Students planning to transfer to four-year programs 
in the College of Arts and Sciences should note addi- 
tional core requirements in science and mathematics, 
English literature, art and social science, as well as spe- 
cial requirements in particular major programs. 

Required Courses 

Students must complete 61 credit hours of courses to 
earn the associate's degree with a general studies major, 
including the courses listed below: 

E 105 Composition (cc) 

E 110 Composition and Literature (cc) 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times (cc) 

Plus 1 mathematics course: M 109 <?rM \ 27 or 

higher (cc) 
1 literature or philosophy course* (cc) 
1 art, or music, or theatre course* (cc) 
1 computer course* (cc) 
1 science course with laboratory* (cc) 
4 social science courses: EC 133, P HI, PS 121 

and SO 113 (cc) 

cc — Course which satisfies the University Core 
Curriculum requirements. 

* — Courses chosen from the University Core 
Curriculum listing. 



Arts & Sciences 65 



Department of Biology 
and Environmental 
Science 

Chair: Michael J. Rossi, Ph.D. 

Professors Emeriti: Burton C. Staugaard, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut; H. Fessenden Wright, 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Professors: R. Laurence Davis, Ph.D., University of 
Rochester; Charles L. Vigue, Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University; Henry E. Voegeli, 
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Associate Professors: Roman N. Zajac, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut; Michael J. Rossi, 
Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

Assistant Professors: Carmela Cuomo, Ph.D., 
Yale University; Eva Sapi, Ph.D., 
Eotvos Lorand University 

Instructor: James Ayers, M.S., Southern 
Connecticut State University 

Practitioners-in-Residence: Norman Abell, D.P.M., 
Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine; Anthony 
Rossomando, Ph.D., University of Virginia 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in the cat- 
alog or contact the Co-op coordinator for the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 



Biology 

Biology provides one of the cornerstones of a liberal 
education by increasing the knowledge and appreciation 
of oneself and of other living organisms in the ecos- 
phtre. It is an active and exciting field leading to careers 
in drug discovery, medicine, and education. As a major, 
biology prepares the student for professional or gradu- 



ate training, or for technical and research positions in 
one of the health or life science fields. 



B.S., Biology 

Students earning a B.S. with a major in biology 
must complete 122-124 credit hours. Courses include 
the university's core requirements and the course 
requirements for their particular biology concentra- 
tion as indicated below. 



Concentration in 

Premedical/Predental/Preveterinary 
Medical Biology 

This concentration gives the student the basic 
entrance requirements of virtually every U.S. college 
of medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine. 
Entrance into these colleges is highly competitive and 
completion of the concentration does not guarantee 
acceptance into a medical, dental or veterinary medical 
college. Graduates have gone on to pursue medical, 
dental and veterinary medical degrees at such schools 
as Georgetown University, Tufts University, University 
of Connecticut, Ohio State University and the 
University of Tennessee. Students who complete the 
program but decide not to pursue a medical career are 
highly qualified to enter the workforce in one of the 
technically oriented research, health, or related life sci- 
ence fields. In addition to the university's core require- 
ments and seven free electives, the following courses 
are required: 

BI 253-254 Biology for Science Majors with 
Laboratory I and II 
Microbiology with Laboratory 
Cell Biology with Laboratory 
Molecular Biology with Laboratory 
Biochemistry with Laboratory 
Evaluation of Scientific Literature 
CH 115-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CH 201-202 Organic Chemistr)' I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CH 21 1 Quantitative Analysis with Laboratory 



BI 


301 


BI 


308 


BI 


311 


BI 


461 


BI 


493 



66 



BI 
BI 

BI 



HU 300 Nature of Science 

M 117 Calculus I 

M 228 Elementary Statistics 

PH 103-104 General Physics I and II 
with Laboratory 

Plus three of the following: 

BI 303 Cells and Tissues with Laboratory 

304 Immunology with Laboratory 

305 Developmental Biology with 
Laboratory 

309-3 1 Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology 
with Laboratory I and II 
CH 221 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 

Concentration in Biochemistry 

This concentration is most appropriate for those 
students interested in a career in the rapidly growing 
fields of biotechnology and biomedical/pharmaceuti- 
cal research, or for those interested in pursuing an 
advanced degree in biochemistry or molecular biology. 
The program offers extensive hands-on experience in 
biochemical, cellular and molecular techniques. 
Recent graduates from this program are employed at 
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Protein Sciences, Bayer 
Corporation, Pfizer, U.S. Surgical, Neurogen 
Corporation, Cytotherapeutics, Curagen and Yale 
University School of Medicine. In addition to the uni- 
versity's core requirements and seven free electives the 
following courses are required: 

BI 253-254 Biology for Science Majors with 
Laboratory I and II 
Microbiology with Laboratory 
Immunology with Laboratory 
Cell Biology with Laboratory 
Molecular Biology with Laboratory 
Biochemistry with Laboratory 
Evaluation of Scientific Literature 
Protein Biochemistry and Enzymology 
Biochemistry of Bioenergetics 
Nucleic Acid Biochemistry 
CH 115-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry I and II Laboratory 
CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 



BI 


301 


BI 


304 


BI 


308 


BI 


311 


BI 


461 


BI 


493 


BI 


501 


BI 


502 


BI 


503 



CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry I and II Laboratory 
CH 221 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
HU 300 Nature of Science 

M 117 Calculus I 

M 228 Elementary Statistics 

PH 103-104 General Physics I and II 

with Laboratory 



Concentration in General Biology 

This concentration gives the student a general over- 
view of the biological sciences. It is appropriate for the 
student with a broad interest in biology. In addition to 
the university's core requirements and six free electives, 
the following courses are required: 

Biology for Science Majors with 

Laboratory I and II 

Microbiology with Laboratory 

Cell Biology with Laboratory 

Molecular Biology with Laboratory 

Biochemistry with Laboratory 

Evaluation of Scientific Literature 

General Chemistry I and II 

General Chemistry I and II Laboratory 

Organic Chemistry I and II 

Organic Chemistry I and II Laboratory 

Nature of Science 

Calculus I 

Elementary Statistics 

General Physics I and II with Laboratory 

of the following courses: 

Cells and Tissues with Laboratory 

Immunology with Laboratory 

Developmental Biology 

with Laboratory 
BI 309-310 Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology 

with Laboratory I and II 
BI 320 Ecology with Laboratory 

BI 510 Environmental Health 

CH 221 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
EN 500 Environmental Geoscience 



BI 


253-254 


BI 


301 


BI 


308 


BI 


311 


BI 


461 


BI 


493 


CH 


115-116 


CH 


117-118 


CH 201-202 


CH 203-204 


HU300 


M 


117 


M 


228 


PH 


103-104 


Plus four of tl 


BI 


303 


BI 


304 


BI 


305 



Arts & Sciences 67 



B.S., Biotechnology 

The bachelor of science in biotechnology program 
is designed to prepare students to enter the growing 
biopharmaceutical and biotechnical fields. The pro- 
gram integrates courses in biochemistry, genetics, and 
cellular and molecular biology. 

All students earning a B.S. with a major in biotech- 
nology must complete 128 credit hours. Courses 
include the core requirements of the university, the 
required courses listed below and elective courses. 

Required Courses 

BI 253-254 Biology for Science Majors with 

Laboratory I and II 
BI 301 Microbiology with Laboratory 

BI 303 Cells and Tissues with Laboratory 

BI 304 Immunology with Laboratory 

BI 308 Cell Biology with Laboratory 

BI 311 Molecular Biology with Laboratory 

BI 461 Biochemistry with Laboratory 

BI 493 Evaluation of Scientific Literature 

BI 511 Molecular Biology of Proteins 

with Laboratory 
BI 513 Molecular Biology of Nucleic Acid 

with Laboratory 
BI 520 Bioinformatics 

CH 115-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
CH 221 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
HU 300 Nature of Science 

M 117 Calculus I 

M 228 Elementary Statistics 

PH 103-104 General Physics I and II with 

Laboratory 



Environmental Science 

Environmental scientists are employed by munic- 
ipal, state and federal agencies, and by consulting 
companies and businesses both large and small. They 
work on such problems as wetland mapping and pro- 
tection; watershed management; ground and surface 



water contamination; aquifer delineation and protec- 
tion; marine resource management; crop and pest 
management; natural hazards; regulatory compli- 
ance; environmental health and safety; water, waste- 
water and air treatment; and pollution prevention 
and remediation. 

Usually, specialized training is necessary if one 
eventually wishes to hold an administrative job at a 
high salary level. These programs are designed to 
enable students to enter a graduate or specialty school 
to continue their education. Examples of advanced 
study would be a graduate program in environmental 
science or engineering; a school of forestry, planning 
or public health; a program in urban ecology or envi- 
ronmental geology; or even, with proper selection of 
electives, business or law school. 

The B.S. degree program establishes a. solid back- 
ground in the biological and earth sciences, chemistry, 
physics and mathematics in the first three years. In the 
fourth year students concentrate on advanced environ- 
mental science courses. 

A combined five-year B.S. /M.S. program in envi- 
ronmental science is offered to students who have com- 
pleted approximately 75 credit hours (five semesters) of 
undergraduate work, have at least a 3.0 grade point 
average and are recommended by the department. 

B.S., Environmental Science 

Required Courses 

All students earning a bachelor's degree in environ- 
mental science must complete the core requirements 
of the university and the courses listed below: 

EN 1 1 Introduction to Environmental Science 

EN 1 02 Environmental Science Laboratory 

EN 500 Environmental Geoscience 

EN 502 Environmental Effects of Pollutants 

BI 253-254 Biology for Science Majors I and II 

with Laboratory 
BI 320 Ecology with Laboratory 

BI 510 Environmental Health 

CH 1 15-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
CH 211 Quantitative Analysis with Laboratory 

HU 300 Nature of Science 



68 



PH 103-104 General Physics I and II 

with Laboratory 
M 228 Elementary Statistics 

Plus 21 to 28 credit hours of biology, science or 
chemistry electives and a restricted chemistry elective. 

CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II, and 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry 
Laboratory I and II 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra and M 115 

Pre-Calculus, or M 115 Pre-Calculus 
andM 117 Calculus I, or M 1 17-118 
Calculus I and II 

Plus four electives 

B.S., Marine Biology 

This program is designed to prepare students to 
enter the rapidly expanding fields of resource manage- 
ment, environmental assessment and protection, 
biotechnology and education related to estuarine, 
coastal and marine environments. The level of experi- 
ence required for an individual to contribute in these 
fields is not adequately satisfied by an undergraduate 
degree in biology or environmental science; therefore, 
individuals with specific, advanced and focused train- 
ing are needed. This program, with a strong, basic 
emphasis on the biological and chemical sciences, will 
prepare students for these fields. 

Required Courses 

All students majoring in marine biology must com- 
plete the core requirements of the university and the 
following courses: 

BI 253-254 Biology for Science Majors with 

Laboratory I and II 
BI 301 Microbiology with Laboratory 

BI 320 Ecology with Laboratory 

BI 350 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory 

BI 461 Biochemistry with Laboratory 

CH 115-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
HU 300 Nature of Science 

M 117 Calculus I 



M 228 Elementary Statistics 

MR 200 Fundamentals of Oceanography 

MR 300 Marine Ecology with Laboratory 

MR 310 Marine Botany with Laboratory 

MR 320 Marine Pollution 

MR 501-502 Senior Project in Marine Biology I & II 

PH 103-104 General Physics I and II with 
Laboratory 

Plus two of the following: 

CH 221 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
EN 533 Special Topics in Field Geology 

EN 540 Introduction to Geographical 

Information Systems 
MR 330 Coastal Resources and Management 

MR 331 Marine Conservation and Restoration 

MR 410 Marine Aquaculture and Biotechnology 

MR 420 Marine Biogeochemistry with 

Laboratory 

Plus one of the following: 

BI 308 Cell Biology with Laboratory 

BI 311 Molecular Biology with Laboratory 

Plus two electives 

Minor in Environmental Science 

The minor in environmental science provides a use- 
ful background for students majoring in many other 
areas of study if they have concern for the environment. 
For example, students majoring in political science 
might well combine their program with a minor in 
environmental science. Another useful combination is 
an environmental science minor and a major in business 
administration or engineering. 

For specific information concerning a minor in 
environmental science, please consult with the depart- 
ment chair. 

Minor in Biology 

To minor in biology, students must complete those 
courses listed below. In some instances, an upper-level 
biology course can be substituted for general biology. 



Arts & Sciences 69 



BI 121-122 General and Human Biology with 
Laboratory I and II, or BI 253-254 
Biology for Science Majors with 
Laboratory I and II 
BI 261 Introduction to Biochemistry, or 

BI 461 Biochemistry with Laboratory 
BI 301 Microbiology with Laboratory 

BI 308 Cell Biology with Laboratory 

BI 31 1 Molecular Biology with Laboratory 

Minor in Bioengineering 

No rigid group of courses constitutes a minor in 
bioengineering. Students wishing to follow such a pro- 
gram should major in one aspect of engineering and 
take a minor (20 credit hours) in biology; or the biolo- 
gy major program may be combined with a minor or 
concentration in engineering. Consultation with the 
particular engineering and biology department chairs 
should be made before starting the program. 

Teaching Biology 

Students interested in earning a teaching certificate 
in secondary education in biology may enter the grad- 
uate program at UNH. The B.S. in biology with a 
concentration in General Biology is the best choice for 
a major for those planning to teach at the secondary 
level, but other related majors are also acceptable. 
Students interested in teaching science at the middle 
school level need a variety of science courses, including 
biology. Please contact the education department for 
additional information. 



Department of Chemistry 
and Chemical Engineering 



of faculty members and details on other degree pro- 
grams offered by the department. 

B.A., Chemistry 

This program is designed to provide a traditional 
liberal arts background with the basic requirements of 
a chemistry major. 

Required Courses 

All students in the B.A. in chemistry program must 
complete 125 credit hours. These courses must 
include the university core requirements and the 
courses listed below: 



CH 115-116 
CH 117-118 

CH 201-202 
CH 203-204 
CH211 
CH221 

CH 331-332 
CH 333-334 
CH341 
CH411 
CH412 
CH501 
CH521 
EC 133 
M 117-118 
M 203 
PH 150 

PH 205 
Plus 30 credit 



General Chemistry I and II 

General Chemistry I and II 

with Laboratory 

Organic Chemistry I and II 

Organic Chemistry I and II Laboratory 

Quantitative Analysis with Laboratory 

Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 

Physical Chemistry I and II 

Physical Chemistry I and II Laboratory 

Synthetic Methods in Chemistry 

Chemical Literature 

Seminar 

Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Principles of Economics 

Calculus I and II 

Calculus III 

Mechanics, Heat and Waves 

with Laboratory 

Electromagnetism and Optics 

with Laboratory 

hours of electives. 



B.S., A.S., Chemical Engineering 



The department of chemistry and chemical engi- 
neering resides in the School of Engineering and 
Applied Science, but offers the B.A. in chemistry B.S., A.S., Chemistry 
degree program through the College of Arts and MJnor in Chemistry 
Sciences. Please see the departmental listing in the 

School of Engineering and Applied Science section of ^^''''^ programs appear in this catalog under the 

the catalog for additional information, including a list ^^^^^^^ «^ Engineering and Applied Science. 



70 



Teaching Chemistry 

Students interested in earning a teaching certificate 
in secondary education in chemistry may enter the 
graduate program at UNH. The B.A. or B.S. in chem- 
istry is the best choice for a major for those planning to 
teach at the secondary level, but other related majors 
are also acceptable. Students interested in teaching sci- 
ence at the middle school level need a variety of science 
courses, including chemistry. Please contact the educa- 
tion department for additional information. 

Department of 
Communication 

The department of communication resides in the 
School of Business. The B.A. in communication and the 
A.S. in journalism degree programs and the journalism 
certificate are ofi^ered through the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Please see the departmental listing in the School 
of Business section of the catalog for additional informa- 
tion, including a list of faculty members and details on 
other degree programs offered by the department. 

The communication program at the university 
allows each student to develop interpersonal and mass 
communication competencies, skills and awareness 
through a sequence of course offerings. 

Internships are available in a number of regional 
businesses and nonprofit organizations and in both 
print and broadcast media. 

More information about the bachelor's degree pro- 
grams in communication is provided under the School 
of Business section in this catalog. Also included are 
course listings and information concerning communi- 
cation as a minor field of study. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative educa- 
tion program (Co-op) which enables students to combine 
their education with practical, paid work experience in 
their career field. For forther details see "The Co-op Pro- 
gram" which appears earlier in the catalog or contact the 
Co-op coordinator for the College of Arts and Sciences. 



B.A., Communication 

The University of New Haven offers a B.A. and a 
B.S. in communication. 

The bachelor of arts degree program has a strong 
journalism and public relations concentration. In 
addition, interpersonal communication theory is 
emphasized, giving the student a broad background in 
all the elements of the communication field. 



Required Courses 

All students in the B.A. in communication pro- 
gram must complete 121 credit hours. These courses 
must include the university core requirements and the 
following courses: 

CO 100 Human Communication 

CO 101 Fundamentals of Mass Communication 

CO 102 Writing for the Media 

CO 114 Production Fundamentals 

CO 205 Intercultural Communication 

CO 212 Television Production I 

CO 214 Elements of Film 

CO 300 Persuasive Communication 

CO 301 Communication Theory and Research 

CO 302 Social Impact of Media 

CO 306 Public Relations Systems and Practices 

CO 308 Broadcast Journalism 

CO 309 Public Relations Writing 

CO 420 Communication and the Law 

CO 500 Seminar in Communication Studies 

J 201 News Writing and Reporting 

J 311 Copy Desk 

Plus three communication electives 
Plus one history elective 
Plus eight electives 

B.S., Communication 

The university also offers a B.S. in communication 
through the School of Business. 

Communication Certificates 

The communication department ofi^ers certificates in 
journalism and mass communication. Students may 
choose to take these courses on a matriculated or non- 



Arts & Sciences 71 



matriculated basis. For those students who choose the 
nonmatriculated option, it is not necessary to apply to a 
degree program at the university. However, the credits 
earned may be applied toward the requirements for a 
degree program at a later date. 

Journalism Certificate 

The program is designed to provide basic journal- 
ism skills in both print and broadcast media. This cer- 
tificate may supplement students' experience or pre- 
pare them for other areas in their current field of work. 
All students are required to take 15 credit hours, 
including the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

CO 102 Writing for the Media 
CO 309 Public Relations Writing 
J 201 News Writing and Reporting 

Plus two courses from among the following: 

CO 302 Social Impact of Media 

CO 308 Broadcast Journalism 

J 202 Advanced News Writing and Reporting 

J 311 Copy Desk 

J 351 Journalistic Performance 

J 367 Interpretive and Editorial Writing 

Mass Communication Certificate 

For information on the mass communication certifi- 
cate, see the School of Business section of the catalog. 

Department of 
Dental Hygiene 

Director: Sandra D'Amato-Palumbo, M.PS., R.D.H. 

Assistant Professors: Marcella Cornacchia, M.S., 
University of New Haven, R.D.H. ; Sandra 
D'Amato-Palumbo, M.P.S., Quinnipiac College, 
R.D.H.; Mark Kacerik, M.S., University of 
Bridgeport, R.D.H.; Renee Prajer, M.S., 
University of Bridgeport, R.D.H. 



Instructor: Teal Mercer, A.S., University of Bridge- 
port, B.S., Pennsylvania State University, R.D.H. 

The cornerstone of the UNH dental hygiene pro- 
gram is the bachelor of science degree program. This 
program enables the student to be involved in dental 
hygiene coursework throughout all four years of the cur- 
riculum. The course of study integrates science prerequi- 
sites and general (core) education requirements with 
foundation and advanced-level dental hygiene courses. 
Graduates of the bachelor of science program will be pre- 
pared not only to seek employment in private dental 
offices, but also to pursue employment in a variety of 
other health care settings such as dental hygiene and 
dental business/ industry, nursing homes, centers for the 
developmentally disabled, hospitals, home health care 
agencies, correctional facilities and community health 
centers. Bachelor of science degree students also have the 
knowledge and skills necessary to pursue education at 
the graduate level. 

Students who wish to exit the program at the end of 
three years of study may earn an associate in science 
degree in dental hygiene. This program prepares gradu- 
ates for necessary board examinations and employment 
primarily in the dental office setting. The associate's 
degree program integrates science prerequisite courses 
and foundation dental hygiene courses into a three-year 
curriculum. Graduates of the program are positioned to 
practice as dental hygienists, and, if desired, complete 
the bachelor's degree by participating in one additional 
year of study. 

In addition to the programs described above, UNH 
offers a dental hygiene degree completion program. This 
curriculum is designed for practicing dental hygienists 
who are graduates of associate degree programs. The 
degree completion program is designed to enable the 
dental hygienist to transfer credits from an accredited 
dental hygiene program and utilize their academic and 
work experience as the basis for completing coursework 
leading to the bachelor of science degree. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general admission requirements 
for all prospective UNH students, it is recommended 
that applicants to the dental hygiene program demon- 
strate satisfactory performance in the sciences and 



72 



mathematics. It is strongly recommended that appli- 
cants have completed both high school biology and 
chemistry with laboratory and two years of college pre- 
paratory mathematics. An in-person or telephone 
interview with the department director or a faculty 
member is recommended; letters of recommendation 
supporting the student's ability to pursue a rigorous 
science-based curriculum and desire to contribute in 
the health care delivery system are strongly encour- 
aged. Admission to the program is limited, and part- 
time study is available only during the first year of the 
curriculum. All students enrolled in the dental hygiene 
clinical course sequence must be full-time students. 

Professional Accreditation and Licensure 

The program in dental hygiene is accredited by the 
Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American 
Dental Association, a specialized accrediting body rec- 
ognized by the Commission on Recognition of 
Postsecondary Accreditation and by the United States 
Department of Education. 

Students in the program are provided with applica- 
tion materials for the Dental Hygiene National Board 
Examination (written) and the Northeast Regional 
Board Examination (NERB/Clinical). Both the 
National Board Examination and a clinical examina- 
tion are required for program graduates to apply for 
dental hygiene licensure in Connecticut and most 
other states. 

B.S., Dental Hygiene 

Students earning a bachelor of science degree in 
dental hygiene must complete 129-1 31 credit hours. 
The courses must include the university's core require- 
ments for bachelor degree students and the required 
courses listed below. Once students are enrolled in the 
dental hygiene clinical course sequence (DH 220, 240, 
330, 350, 460), they must be enrolled in a full-time 
course of study. 

Required Courses 

DH 105-1 10 Introduction to Dental Hygiene I and II 
CH 105 Introduction to General and Organic 

Chemistry with Laboratory 



CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

HS 102 The Western Wodd in Modern Times 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra, or 

M 127 Finite Math 

P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

SO 113 Sociology 

BI 115 Nutrition and Dietetics 

BI 121 General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I 

DH 214 Oral Facial Structures 

DH 215 Radiology 

DH 220 Dental Hygiene Concepts I 

E 230 Public Speaking and Group 

Discussion, or CO 100 

Human Communication 

DH 240 Dental Hygiene Concepts II 

BI 261 Introduction to Biochemistry 

BI 301 Microbiology with Laboratory 

BI 309-310 Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology I 

and II with Laboratory 

PA 308 Health Care Delivery Systems 

DH 320 Pharmacology and Pain Management 

DH 325 General and Oral Pathology 

DH 327 Periodontology 

DH 330 Dental Hygiene Concepts III 

DH 342 Dental Materials 

DH 350 Dental Hygiene Concepts IV 

DH 423 Instructional Planning and Media 

DH 438 Dental Hygiene Research 

DH 455 Dental Hygiene Public Health 

DH 460 Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice 

DH 461 Oral Medicine 

DH 462 Dental Hygiene Internship 

DH 468 Dental Hygiene Senior Project 

Plus one philosophy or literature elective; one art, 
music or theatre elective; and one scientific 
methods elective 

Plus two three-credit electives 

A.S., Dental Hygiene 

Students earning an associate in science degree in 
dental hygiene must complete 99-101 credit hours. 
The courses must include the university's core require- 



Arts & Sciences 73 



ments for associate's degree students and the required 
courses listed below. Students enrolled in the dental 
hygiene clinical course sequence (DH 220, 240, 330, 
350, 460), must be enrolled in a full-time course of 
study. Those students earning an associate's degree 
must enroll in the clinical course during the designat- 
ed summer session. 

Required Courses 

DH 105-110 Introduction to Dental Hygiene 

I and II 
CH 105 Introduction to General and Organic 

Chemistry 
CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra, or 

M 127 Finite Math 
P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

SO 113 Sociology 

BI 115 Nutrition and Dietetics 

BI 121 General and Human Biology 

with Laboratory I 
DH 214 Oral Facial Structures 

DH 215 Radiology 

DH 220 Dental Hygiene Concepts I 

E 230 Public Speaking and Group 

Discussion, or CO 100 Human 

Communication 
DH 240 Dental Hygiene Concepts II 

BI 261 Introduction to Biochemistry 

BI 301 Microbiology with Laboratory 

BI 309-310 Vertebrate Anatomy and 

Physiology I and II with Laboratory 
DH 320 Pharmacology and Pain Management 

DH 325 General and Oral Pathology 

DH 327 Periodontology 

DH 330 Dental Hygiene Concepts III 

DH 342 Dental Materials 

DH 350 Dental Hygiene Concepts IV 

DH 455 Dental Hygiene Public Health 

DH 460 Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice 

Plus one art, music or theatre elective 



Dietetics 

Program Director: Georgia Chavent, Assistant 
Professor, M.S., Columbia University, R.D. 

The dietetics program is within the Department of 
Biology and Environmental Sciences. 

Dietetic professionals are well equipped to enter the 
health and wellness field. Man-aging the delivery of 
food and providing knowledge of healthy eating to 
hospital patients, physicians, athletes, executive chefs, 
food service managers, food scientists or consumers of 
all ages is the essence of the dietetics field and offers 
exciting challenges for students to prepare themselves 
for varied and growing career opportunities. 

B.S., General Dietetics 

The University of New Haven program in general 
dietetics is designed for students seeking a career as a 
registered dietitian (R.D.). The program includes man- 
agement and clinical coursework that is granted 
approval status by the Commission on Accreditation for 
Dietetics Education of The American Dietetic 
Association, 216 W Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60606- 
6995, (312)899-5400. Graduates are eligible to apply 
for Dietetic Internships or Preprofessional Practice 
Programs. Internships are available for application 
throughout the country and are offered in health care 
settings, corporate food service companies, universities 
or the armed services. Once this supervised practice 
experience is successfully completed, students may take 
the exam to become a registered dietitian. 

A student who has earned a bachelor's or graduate 
degree in another discipline may receive credits toward 
a dietetics degree. Students who have completed a 
bachelor's degree in a health science, business or food 
service field, may be eligible to receive a Verification 
Statement authorizing their entry into a supervised 
practice program. A minimum of six courses must be 
taken at University of New Haven. 

Students earning credits toward a dietetics degree 
may apply for Associate Membership in The American 
Dietetic Association. 

As the general dietetics undergraduate program is 
under the umbrella of the Biology and Environmental 
Science Department in the College of Arts and 



74 



Sciences, it is coordinated with the master of science 
program in human nutrition. 

Required Courses 

A minimum total of 120 credit hours, including 
the university core curriculum, must be completed for 
the bachelor of science degree in general dietetics. The 
program includes the following speciality courses: 

A 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting 

BI 215 Principles of Nutrition 

BI 121-122 General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I and II 
BI 261 Introduction to Biochemistry 

BI 301 Microbiology with Laboratory 

BI 309-310 Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology 

with Laboratory I and II 
BI 315 Nutrition and Disease 

CH 105 Introduction to General and Organic 

Chemistry with Laboratory 
CO 100 Human Communication 

DI 150 Sports Nutrition 

DI 200 Introduction to Food Science 

and Preparation 
DI 214 Menu Planning 

DI 216 Safety and Sanitation 

DI 326 Principles of Dietetics Management 

DI 330 Dietetic Practice in Today's Society 

DI 342 Food Preparation for the 

Health Conscious 
DI 405 Community and Institutional Nutrition 

DI 450 Special Topics 

DI 597 Dietetic Practicum 

E 220 Writing for Business and Industry, 

or E 230 Public Speaking and 

Group Discussion 
MK 300 Principles of Marketing 

PA 308 Health Care Delivery Systems 

Plus one restricted elective 
Plus five electives 

Department of Economics 

The department of economics resides in the School 
of Business. Please see the departmental listing in the 



School of Business section of the catalog for informa- 
tion, including a list of faculty members and details on 
degree programs offered by the department. 

Minor in Economics 

A total of 18 credit hours of work in economics is 
required for the minor in economics. 

Recommended Courses 

EC 133-134 Principles of Economics I and II 
EC 340 Microeconomic Analysis 

EC 34 1 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Plus 9 credits of advanced economics courses. 

Department of Education 

Chair: Shirley Wakin, Ph.D. 

Many UNH undergraduates enter the Education 
Department's master's degree program after gradua- 
tion. This graduate program, which often includes a 
supervised internship, offers three certification tracks: 
(1) elementary education; (2) middle school education 
for the fields of language arts, mathematics, social 
studies and science; and (3) secondary education for 
the fields of language arts, mathematics, social sci- 
ences, biology, chemistry, physics, earth science and 
business. 

For students who are interested in a teaching career, 
preparation should start as an undergraduate. A core 
curriculum in liberal arts and sciences is required along 
with an academic major. In addition, a student must 
have an undergraduate cumulative grade point average 
of 2.70 or higher and must successfully pass the state- 
mandated Praxis I examination. 

Faculty in the Department of Education will be 
happy to advise and assist any undergraduate student 
who needs information about a teaching career and/or 
teacher certification. See the university's Graduate 
Catalog for a more detailed program description. 



Arts & Sciences 75 



Department of English 

Chair: Donald M. Smith, Ph.D. 

Director of Freshman English: Richard J. Farrell, 
M. Phil. 

Professors Emeriti: Paul Marx, Ph.D., New York 
University; Douglas Robillard, Ph.D., Wayne 
State University 

Professors: Srilekha Bell, Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin; David E.E. Sloane, PhD., Duke 
University; Donald M. Smith, Ph.D., New York 
University; Brenda R. Williams, Ph.D., 
Washington University 

Lecturers: Wesley J. Davis, M.A., Southern 

Connecticut State University; Richard J. Farrell, 
M.Phil., Yale University; Stephen A. Listro, M.S., 
Southern Connecticut State University, M.F.A., 
University of Miami; Marianna M. Vieira, M.S., 
University of Bridgeport, M.A., State University 
of New York at Albany 

An English major may choose the concentration 
in either literature or writing. Students in the litera- 
ture concentration develop their analytic skills and 
critical ability by reading widely varied works in the 
English language, from those of William Shakespeare 
to Walt Whitman, Jane Austen to Gwendolyn 
Brooks. The study of English and American literature 
provides a depth and breadth of liberal education as 
it also improves one's thinking, writing and speaking. 
A major in literature is looked upon very favorably by 
admissions officers of law, medical and dental 
schools. It is good preparation for graduate work in 
such fields as business, education, urban planning, 
social work and public health. Employers in many 
areas of business, industry and government seek col- 
lege graduates with broad knowledge and the ability 
to communicate effectively. 

In the writing concentration, students practice a 
variety of written language from the expository essay 
to business and technological applications to more cre- 
ative forms. Some specific areas in which writing skills 
have immediate practical worth are journalism, adver- 
tising, public relations, sales training or promotion. 
Many companies hire writers and editors for company 



periodicals and reports, equipment handbooks and 
service manuals. Publishing houses provide employ- 
ment, of many kinds and on many levels, for persons 
skilled in writing. For writers of proven ability, there 
are numerous opportunities to freelance for trade jour- 
nals, newspapers, magazines and other publications. 
An English major may also prepare for teacher certifi- 
cation at the elementary or secondary level. 

Foreign Language Study 

While study of a foreign language is not required, it 
is strongly recommended that the student who majors 
in English know at least one foreign language. 
Knowledge of a foreign language makes one more sen- 
sitive to the use and meaning of words in one's own 
language. Further-more, knowledge of a foreign lan- 
guage widens one's perspective and deepens one's 
understanding through the insights gained into anoth- 
er culture. Students who are considering graduate 
study certainly should be competent in at least one 
foreign language. 

The Literary Club 

The English Department sponsors the university's 
Literary Club, which is open to all UNH students. Its 
aim is to further interest in the literary arts. It provides 
opportunities for students to attend readings and meet 
informally with established essayists, fiction writers 
and poets. The club also sponsors excursions to Long 
Wharf and the Yale Repertory theaters. The club's pri- 
mary activity is publishing The Elm City Review, a 
journal of students' art and writing. 

Transfer Credit for Writing Courses 

The English department automatically will award 
credit for freshman writing courses taken at an accred- 
ited American college or university if the courses are 
essentially the same as E 105 or E 1 10 and if the stu- 
dent received at least a "C. " If the courses were taken 
at a foreign college, the student will have to demon- 
strate his or her proficiency in writing before credit 
will be awarded. In the latter case, the student should 
make an appointment with the secretary of the English 
department for the writing of a one-hour composition. 



76 



The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program," which appears earlier in the 
catalog, or contact the Co-op coordinator for the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

B.A., English 

Thirty credit hours in English beyond the freshman 
level, with the restrictions indicated below, are required 
for a major in English. All English majors must take the 
university core curriculum and the following courses: 

E 211 Early British Writers 
E 213 Early American Writers 

Plus HS 353 Modern Britain 
Plus 1 7 free electives 

Concentration in Literature 

The literature concentration requires eight addi- 
tional literature courses, at least one from Category I 
and at least two from each of the other three categories 
of upper-level English courses: 

Category I Category II Category III Category IV 

E201 E202 E217 E 214 

E290 E212 E281 E218 

E323 E353 E 392 E 260 

E341 E356 E 395 E 275 

E371 E390 E477 E 394 

E 406-409 E 478 

Concentration in Writing 

The writing concentration requires two additional lit- 
erature courses, each from a different category of the 
above list, and six of the following writing courses: 

E 220 Writing for Business and Industry 

E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation 

E 251 Narrative Nonfiction 

E 267 Creative Writing I 

E 268 Creative Writing II 

E 270 Advanced Essay Workshop 

E 480 Internship 



Teaching Language Arts 

Students interested in earning a teaching certificate 
in middle school or secondary education in language 
arts may enter the graduate program at UNH. The 
B.A. in English is the best choice for a major, but other 
majors are also acceptable. Please contact the educa- 
tion department for additional information. 

Minor in EngUsh 

A total of 1 8 credit hours in literature and/or writ- 
ing courses selected by the student in consultation 
with an English Department adviser. 

Minor in Black Studies 

The minor in Black Studies is an interdisciplinary 
program offered in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and housed in the Department of English. The minor 
consists of courses in English, history, political science, 
sociology and world music. A student may minor in 
this program by completing 18 credit hours of courses 
selected from the following list: 

E 217 African-American Literature I 

E 218 African-American Literature II 

E 481 Studies in Literature: African-American 

Literature Since 1940 
HS 1 20 History of Blacks in the United States 
MU 1 1 2 Introduction to World Music 
MU 550 Studies in Urban Ethnic Music 
PS 205 The Politics of the Black Movement 

in America 
SO 221 Cultural Anthropology 
SO 315 Social Change 
SO 400 Minority Group Relations 

Additional information is available from Dr. 
Donald M. Smith, chair of the English Department. 

Department of History 

Chair: Thomas Katsaros, Ph.D. 

Professors: Joseph B. Chepaitis, Ph.D., Georgetown 
University; Robert Glen, Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley; Thomas Katsaros, Ph.D., 
New York University 



Arts & Sciences 77 



Associate Professor: Edmund N. Todd, Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

History provides a framework for a liberal educa- 
tion. The study of human experience-failures as well 
as achievements-is the core of historical study. It gives 
insight into related disciplines in the humanities and 
social sciences and broadens the perspective of stu- 
dents in professional fields of business and engineering 
by revealing the complexity and interrelatedness of 
human experience. 

Histoty is also excellent preparation for a variety of 
careers in business, government, law, journalism, foreign 
service and many other areas. Because of the great vari- 
ety of professional programs at the University of New 
Haven, the student interested in histoty can combine 
this interest with highly technical professional training. 

The department strives to meet its objectives by 
teaching not only content but critical and writing 
skills through reading, class presentations and discus- 
sion, research and writing. Historical methodology is 
stressed in all advanced courses, and students take the 
history seminar in their senior year to sharpen their 
critical and analytic skills. 

Phi Alpha Theta 

The University of New Haven has a chapter of the 
international honor society in history, Phi Alpha 
Theta, which is open to those students who have had 
12 hours of history or more and have maintained an 
average of better than 3.0 in history courses and better 
than 2.90 overall. The university chapter of Phi Alpha 
Theta provides the students and faculty with a social 
and intellectual experience beyond classroom work, 
offering films, speakers and roundtable discussions. 
Students not eligible for membership in the society are 
welcome to participate in all of the chapter s activities. 

B.A., History 

All students in the B.A. in history program must 
complete 122 credit hours. These courses must 
include the university core requirements and 36 cred- 
it hours of history courses, including those listed 
below. The balance of the program can be arranged in 
consultation with an adviser. 



Required Courses 

HS 101 Foundations of the Western World 
HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

Plus either HS 211 United States Histoty to 1865 
and HS 212 United States Histoty Since 1865, 
or HS 1 10 American Histoty Since 1607 and 
any other United States histoty course 
excluding HS 21 1/212 

HS 260 Modern Asia 

HS 491 Senior Seminar 

Plus one upper-division Asian histoty elective, two 
upper-division courses in European histoty and 
one upper division course in American histoty. 

Plus two electives in histoty. 

Minor in History 

A total of 1 8 credit hours in histoty is required for 
a minor in history. These courses must include the two 
courses listed below and may include any other com- 
bination of four courses in histoty that supports the 
student's interests and needs. 

Required Courses 

HS 101 Foundations of the Western World 
HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

Department of 
Mathematics 

Chair: W. Thurmon Whitley, Ph.D. 

Coordinator of Pre-Calculus Mathematics: 

Ali A. Jafarian, Ph.D. 

Professors Emeriti: Donald Fridshal, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut; Joseph M. Gangler, 
Ph.D., Columbia University; Bruce Tyndall, 
M.S., University of Iowa 

Professors: Ali A. Jalarian, Ph.D., University of 
Toronto; Erik Rosenthal, Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley; Baldev K. Sachdeva, Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University; Ramesh Sharma, 
Ph.D., Banaras Hindu University, Ph.D., 



78 



University of Windsor; James W. Uebelacker, 
Ph.D., Syracuse University; Shirley Wakin, Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts; W. Thurmon 
Whitley, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University. 

Associate Professor: Marc H. Mehlman, Ph.D., 
University of California, Riverside 

The study of mathematics opens the door to a wide 
variety of career opportunities and academic pursuits. 
Mathematics is a major part of the framework of mod- 
ern science and technology. Persons with strong math- 
ematics backgrounds qualify for stimulating occupa- 
tions in an ever-increasing number of fields, from pri- 
vate industry to government service. 

The mathematics department offers a B.A. in 
mathematics. In addition, concentrations in computer 
science, statistics or natural sciences leading to a B.S. 
degree are offered. Students who do not take the com- 
puter science concentration are encouraged to consid- 
er a minor in computer science to be better prepared 
for our technological society. Students majoring in 
other fields may minor in mathematics. 

Mathematics students have direct access to univer- 
sity computing facilities via computer laboratories 
throughout the campus. Several modern computing 
languages are available. The most modern and up-to- 
date data processing packages as well as mathematical 
and statistical software packages have been installed 
and are utilized in instruction. 

Student Awards 

Each year, the mathematics department awards to 
outstanding mathematics students free honorary 
memberships in the Mathematical Association of 
America and the Society for Industrial and Applied 
Mathematics. 

In addition, the department annually awards the 
Bert Ross Mathematics Prize to the outstanding senior 
mathematics major. This award consists of a set of 
mathematics books and a certificate of achievement. 



combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in the cat- 
alog or contact the Co-op coordinator for the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Basic Courses Required for All 
Mathematics Majors 

All students earning a bachelors degree in mathe- 
matics must complete the university core requirements, 
the course requirements for their particular math pro- 
gram, and the basic math courses listed below: 

M 117-118 Calculus 1 and II 

M 203 Calculus III 

M 204 Differential Equations 

M 305 Discrete Structures 

M 308 Introduction to Real Analysis 

M 311 Linear Algebra 

M 321 Modern Algebra 

M 331 Combinatorics, or 

M 361 Mathematical Modeling 

M 338 Numerical Analysis 

M 371 Probability and Statistics I 

M 472 Probability and Statistics II 

M 491 Department Seminar 

B.A., Mathematics 

This program is designed to provide students with a 
broad overview of mathematics and its applications, espe- 
cially for students who wish to study pure mathematics, 
or for those whose career objectives include mathematics 
education or the application of mathematics to such 
fields as business, economics or the social sciences. 

Students earning a B.A. with a mathematics major 
must complete a minimum 125 credit hours. These 
courses must include the basic courses required for all 
mathematics majors, which are listed above, the uni- 
versity core requirements listed earlier in this catalog, 
and the courses listed below: 



Required Courses 
The Co-op Program CS 1 10 Introduction to C Programming I 

The department participates in the cooperative CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 



Arts & Sciences 79 



PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with Laboratory 

Plus 6 credit hours of mathematics, compatible with 
area of concentration, M 300 series or above. 

Teaching Mathematics 

Students interested in earning a teaching certificate 
in middle school or secondary education in mathe- 
matics may enter the graduate program at UNH. The 
B.A. in mathematics is the best choice for a major, but 
other majors are also acceptable. Please contact the 
education department for additional information. 

B.S., Mathematics 

Students interested in applied mathematics should 
pursue the B.S. degree. Within this degree program, 
the concentrations of computer science, natural sci- 
ences and statistics are offered. 

Students earning a B.S. with a major in mathematics 
must complete a minimum of 125 credit hours. These 
courses must include the basic courses required for all 
mathematics majors listed above, the university core re- 
quirements listed earlier in the catalog, and the courses 
listed below for one of the three concentrations. 

Concentration in Computer Science 

This program is primarily for students interested in 
using computing techniques to solve mathematical 
problems in a wide variety of disciplines. In addition 
to the mathematics requirements, students take eight 
or nine courses in computer science designed to pro- 
vide training in the structure of computer languages, 
computing machines and computing systems. 

Students in this program must complete a minimum 
of 125 credit hours. These courses must include the basic 
courses required for all mathematics majors, which are 
listed above, the university core requirements listed ear- 
lier in this catalog, and the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

CS 1 10 Introduction to C Programming I 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

CS 326 Data Structures and Algorithms II 



CS 310 Computing Theory 

PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with Laboratory 

Plus 9 credit hours in computer science; 9 credit 
hours in mathematics, chemistry or physics. 

Concentration in Natural Sciences 

This program is primarily for students whose math- 
ematical interests are in the application of mathematics 
to such fields as physics, chemistry, operations research 
and engineering. In addition to the courses listed below, 
the students take five to seven courses in a single disci- 
pline of the natural sciences or engineering. 

Students in this program must complete a mini- 
mum of 127 credit hours. These courses must 
include the basic courses required for all mathemat- 
ics majors, which are listed above, the university core 
requirements listed earlier in this catalog, and the 
courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

CS 1 10 Introduction to C Programming I 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 

with Laboratory 
CH 1 15/CH 1 17 General Chemistry I and 

Laboratory 

Plus 6 credit hours of mathematics, compatible with 
area of concentration, M 300 series or above. 

Concentration in Statistics 

This program is designed to provide students with a 
background in mathematical statistics. The mathemat- 
ics courses required are basic courses necessary to enable 
a person to gain employment as a statistician in business 
or government, or to pursue graduate study in statistics. 
These courses are also necessary for students wishing to 
pursue careers in the actuarial field. 

Students in this program must complete a minimum 
of 125 credit hours. These courses include the basic 
courses required for all mathematics courses which are 



80 



listed above, the university core requirements listed ear- 
lier in the catalog, and the courses listed below: 

Required Courses 

M 473 Advanced Statistical Inference 

M 481-482 Linear Models I and II 
CS 110 Introduction to C Programming 1 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

PH 150 Mechanics, Heat and Waves 

with Laboratory 

Plus 12 credit hours in science, computer science 
or mathematics. 

Minor in Mathematics 

Students may minor in mathematics by complet- 
ing six mathematics courses approved by the depart- 
ment. Those students contemplating a minor in math- 
ematics should consult with the department as early as 
possible in their academic careers as to the choice and 
availability of courses. 

Required Courses 

M 118 Calculus II 
M 203 Calculus III 
M 311 Linear Algebra 

Plus 9 credit hours of mathematics courses which 
complement the major area of interest. 

Recommended Courses 

M 204 Differential Equations 

Any course in the M 300 series or above. 



Philosophy looks at fundamental assumptions 
about the nature of reality and human existence. Are 
people nothing but organic robots with computer 
brains? Or do we have eternal souls? Is it possible to 
love unselfishly? Is reason the slave of the passions? Is 
it better to be a human being dissatisfied than a pig 
satisfied? Do we have fundamental obligations to our- 
selves? ... to other humans? ... to other animals? . . . 
to the environment? ... to certain principles? 

Philosophy courses at UNH examine the major 
world traditions of thought from ancient times to the 
present. Emphasis is placed on ethical inquiry, includ- 
ing the application of ethical thinking to our daily and 
professional lives. 

Minor in Philosophy 

The minor in philosophy provides ample opportu- 
nity to consider many fascinating and important ques- 
tions like the ones mentioned above. It is also very use- 
ful-philosophy has helped people prepare for careers 
in such diverse fields as computer systems program- 
ming, engineering, management, insurance, market- 
ing, publishing, real estate, technical writing, govern- 
ment, human services, journalism, law, medicine, 
teaching and research. 

The minor in philosophy consists of 18 credits. 
The program is flexible; courses run frequently, day 
and evening, and can be taken in any order. Also, it is 
usually possible for students to cap their philosophical 
careers at UNH with independent study which lets 
them concentrate on a single topic of interest and set 
up their own schedule. For more details, contact the 
philosophy department. 



Department of Philosophy Department of Physics 



Chair: Joel H. Marks, Ph.D. 

Professor: Joel H. Marks, 

Ph.D., University ofConnecticut 

Assistant Professor: Robert J. Rafalko, 
Ph.D., Temple University 

Practitioner-in Residence: David Brubaker, Ph.D., 
University of Illinois 



Chair: W. Thurmon Whitley Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors: Matthew Griffiths, Ph.D., 
University of Edinburgh; Kauser Yasmin, Ph.D., 
New Mexico State University 

Physics is concerned with the most basic aspects of 
our knowledge of the natural world. It is a subject in 
which experiment and theory evolve constantly to pro- 



Arts & Sciences 8 1 



vide a precise and simple description of the physical 
phenomena around us in terms of a relatively small 
number of physical laws and theories. 

As a fundamental science, physics is at the root of 
almost all branches of science and technology. It has 
provided the microscopic basis for chemistry, has 
stimulated important developments in mathematics, is 
the basis of most branches of engineering and, during 
the past decade, has proved to be increasingly valuable 
to the life sciences. 

Consequently, a basic knowledge of physics is 
excellent preparation for diverse careers: research in 
university and government laboratories, industrial 
research and development, applied science and engi- 
neering, biological and medical sciences, research in 
environmental problems, and teaching at all levels 
from the elementary school to the university. It also 
prepares students for careers in non-physics-related 
fields such as philosophy, business and law. 

The university does not currently offer a bachelor's 
degree program in physics. The department does, 
however, offer a minor in physics suitable for majors in 
any of the university's schools and departments. A 
physics minor is particularly valuable for students in 
chemistry, environmental science, biology, forensic sci- 
ence, fire science or occupational safety as well as for 
any student planning to teach any science at the ele- 
mentary or secondary level. A special physics minor 
concentration is available for students interested in 
careers in journalism, public management or public 
policy areas. 

The physics minor requires a total oi 20 credit 
hours of work in physics. Students should plan their 
minor in consultation with a faculty adviser in the 
physics department. 

Required Courses 

PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with Laboratory 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
PH 211 Modern Physics 

Plus 9 credit hours of selected physics courses 
depending on the career interests of the student. 



Department of 
Political Science 

Chair: Natalie J. Ferringer, Ph.D. 

Professors: Lawrence]. DeNardis, Ph.D., New York 
University; Caroline A. Dinegar, Ph.D., Columbia 
University; James W. Dull, Ph.D., Columbia 
University; Natalie J. Ferringer, Ph.D., University 
of Virginia; Joshua H. Sandman, Ph.D., 
New York University 

A major in political science provides the student with 
a foundation for a career in government on the local, 
state, national and international levels; for a career in 
law; for graduate school programs in political science, in- 
ternational relations and public policy; and. for careers in 
the areas of campaign management, communication, 
public relations and business. All political science and 
prelaw majors or minors should discuss career goals and 
educational objectives with a department adviser within 
one month of entrance into the program. 

Further, advice on the Law School Admissions Test 
(LSAT) and the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
preparation courses, which our prelaw and graduate 
school-oriented students are urged to take, is available 
through the department. 

Prelaw majors and minors in the department of 
political science have been especially successful in gain- 
ing entrance to law schools throughout the country. 

The political science faculty grants the Rollin G. 
Osterweis Award for Excellence in Political Science to 
an outstanding political science student. 

B.A., Political Science 

All students in the B.A. in political science program 
must complete 121 credit hours. These courses must 
include the university core requirements and 48 cred- 
it hours of political science courses, including those 
listed below: 

Required Courses 

PS 121 American Government and Politics 

PS 1 22 State and Local Government and Politics 



82 



PS 241 International Relations 

PS 243 International Law and Organization 

Plus one of PS 281, 282, 283, 285 Comparative 

Political Systems 
Plus one of PS 304, 308, 309 Political Parties, 

Legislative Process, The American Presidency 

PS 332 Constitutional Law 

PS 461 Political Theory: Ancient and Medieval 

PS 462 Political Theory: Modern and Contemporary 

PS 499 Senior Seminar I 

Plus 18-21 hours of political science electives to be 
chosen with student's department adviser. 

Minor in Political Science 

The department of political science offers several 
course clusters for students from other disciplines 
who wish to enhance their degree programs. The 
minor consists of 18 credit hours of political science 
courses, chosen with a department adviser. Several 
three-course clusters are suggested below for inclu- 
sion in the minor to address particular interests. In 
each case, nine additional credit hours are to be cho- 
sen in consultation with a department adviser. 

American Government 

PS 121 American Government and Politics 

PS 1 22 State and Local Government and Politics 

PS 332 Constitutional Law 

International Relations 

PS 241 International Relations 

PS 243 International Law and Organization 

PS 281-285 Comparative Political Systems 
(at least one) 

Legal Studies 

PS 230 Anglo-American Jurisprudence 
PS 231 Judicial Behavior 
PS 332 Constitutional Law 

General Political Science 

Students whose needs are best served by a mixture of 



political science courses may construct an individualized 
minor in consultation with a departmental adviser. 

One additional minor cluster is offered through the 
Institute of Law and Public Affairs as follows: 

Certificate in Public Policy 
(Campaign Management) 

A certificate in public policy is issued to students 
who complete 1 8 credit hours of courses in areas of 
public affairs designed to serve the student's intellectu- 
al and professional needs. An example is the program 
in campaign management. 

Required Courses 

PS 121 American Government and Politics 

Plus five of the following: 

PS 224 Public Attitudes and Public Policy 
PS 340 Campaign Management: Procedures 

and Operations 
PS 341 Campaign Management: Structure 

and Organization 
PS 344 Campaign Management: Survey Research, 

Polling, Computers 
PS 346 Campaign Management: Financing 

and Election Laws 
PS 450 Campaign Management: Internship 

Additional related elective courses may be selected 
with the approval of a departmental adviser. 



Department of 
Psychology 



Chair: Thomas L. Mentzer, Ph.D. 

Professors: Robert J. Hoffnung, Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati; Arnold Hyman, Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati; Thomas L. Mentzer, Ph.D., Brown 
University; Michael Morris, Ph.D., Boston 
College; Michael W. York, Ph.D., University 
of Maryland 

Associate Professor: Gordon R. Simerson, Ph.D., 
Wayne State University 



Arts & Sciences 83 



Assistant Professor: Tara L'Heureux-Barratt, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Psychology faces the questions that are of most 
immediate concern to the individual: problems such as 
personal identity, the social context, normalcy versus 
deviance and behavior change. As a science, psycholo- 
gy is devoted to the understanding, prediction and 
control oi behavior. 

Our dedication to these goals requires that we 
study behavior from a number of viewpoints— develop- 
ment, learning, social, physiological, abnormal per- 
sonality — each fascinating in its own right. The stu- 
dent's attention is drawn also to the many settings in 
which behavior occurs, from the family to the labora- 
tory, from the clinic to the marketplace. This great 
diversity ensures that the study of psychology will 
interrelate well with other courses in the humanities 
and sciences. 

The undergraduate program in the department of 
psychology combines basic science and applications to 
prepare students for further professional training in 
psychology or for careers in human services delivery, 
law, education, business and industry. 

The program features a specialty concentration in 
community — clinical psychology for those students 
who have well-defined professional goals. The gener- 
al psychology concentration permits students to tai- 
lor their preparation toward other specialty areas. 
Psychology majors are encouraged to broaden their 
preparation by taking courses or minors in sociolo- 
gy, political science, social welfare, management, 
computer science, criminal justice, mathematics and 
biology. 

The psychology major develops skills in design and 
analysis of research and effective communication 
through the study of statistics, experimental methods, 
psychological measurement and psychological theory. 
Through involvement with behavior therapy and com- 
munity psychology field work, the student can con- 
front behavior problems in a more direct, practical 
fashion. The department feels that it is only through a 
thorough grounding in basic skills and principles that 
students can effectively realize their goals. 

The psychology program benefits from a psycholo- 
gy laboratory building on the main campus. The lab- 



oratory contains facilities for student and faculty 
research with human and animal subjects. Specialized 
apparatus permits the study of human and animal 
learning, sensory capacities, social processes and bio- 
feedback control. 

The University of New Haven also offers the mas- 
ter of arts degree in community psychology and indus- 
trial/organizational psychology as well as a graduate 
certificate in applications of psychology. For descrip- 
tions of these programs, see the Graduate School 
catalog. 

Psychology Club 

Students in psychology have the opportunity to 
participate in the Psychology Club. Its purpose is to 
provide opportunities both to socialize and to develop 
students' interests in the science and profession of psy- 
chology. Throughout the year, the club sponsors guest 
lecturers and a variety of field trips. All students are 
welcome to join. 

Psi Chi Honor Society 

Membership in the university chapter of Psi Chi, 
the national honor society, is open to students in the 
top 35 percent of their class who have completed at 
least nine credit hours of psychology with grades of B 
or better, and who are making the study of psycholo- 
gy one of their major interests. 

Graduating seniors also may nominate them- 
selves for the annually-awarded McGough psycholo- 
gy prize. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program " which appears earlier in the cat- 
alog or contact the Co-op coordinator for the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

B.A., Psychology 

The B.A. in psychology program requires the comple- 



84 



tion of 120 credits, 43 of which are required to com- 
plete the major. 

Required Courses 

P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

P 301 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 

P 305 Experimental Methods in Psychology 

P 306 Psychology Laboratory 

P 315 Human and Animal Learning 

P 34 1 Psychological Theory 

P 361 Behavioral Neuroscience 

The required courses comprise 22 credit hours of 
the 43 required for the major. To complete the major, 
students must complete 6 credit hours of psychology 
restricted electives and one of the two 1 5-credit-hour 
concentrations described below. 

The psychology restricted electives are selected by 
the student in consultation with the academic adviser. 
Suggested electives for the community-clinical con- 
centration are: P 316, P 321, P 331, P332, P 351, P 
370. 

Psychology majors are required to take a number of 
courses in other departments, some of which satisfy 
university core curriculum requirements: BI 121 and 
BI 122 General and Human Biology I and II; M 127 
Finite Mathematics; SO 113 Sociology; one Hterature 
and one philosophy elective, one of which must be 
from the core curriculum approved course list. 

It should be noted that M 127, P 301 and P 305 
constitute a sequence of courses incorporating com- 
puter use. Those courses satisfy the core curriculum 
computer literacy requirement and must be taken in 
that order. 

Concentration in Community- 
Clinical Psychology 

P 216 Psychology of Human Development 
P 330 Introduction to Community Psychology 
P 336 Abnormal Psychology 
P 350 Human Assessment 
P 375 Foundations of Clinical/Counseling 
Psychology 



Concentration in General Psychology 

The general psychology concentration consists of 
15 credit hours of psychology electives beyond the 
required courses. 

Minor in Psychology 

Psychology, perhaps more than any other subject, 
relates closely to many other disciplines. A minor in 
psychology prepares you for graduate study in the field 
and can add another dimension to your studies in 
other programs at the university. A total of six courses 
is required for a minor in psychology. 

Required Courses 

P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

P 301 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 

P 305 Experimental Methods in Psychology 

Plus 9 additional credits of psychology electives. 

Exceptions to the requirements above can be made 
for students whose major programs contain required 
courses that are equivalent to P 301 and P 305 (such as 
CJ 25 1 and CJ 250.) Such students may be permitted to 
substitute advanced psychology courses for P 301 and 
P 305. Exemptions will be granted on a case by case basis 
by the chairperson of the Psychology Department. 

Department of Sociology 

Chair: Thomas L. Mentzer, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor: Alfred Bradshaw, Ph.D., 
Syracuse University 

Sociology is the study of social life and the social 
causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociolo- 
gy's subject matter ranges from analysis of families, 
corporations, cities and sports to sexuality, death, race, 
gender and ethnicity as well as the impact of demo- 
graphic and environmental policies and other social 
phenomena. The sociological perspective is empirical- 
ly grounded and sufficiently broad to be relevant to 
those considering careers in related fields such as 
research, govern-mental service, social work, personnel 
management, advertising, law, medicine, journalism. 



Arts & Sciences 85 



social gerontology, and hospitality and tourism. 

The University of New Haven does not currently 
offer a major in Sociology. For those students wishing 
to satisfy core or elective requirements, or for students 
who may wish to select sociology or social welfare as a 
minor, a selection of courses is offered. 

Department of Visual 
and Performing Arts 

Chair: Guillermo E. Mager, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: Elizabeth J. Moffitt, M.A., 
Hunter College 

Professors: Ralf E. Carriuolo, Ph.D., Wesleyan 
University; Michael G. Kaloyanides, Ph.D., 
Wesleyan University; Joel H. Marks, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Associate Professor: Guillermo E. Mager, Ph.D., 
New York University 

Assistant Professors: Albert G. Celotto, M.M., 
Indiana University; Bernard J. Keilty, M.A., 
Georgetown University; Christy A. Somerville, 
M.A., California State University — Long Beach 

Artist-in-Residence: James Sinclair, M.A., University 
of Hawaii, Music Director of Orchestra New 
England 

Practioner-in-Residence: David J. Skora, M.EA., 
School of Visual Arts 

Visual Arts 

Coordinator, Graphic Design: Bernard J. Keilty, Jr., 
M.A. 

Coordinator, Interior Design: Christy A. Somerville, 
M.A 

Study of the visual arts provides an opportunity for 
self-realization and gives the individual a perception of 
his relationship to society. Foundation courses in the 
basics of two- and three-dimensional design, color and 
drawing, plus work in such major disciplines as paint- 
ing, sculpture and the use of computers as a design 



tool, provide the student with the necessary vocabu- 
lary for effective visual communication. 

Knowledge of the development of art throughout 
human cultural evolution from the cave era to present 
day is provided through studies in art history and the 
contemporary art scene. Thus, equipped with a work- 
ing vocabulary of visual form and a sense of art histo- 
ry, students progress toward the goal of making a 
mature visual statement in their chosen fields. 

University of New Haven art programs provide 
preparation for graduate study or career opportunities 
in fields related to art, graphic design, interior design 
and architecture. 

Students in all B.A. art programs listed below must 
complete at least 121 credit hours. These courses must 
include the core requirements for the university and 
the required courses as listed for each program. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in the 
catalog or contact the Co-op coordinator for the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

Basic Courses Required for Art Majors, B.A. 

AT 105-106 Basic Drawing I and II 

AT 201 Painting I 

AT 211-212 Basic Design I and II 

AT 213 Color 

AT 231-232 History of Art I and II 

AT 401-402 Studio Seminar I and II 

Basic Courses Required for Art Majors, A.S. 

AT 211-212 Basic Design I and II 
AT 213 Color 

B.A., Art 

This program is designed to assist students in discov- 
ering their potential for creative expression in the plas- 
tic arts and the development of a personal idiom in the 



86 



disciplines of their own choosing including painting, 
sculpture, drawing, printmaking, etc. Acquisition of 
an effective visual vocabulary is promoted by founda- 
tion courses in two- and three-dimensional design, 
color and drawing. Art historical studies provide per- 
spective on the art forms of the past. 

The program prepares students for graduate study 
in art as well as for career opportunities in a broad 
spectrum of art and art-related fields. 

Required Courses 

Basic courses required for art majors, B.A., and the 
following: 

AT 101-102 Introduction to Studio Art I and II 

AT 202 Painting II 

AT 205 Ceramics I 

AT 209 Photography I 

AT 302 Figure Drawing 

AT 304-305 Sculpture I and II 

AT 315 Printmaking 

Plus one art history elective and two art electives. 
Plus seven electives 

B.A., Graphic Design 

Graphic design, the art of visual communication 
through words and pictures, is an expanding discipline 
in current society. Posters, publications, identity sys- 
tems, graphs, diagrams, information design, signage 
and exhibits are components of the visual environ- 
ment in which we live. The graphic designer's duty is 
to bring clarity and visual aesthetics to communication 
through an understanding of theory, design practice 
and technology. 

The introductory courses in the graphic design pro- 
gram concentrate on basic design vocabulary, compo- 
sition, color perception, drawing, introduction to the 
use of computers as a design tool and photography. 
The junior and senior year education focuses on typo- 
graphic studies, illustration, critical analysis, problem- 
solving methodology, advanced computer projects and 
complex applied design projects, preparing the stu- 
dents for entry-level graphic design positions in design 
studios, corporations and agencies, as well as for grad- 
uate studies in the field. 



Required Courses 

Basic courses required for art majors, B.A., and the 
following: 

AT 122 Graphic Design Production 

AT 203-204 Graphic Design I and II 

AT 209 Photography I 

AT 221-222 Typography I and II 

AT 309 Photographic Design 

AT 315 Printmaking 

AT 322 Illustration 

AT 401-402 Studio Seminar I and II 

AT 403-4 1 2 Selected Topics (one course) 

AT 599 Independent Study (Graphic Design) 

MK 307 Advertising and Promotion 

Plus a course in computer design and a senior project. 
Plus five electives 

B.A., Interior Design 

Studies in the interior design programs are organized 
to focus on the technology of a built environment, pro- 
gramming and three-dimensional composition. Students 
explore the relationship between interior designers and 
their clients, the interaction between designers and archi- 
tects, and methods of communication between designers 
and fabricators. In addition to interior design problems, 
students are given the opportunity to develop their stu- 
dio art skills, CAD and other computer skills, and their 
presentation techniques. Core coursework includes 
architectural drawing, building construction, color theo- 
ry, history of interior design and textile design. 

Required Courses 

Basic courses required for art majors, B.A., and the 
following: 

AT 216 Architectural Drawing 

AT 233 History of Architecture and 

Interior Design 

AT 302 Figure Drawing 

AT 304 Sculpture I 

AT 317 Interior Design 

AT 322 Illustration 

AT 331 Contemporary Art 

AT 401-402 Studio Seminar I and II 

CE 302 Building Construction 



Arts & Sciences 87 



Plus courses in computer architectural drawing and 
architectural presentation techniques, topics in 
business practices, interior products and specifi- 
cations, interior perspective and rendering tech- 
niques, lighting design, internship, independent 
study, etc., and a senior project. 

Recommended Electives 

AT 203 Graphic Design I 

AT 309 Photographic Design 

MM 301 Introduction to Multimedia 



CE 403 City Planning 

M 115 Pre-Calculus 

M 117 Calculus I 

PH 100 Introductory Physics with Laboratory 

Plus courses in architectural drawing and architectur- 
al presentation techniques, CAD (computer 
aided design) drawing, topics in business prac- 
tices, lighting design, internship, independent 
study, etc., and a senior project. 

A.S., Graphic Design 



Concentration in Interior 
Design/ Prearchitecture 

The prearchitecture concentration provides a thor- 
ough preparation for students planning to enter a pro- 
fessional degree program at the graduate school level. 
It also provides architecturally oriented training for 
those who might wish to seek employment in this and 
related areas such as city planning or landscape design. 
Liberal arts, technological studies and studio arts are 
carefully integrated into a balanced curriculum. 
Students gain insight into the relationship between 
architects and clients, investigate the nature of build- 
ing and develop skills in presentation methods. 

Coursework includes the history of architecture, 
architectural drawing, building construction, appro- 
priate civil engineering studies, CAD and other com- 
puter skills, and studio art courses in color and design. 

Required Courses 

Basic courses required for art majors, B.A.., and the 
following: 

AT 216 Architectural Drawing 

AT 233 History of Architecture and 

Interior Design 

AT 302 Figure Drawing 

AT 304 Sculpture I 

AT 317 Interior Design 

AT 322 Illustration 

AT 331 Contemporary Art 

AT 401-402 Studio Seminar I and II 

CE 302 Building Construction 



Required Courses 

Basic courses required for art majors, A.S., and the 
following: 

AT 122 Graphic Design Production 

AT 203 Graphic Design I 

AT 209 Photography I 

AT 221-222 Typography I and II 

AT 309 Photographic Design 

Plus the university's associate's degree core. 
A.S., Interior Design 

Required Courses 

Basic courses required for art majors, A.S., and the 
following: 

AT 216 Architectural Drawing 

AT 233 History of Architecture and Interior Design 

AT 302 Figure Drawing 

AT 304 Sculpture I 

AT 317 Interior Design 

AT 322 Illustration 

AT 331 Contemporary Art 

CE 302 Building Construction 

Plus the university's associate's degree core. 



M 



inor in 



Art 



A total of 18 credit hours of work in art is required 
for the minor in art. Students may take the courses 
listed below and any other combination of courses that 
fills their needs and interests. 



88 



Recommended Courses 

AT 201 Painting I 

AT 211 Basic Design I, or AT 212 Basic 

Design II 
AT 213 Color 

AT 231-232 History of Art I and II 
AT 304 Sculpture I, or AT 305 Sculpture II 

Art Certificates 

The art department offers certificates in graphic 
design and interior design. Students must complete 15 
credit hours of required courses to earn a certificate. 
Students may choose to take these courses on a matricu- 
lated or nonmatriculated basis. For those students who 
choose the nonmatriculated option, it is not necessary to 
apply for admission to a degree program at the universi- 
ty. However, the credits earned may be applied toward 
the requirements for a degree program at a later date. 

Graphic Design Certificate 

This certificate is designed for individuals em- 
ployed in advertising, printing, photography, public 
relations and marketing as well as architects and those 
interested in entering the field of graphic design. 
Designed to broaden and update commercial art skills, 
the certificate courses emphasize layout, design and 
the principles of effective design communication. All 
students are required to take 18 credit hours, chosen 
from the seven courses listed below: 

Required Courses (Choose 6) 

AT 105 Basic Drawing I 

AT 122 Graphic Design Production 

AT 203-204 Graphic Design I and II 

AT 211 Basic Design I 

AT 221-222 Typography I and II 

Interior Design Certificate 

This certificate was developed for individuals seek- 
ing a professional knowledge of design and decorating 
skills applicable to both home and office decoration. 
All students are required to take 15 credit hours, cho- 
sen from the eight courses listed below: 



Required Courses (Choose 5) 

AT 105 Basic Drawing I 

AT 211-212 Basic Design I and II 



AT 213 


Color 


AT 216 


Architectural Drawing 


AT 233 


History of Architecture and 




Interior Design 


AT 317 


Interior Design 


CE 302 


Building Construction 



Multimedia/Web 
Creation Studies 

Coordinator: Guillermo E. Mager, Ph.D. 

Multimedia is the use of computers for the inte- 
gration of graphics, animation, video, music, speech 
and live presentation. Active markets for multimedia 
include (1) the Internet, where careers in web page 
creation and web site management have grown expo- 
nentially in recent years; (2) business, where com- 
puter presentations have taken the place of slide 
shows; (3) education, where teachers and parents are 
finding new ways to present their material; and (4) 
the entertainment industry, with the ever-growing 
use of computers for special effects in games, music 
videos and films. 

Multimedia studies will enable graduates from pro- 
grams in graphic design, music, education, business and 
many other disciplines to use the computer not only to 
generate traditional print materials but also to design 
interactive programs for use in web sites, CD-ROMs, 
business presentations, games and educational sofiw^are. 

The multimedia courses and the web page creation 
courses have been designed to allow students to use com- 
puter, audio, video and graphic technologies to concep- 
tualize and implement interactive interfaces in a compre- 
hensive approach that includes the multimedia produc- 
tion process, the technology and the aesthetic design. 

Minor in MultimediaAX'eb Creation 

A total of seven courses (21 credits) are required to 
complete the minor in multimedia/web creation. 



Arts & Sciences 89 



Required courses (9 credits): 

MM 301 Introduction to Multimedia 
MM 31 1 Advanced Multimedia, or 

MM 312 Web Creation 
MM 401 Multimedia Seminar 

Plus two of the following sequences (12 credits)**: 

MU 31 1-312 Multitrack Recording I and II 

AT 203-204 Graphic Design I and II 

CO 212-312 Television Production I and II 

** These courses must be taken outside the student's 
major area of study (for example, music majors may 
not use MU 311-312). Also, note that some of these 
courses have prerequisites. 



Theatre Arts 



Theatre courses may be used to satisfy the arts core 
requirements. Refer to the latest class schedule bulletin 
to determine the specific courses permitted. 

Productions 

The university community may take part in all 
department productions. Volunteers may act in pro- 
ductions as well as help with lighting, set and cos- 
tume design, set construction, publicity and stage 
management. Participants need not be enrolled in 
theatre classes. 

Minor in Theatre Arts 

Students may complete a minor in theatre arts by 
taking 18 credit hours in the theatre program. Three 
major productions are mounted each year by the 
department, with opportunities for students in perfor- 
mance, directing and backstage work. 

Required Courses 

T 131 Introduction to the Theatre 

T 132 Theatrical Style 

T 241 Early World Drama and Theatre 

T 242 Modern World Drama and Theatre 

Plus 6 additional credit hours in theatre arts, 



chosen from: T 341 Acting, T 342 Play 
Directing, T 491 Production Practicum I, 
T 492 Production Practicum II, T 599 
Independent Study. 

Music 

Coordinator: Michael G. Kaloyanides, Ph.D. 

Music courses may be used to satisfy the art core 
requirements. 

The program in music is unique. Music is studied 
as a world-wide phenomenon, not simply defined in 
the western European art tradition. Students are 
encouraged to view music as a creation of all cultures 
and civilizations on both the folk and art levels, 
including our own urban and ethnic subcultures. Ex- 
posure to various music should lead students to spe- 
cialization in a particular area as upperclasspersons. 

Since music is a performing art, students are expect- 
ed to reach a satisfactory level of proficiency in either a 
traditional western instrument or one central to the par- 
ticular culture in which they choose to specialize. 

A degree in music qualifies students for professions 
as performers, composers, music publishers, critics and 
journalists, teachers, curators and librarians. Combin- 
ing music with other fields, graduates may enter the 
fields of concert and ensemble management and 
sound engineering areas. There are, of course, count- 
less performance opportunities for instrumentalists, 
vocalists and composers. Vocations such as music pub- 
lishing, recording sales and promotions, and music 
criticism and journalism are also available to graduates 
with a degree in music. Students may also pursue 
careers in music education, not only as teachers in 
schools and conservatories but also as curators and 
librarians. 

Performance/Practice and 
Recording Facilities 

In addition to traditional performance and practice 
rooms, the following special areas have been equipped 
for the use of students enrolled in the music industry 
and sound recording programs. 



90 



Studio A 

The advanced recording technology classes take 
place in our largest recording facility, which was 
designed to excel as both a teaching and professional 
recording environment. The control room design 
offers comfortable seating for the students as well as 
providing an excellent view of the console and the rest 
of the equipment. Equipment includes a 24-track ana- 
log and two 8-track digital recorders for a total of 40 
tracks; a 40-input/32 monitor console for a total of 72 
inputs in mix mode; a Windows computer with a dig- 
ital audio card, MIDI interface and CD recording 
capabilities; an extensive selection of outboard (signal 
processing) equipment; and MIDI gear, including syn- 
thesizer, drum machine and a sampler. 

Studio B 

Multitrack recording and MIDI classes take place 
in a second recording facility with a l6-input/l6 mon- 
itor console, a digital multitrack recorder, a computer 
with digital audio and MIDI sequencing capabilities , 
assorted signal processing equipment, and MIDI syn- 
thesizer and drum machine. 

Studio C 

Our new digital mixing facility contains two digital 
multitrack recorders, a digital mixing board, a com- 
puter with digital audio and CD recording capabili- 
ties, signal processing gear and a DAT tape machine. 

Workstations 

Smaller recording/mixing stations include 4-track tape 
recorders/mixers, synthesizers and outboard (signal 
processing) equipment. 

B.A., Music 

The bachelor of arts in music is a dynamic program 
for the study of music within a liberal arts curriculum. 
It is distinctive in its treatment of music as a world- 
wide phenomenon. It is also flexible, allowing students 
to focus on performance or musicology. 

Students focusing on performance are urged to take 
private instruction on an instrument or in voice each 
semester of enrollment. Seniors must present either a 



senior thesis or a senior recital to qualify for gradua- 
tion. There are options in the senior year curriculum 
for courses appropriate for thesis or recital preparation. 

All students majoring in the B.A. in music pro- 
grams must complete 121-122 credit hours. 

Required Courses 

These courses must include the core requirements of 
the university plus the following music courses: 

MU 1 1 1 Introduction to Music 

MU 1 12 Introduction to World Music 

MU 116 Performance (12 credit hours minimum) 

MU 125-126 Elementary Music Theory with 

Laboratory (if required) 
MU 1 50-1 5 1 Introduction to Music Theory I and II 
MU 175-176 Musicianship I and II 
MU 201-202 Analysis and History of European Art 

Music I and II 
MU 501 Seminar in Advanced Research I, or 

MU 416 Advanced Performance 
MU 502 Seminar in Advanced Research II, or 

MU 416 Advanced Performance 

Plus music electives (6 credit hours) 
Plus one literature elective 
Plus eleven electives 

B.A., Music Industry 

The music industry program is offered to anyone 
interested in an exciting career in the fields of music 
management, arts administration, record production, 
promotion and sales, marketing, artist management, 
music publishing and any other areas in the entertain- 
ment industry. 

The program provides a unique balance of courses 
in the areas of music, sound recording and business as 
well as music industry. The music courses include such 
topics as music theory, musicianship, music history 
and performance. The sound recording courses 
include multitrack recording, digital audio and the use 
of computers in the recording studio. The business 
courses cover areas such as accounting, management 
and marketing. 

The music industry courses, specifically designed 
for this program, cover topics such as record compa- 



Arts &C Sciences 91 



nies, contracts, music marketing and merchandising, 
recording studio management, music publishing, 
copyright law and concert planning, promotion and 
management. Special emphasis will be given to career 
planning and development. 

y 

Required Courses 

These courses must include university core require 
ments plus the courses listed below: 

MU 1 1 1 Introduction to Music, or MU 1 12 

Introduction to World Music 

MU 125-126 Elementary Music Theory with 
Laboratory (if required) 

MU 150-151 Introduction to Music Theory I and II 

Plus the following: 

MU 116 Performance 

MU 175-176 Musicianship I and II, or MU 201-202 

Analysis and History of European Art 

Music I and II 
MU211 History of Rock 

MU261 Introduction to the Music Industry 

MU301 Recording Fundamentals 

MU 3 1 1 Multitrack Recording I 

MU312 Multitrack Recording II orMV 321 

Sound Synthesis/MIDI 
MU361 Production, Promotion and 

Distribution 
MU 362 Legal Issues, Copyrights and Contracts 

MU 46 1-462 Internship in the Music Industry 

I and II 

Plus music electives (6 credits) 

A 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting 

A 102 Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

MG 115 Fundamentals of Management 

MK 300 Principles of Marketing 

Plus business electives (6 credits) 
Plus five electives 

B.A., Music and Sound Recording 

The bachelor of arts in music and sound record- 
ing is a unique lour-year degree program. Its devel- 
opment is based on the philosophy that musicians 
should have a working knowledge of the media 
through which their art is most often heard and that 



sound recordists should have a working knowledge 
of the art form they are recording. Thus, it is 
designed to instruct students in three interrelated 
areas: 1) music history, theory and aesthetics; 2) 
musicianship; and 3) sound recording methodology 
and technique. Coursework includes 38 credits in 
arts and sciences, 36 credits in music, 15 credits in 
recording and 34 credits in restricted and free elec- 
tives for a total of 123. 

Required Courses 

These courses must include the university core 
requirements plus the courses in the following list: 

MU 1 1 1 Introduction to Music 

MU 112 Introduction to World Music 

MU 116 Performance (6 credit hours 

minimum) 
MU 125-126 Elementary Music Theory with 

Laboratory (if required) 
MU 1 50-1 5 1 Introduction to Music Theory I and II 
MU 175-176 Musicianship I and II 
MU 201-202 Analysis and History of European Art 

Music I and II 
MU 211 History of Rock 

MU 221 Film Music 

MU 301 Recording Fundamentals 

MU 311-312 Multitrack Recording I and II 
MU 321 Sound Synthesis/MIDI 

MU 401-402 Recording Seminar/ Project I and II 
PH 100 Introductory Physics with Laboratory 

PH 203 The Physics of Music and Sound 

with Laboratory 

B.S., Music and Sound Recording 

The bachelor of science in music and sound 
recording is similar to the bachelor oi arts program 
in its philosophy and design but provides a stronger 
background in the science and technology of record- 
ing through classes in calculus, physics and electrical 
engineering. Coursework includes 47 credits in arts 
and sciences, 36 credits in music, 15 credits in 
recording, six credits in electrical engineering and 19 
credits in restricted and free electives for a total of 
123 credits. 



92 



Required Courses 

These courses must include university core 
requirements plus the following courses : 

MU 1 1 1 Introduction to Music 

MU 112 Introduction to World Music 

MU 116 Performance (6 credit hours minimum) 

MU 125-126 Elementary Music Theory with 

Laboratory (if required) 
MU 150-151 Introduction to Music Theory I and II 
MU 175-176 Musicianship I and II 
MU 201-202 Analysis and History of European Art 

Music I and II 
MU 211 History of Rock 

MU 221 Film Music 

MU 301 Recording Fundamentals 

MU 311-312 Multitrack Recording I and II 
MU 321 Sound Synthesis/MIDI 

MU 401-402 Recording Seminar/Project I and II 

Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

Principles of Electrical Engineering 

Calculus I and II 

Mechanics, Heat, Waves 

with Laboratory 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 

with Laboratory 

Minor in Music 

A total of 18 credit hours in music courses other 
than performance are required for the minor in music. 
A student's program should be planned in consultation 
with a member of the music faculty. 



EE 


201 


EE 


212 


M 


117-118 


PH 


150 



Business 93 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



Zeljan Schuster, Ph.D., Interim Dean 

The primary mission of the School of Business of 
the University of New Haven is to provide quaHry, 
career-oriented education to students with varied eco- 
nomic and cukural backgrounds, experiences and aca- 
demic preparation. We seek to accompHsh this through 
comprehensive programs designed to accommodate a 
full-time undergraduate and a substantial part-time 
evening student body, and by engaging in teaching, 
research and consulting involving both the develop- 
ment and communication of knowledge. It is the vision 
of the school to be a regional leader in providing career- 
oriented, contemporary business education. 

As the business environment becomes more com- 
plex, the School of Business provides contemporary 
educational experiences of high quality in order to pre- 
pare students who are ready to face the challenges of a 
dynamic, modern world and to meet their responsibil- 
ities within a global society. To meet this goal, career- 
oriented programs are provided, employing current 
knowledge and techniques presented in a manner 
appropriate to the diverse backgrounds and experi- 
ences of students. 

An interactive curriculum is designed to provide 
students with the tools to pursue a wide variety of pro- 
fessional, educational and intellectual activities. In 
addition to full-time students, many men and women 
who are enrolled are at the same time employed in var- 
ious public and private organizations and are working 
toward their degrees on a part-time basis. This diver- 
sity creates a unique learning environment. 



Programs 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Management of Sports Industries 
Business Economics 
Communication 



Finance 

International Business 
Management of Sports Industries 
Marketing and Electronic Commerce 

Associate in Science 

Business Administration 
Communication 

Certificates 

Journalism 

Mass Communication 

Graduate Programs 

Doctor of Science/Management Systems 

(Sc.D., being phased out) 
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) 
Master of Business Administration for 

Executives (E. M.B.A.) 
Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) 
Master of Science (M.S.) 

Accounting (being phased out) 

Finance and Financial Services (being phased out) 

Health Care Administration 

Labor Relations 

Taxation (being phased out) 

Dual Degrees 

M.B.A./M.S. Industrial Engineering 
M.B.A./M.P.A. 

Graduate Certificates 

(See Graduate Catalog) 

General Policies in the 
School of Business 

• Each student will be assigned an academic adviser. 

• A student may select a business major after consul- 
tation with the appropriate adviser. 



94 



• A student may select a minor after consultation 
with the adviser or the appropriate chair. 

• No coordinated course credit or transfer credit will 
be accepted from two-year colleges for UNH jun- 
iors or seniors. Only 30 business credits may be 
transferred; generally, upper-level business courses 
will not be acceptable as transfer credits. 

• To receive a degree from the School of Business, 
the final 30 credits must be earned at the 
University of New Haven. 

• A minimum of 121 semester hours is required 
for graduation. 

• All students enrolled in upper-level courses (desig- 
nated as 300 or higher) must have junior standing 
and must have completed all prerequisites. There is 
one exception: Upper-level communication (CO) 
courses may be taken prior to the junior year. 

Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to business programs 
must be a graduate of an approved secondary school or 
the equivalent. While no set program of high school 
subjects is prescribed, an applicant must satisfy all of 
UNH's admissions criteria, including the standard of 
the university with respect to the high school average. 
Applicants must present 15 acceptable units of satis- 
factory work, including nine or more units of college 
preparatory subjects. Satisfactory scores on College 
Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Tests 
(SAT) or American College Testing (ACT) program 
tests are required. See the Admission section in the 
beginning of this catalog. 

University Core Curriculum 

In addition to departmental requirements, students 
must fulfill all requirements of the university core cur- 
riculum. See the University Curricula section of this 
catalog for the list of requirements. It should be noted 
that, whenever possible, liberal arts and lower division 
requirements should be completed by the end of the 
sophomore year. 

Common Courses for Business Programs 

Students earning bachelor's degrees in School of 



Business programs must complete the basic business 
curriculum shown below, as well as the university core 
requirements and the course requirements for their 
chosen major. 

Required Courses 

(For all majors except communication) 

A 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting 

A 102 Introduction to Managerial 

Accounting 

BA 100 Leadership in the Business Community 

CO 100 Human Communication 

LA 101 Business Law and the Regulatory 

Environment 

QA 118 Business Mathematics 

EC 133-134 Principles of Economics I and II 

EC 200 Global Economy* 

QA 216 Probability and Statistics 

QA 217 Advanced Statistics* 

FI 313 Business Finance* 

MG 310 Management and Organization* 

MK 300 Principles of Marketing* 

MG 550 Business Policy* 

* Not required in the A.S., Business Administration. 

Minors 

It is highly recommended that students working 
toward a degree in one area of study give serious 
thought to organizing their elective courses so as to re- 
ceive a minor in a second discipline. A minor usually 
consists of 18 credit hours devoted to the study of 
either a group of courses on related subjects or a series 
of courses offered by one department. 

Students interested in studying for a minor should 
consult with the chair of the department offering the 
minor. The minors available in the School of Business are: 

Accounting 

Business Administration (for nonbusiness majors) 

Communication 

Economics 

Entrepreneurship (for business majors) 

Finance 

International Business 

Marketing 

Operations Management and Quantitative Analysis 



Business 95 



Department of Accounting 

Chair: Robert E. Wnek, J.D., LL.M., CPA 

Professors: Stephen A. Moscove, Ph.D., Oklahoma 
State University; Robert E. Wnek, LL.M., Boston 
University School of Law, CPA 

Associate Professors: Richard G. Brody, Ph.D., 
Arizona State University; Robert McDonald, 
M.B.A., New York University, CMA, CPA, CIA, 
CFA; Michael J. Rolleri, M.B.A., University of 
Connecticut, CPA 

Assistant Professors: Alireza Daneshfar, Ph.D., 
Concordia University; Scott G. Lane, Ph.D., 
University of Kentucky 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Martin A. Goldberg, 
L.L.M., New York University 

The accounting department is responsible for 
courses in accounting, business law and taxation. 
While the study of accounting has its roots in eco- 
nomic theory, the courses emphasize practical appli- 
cation to real world problems. 

The study of accounting emphasizes the economic 
decision making process as well as the principles and 
procedures used to produce the information required by 
decision makers. Accounting promotes an appreciation 
for not only the nature of accounting information but 
also the use of that information in the complex process 
of decision making by individuals, business firms and 
government. The department of accounting at the 
University of New Haven seeks to serve the educational 
needs of those involved in all areas of accounting-pub- 
lic, private or governmental. 

There are many career opportunities for students in 
the business world, government and academia. Account- 
ing professionals are needed by consulting firms, public 
accounting firms and private industry as well as by fed- 
eral, state and local governments. Because of the practi- 
cal orientation, future business entrepreneurs can benefit 
by the background obtained in the program. 

The accounting department at the University of New 
Haven offers courses at the bachelor's and masters level 
for the study of accounting. In addition, an educational 
opportunity is available to students who desire to meet 
the 1 50-credit-hour educational requirements necessary 



to take the Certified Public Accounting (CPA) Examina- 
tion. These additional educational requirements may be 
taken at the graduate level leading to an M.B.A. degree. 

Accounting students may select electives from 
other disciplines such as computer science, economics 
and finance. 

On the graduate level, a concentration in accounting 
is available to students enrolled in the master of business 
administration program. Graduate certificates are 
offered in accounting and taxation. Complete informa- 
tion is available in the Graduate School catalog. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative edu- 
cation program (Co-op) which enables students to com- 
bine their education with practical, paid work experience 
in their career field. For further details see "The Co-op 
Program" which appears earlier in the catalog or contact 
the Co-op coordinator for the School of Business. 

B.S., Accounting 

The accounting major is selected by those students 
wishing to pursue a career in management accounting, 
or in public accounting leading to the certified public 
accounting (CPA) license. The integration of business 
law, taxation and finance into the program provides 
the student with the necessary academic background 
to meet the challenges of the accounting profession. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in accounting are required 
to complete 121 credits including the university core 
curriculum, common courses for business majors and 
the courses listed below: 

A 220 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 

A 221 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 

A 222 Intermediate Financial Accounting III 

A 223 Cost Accounting I 

A 331 Advanced Financial Accounting I 

A 333 Auditing and Reporting Principles 

A 335 Federal Income Taxation I 

A 336 Federal Income Taxation II 

A 350 Accounting Information Systems 

LA 101 Business Law and he Regulatory Environment 

LA 1 12 Accounting Business Law 



96 



Plus rwo business electives 
Plus three non-business electives 

A 101-102 are the prerequisites for advanced ac- 
counting courses. 

Minor in Accounting 

Requirements for the accounting minor include a 
total of 18 semester hours. Students must complete 
the following courses: 

A 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting 

A 102 Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

A 220-221 Intermediate Financial Accounting I & II 

Plus two additional accounting courses with consent 
of the undergraduate accounting coordinator. 

Department of 
Communication 

Chainjerry L. Allen, Ph.D. 

Professors:Jerry L. Allen, Ph.D., Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale; Marilou McLaughlin, 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Steven A. 
Raucher, Ph.D., Wayne State University; 
Donald C. Smith, Ph.D., University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst 

Instructors: W Vincent Burke, M.Ed., Springfield 
College; Paul C. Falcone, M.B.A., University 
of New Haven 

Students develop a comprehensive understanding 
of communication from interpersonal to mass com- 
munication while majoring in organizational commu- 
nication, public relations, advertising or mass commu- 
nication (journalism, radio, television, film). This pro- 
gram blends theoretical concepts and skills, academic 
rigor and hands-on experience to prepare students for 
careers in business, the public sector or the media-or 
for graduate study. 

An active internship is a valuable complement to 
students' classroom studies. The department has 
internship contacts with regional and national busi- 
nesses, public service organizations, and print and 
electronic media. Communication majors can gain 
additional experience through writing for The Charger 



Bulletin (the student newspaper), being on the staff at 
WNHU-FM (the campus radio station), doing pro- 
gramming for local television, and producing special- 
ized film and video programs. 

Some faculty members have received national and 
international recognition; and all faculty members do 
research, publishing and have practical experience in 
their communication specialties. Faculty and some 
students belong to such professional organizations as 
the International Communication Association; the 
Public Relations Society of America; the Eastern 
Communication Association; the National 
Association of College Broadcasters; the National 
Academy of Television Arts and Sciences; the National 
Academy of Cable Programming; the National 
Federation of Local Cable Programming; the 
American Film Institute; the Broadcast Educators' 
Association; the National Communication 
Association; the Association for Educational 
Journalism and Mass Communication; the 
Organization for the Study of Communication, 
Language, and Gender; The World Communication 
Association; and the International Listening 
Association. 

Faculty in the department have served as editor 
and/or associate editors of more than a half dozen of the 
top-tier scholarly journals in the communication field. 

In the interest of maximizing students' communica- 
tion experiences as well as encouraging professional con- 
tacts and advancement, the department encourages stu- 
dents to enter regional and national competitions in 
public relations, advertising, radio, television and film. 



Lambda Pi Eta 

The department sponsors the Beta Kappa Chapter 
of Lambda Pi Eta, the national communication honor 
society. To receive honorary membership in this pres- 
tigious organization, students must have at least 45 
university credits and at least nine credits in commu- 
nication courses. They must have a 3.0 cumulative 
average and a 3.25 GPA in communication courses. 
Members become part of a national network of com- 
munication majors and may showcase their work at 
regional and national conferences. 



Business 97 



The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative edu- 
cation program (Co-op) which enables students to com- 
bine their education with practical, paid work experience 
in their career field. For further details see "The Co-op 
Program" which appears earlier in the catalog or contact 
the Co-op coordinator for the School of Business. 

B.S., Communication 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in communication must 
complete 121 credit hours, including the university 
core requirements. Communication majors will take: 

CO 100 Human Communication 

CO 101 Fundamentals of Mass Communication 

CO 102 Writing for the Media 

CO 114 Production Fundamentals 

CO 205 Intercultural Communication 

CO 212 Television Production I 

CO 214 Elements of Film 

CO 220 Film Production, or 

CO 203 Radio Production 

CO 300 Persuasive Communication 

CO 301 Communication Theory and Research 

CO 302 Social Impact of Media 

CO 314 Television Production II 

CO 420 Communication and the Law 

CO 500 Seminar in Communication Studies 

Plus a series ofelectives in the following areas: 

Advertising 

Organizational Communication 
Mass Communication 
Public Relations 

These elective courses are designed for students 
with a wide range of interests. Such students may envi- 
sion becoming communication consultants, television 
camera operators, broadcasters, journalists, producers 
of documentary films, business managers, lawyers, 
politicians, informed citizens or researchers investigat- 
ing the effects of communication on society and why 
people say what they say. It is the department's objec- 
tive to assist students in the pursuit of these goals by 
providing them with a sound academic background. 



B.A., Communication 

For information on the B.A. in communication, see 
the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. 

A.S., Communication 

Upon successful completion of the first two years of 
the four-year bachelor of science program in commu- 
nication, students may petition to receive an associate 
in science degree with a major in communication. 
Students should consult with an adviser for specific 
information. 

Minor in Communication 

A total of 18 semester hours of communication 
course credits must be earned in order for a student to 
declare the area of study as a completed minor. This 
work must include CO 100 Human Communication. 
The balance of the minor program is worked out in 
individual conference with the student and the com- 
munication department adviser. 

Communication Certificates 

The communication department offers certificates in 
journalism and mass communication. Students must 
complete 15 credit hours to earn a certificate. Students 
may choose to take these courses on a matriculated or 
nonmatriculated basis. For those students who choose 
the nonmatriculated option, it is not necessary to apply 
for admission to a degree program at the university. 
However, if you are admitted, the credits earned may be 
applied toward the requirements for a degree program. 

Mass Communication Certificate 

This program offers options in television produc- 
tion, radio production, writing for media, interper- 
sonal communication or a combination of radio/tele- 
vision and film. All students are required to take 15 
credit hours, including the following: 

CO 100 Human Communication 
CO 114 Production Fundamentals 

Plus three other courses selected in consultation 
with an adviser. 



98 



Journalism Certificate 

For more information on journalism certificate 
requirements, please refer to the College of Arts and 
Sciences section under the communication programs. 

Graduate Studies 

The communication department offers a graduate 
concentration and certificate. Please consult the 
Graduate School catalog for more information. 

Department of 
Economics and Finance 

Chair: Steven J. Shapiro, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: Ward Theilman, Ph.D., 
University of Illinois 

Professors: Peter I. Berman, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University; Phillip Kaplan, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University; Joseph A. Parker, Ph.D., University 
of Oklahoma; Robert M. Rainish, Ph.D., 
City University of New York; 

Associate Professors: Edward A. Downe, Ph.D., 
New School for Social Research; John J. Phelan, 
Ph.D., George Washington University; Armando 
Rodriguez, Ph.D., University of Texas; Steven J. 
Shapiro, Ph.D., Georgetown University; Zeljan 
Schuster, Ph.D., University of Belgrade; Kamal 
Upadhyaya, Ph.D., Auburn University 

Assistant Professors: Wentworth Boynton, Ph.D., 
University of Rhode Island; Sanja Grubacic, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut; George M. Pushner, 
Ph.D., Columbia University, CFP; Sean Reid, 
M.B.A., Incarnate Word College; Mehmet 
Sencicek, B.S.B.A., University of Nevada-Reno 

Economics courses provide a basis for an understand- 
ing of economic structures, a wide range of domestic 
and international issues and trends in the economic life 
of modern societies. These courses offer training in 
analysis of economic problems as an aid to the evalua- 
tion of economic policies. 

Introductory courses are designed to provide the 



foundation of economic knowledge which every citizen 
in a modern complex society should have so they may 
understand the decisions of individual economic units 
and the operation of a national economy as a whole. 

Advanced courses are designed primarily for eco- 
nomics and business majors. They cover, in depth, spe- 
cific economic topics. They also prepare students for 
economic research and management positions in 
financial institutions, individual organizations, gov- 
ernment, or graduate study and teaching. 

The department of economics has two major objec- 
tives: to function as a service department for other 
departments in the School of Business and other 
schools of the university, and to offer a specialized edu- 
cation to students majoring in business economics. 

Students majoring in economics may choose either 
a bachelor of science in business economics or a bach- 
elor of arts in economics. 

Finance, as an area of study, is designed to promote 
an analytic appreciation of the financial system and 
the financial decision-making process in which socie- 
ty — through its individuals, business firms and gov- 
ernments — is continually engaged. 

In particular, the study of finance provides a struc- 
tured analysis of the financial system and the finan- 
cial decision-making process as determinants of the 
economic wealth of the individual, the business firm 
and the nation. The study of finance enables the stu- 
dent to pursue the preparation required for a number 
of financial decision-making positions in government 
and industry, including the entire variety of financial 
institutions. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in the cat- 
alog or contact the Co-op coordinator for the School 
of Business. 

B.S., Business Economics 

The program in business economics is designed to 



Business 99 



prepare students for research or executive positions in 
business or government. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in business economics must 
complete 121 credit hours including the university 
core curriculum, the common courses for business 
majors and the following: 

EC 340 Microeconomic Analysis 
EC 341 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Plus five advanced courses in economics. 
Plus three business electives 
Plus four non-business electives 

B.S., Finance 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in finance must complete 
121 credit hours, including the university core cur- 
riculum, the common courses for business majors and 
the following: 

A 220 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 
FI 329 Corporate Financial Management 
FI 330 Investment Analysis and Management 

Plus three of the following: 

A 221 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 

EC 340 Microeconomic Analysis 

EC 341 Macroeconomic Analysis 

FI 314 Principles of Real Estate 

FI 325 International Finance 

FI 327 Risk and Insurance 

FI 341 Financial Decision Making 

FI 345 Financial Institutions and Markets 

Plus two business electives 
Plus five non-business elective 

Minor in Economics 

Eighteen credit hours of economics courses are 
required for a minor including: 

EC 133-134 Principles of Economics I and II 

Plus four other advanced courses in economics 



Minor in Finance 

Requirements for the finance minor include a total 
of 12 semester hours beyond the prerequisites. 
Students must complete the following courses: 

FI 3 1 3 Business Finance 

Plus three other finance courses selected in consulta- 
tion with a finance adviser. 



Department of 
Management 



Chair: Abbas Nadim, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: Lynn W. Ellis, D.P.S., 
Pace University 

Professors: Abbas Nadim, Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; Allen Sack, Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University 

Visiting Professor: Leon B. Anziano, M.S., Cornell 
University; Executive Management Program, 
University of Michigan 

Associate Professors: Ronald Dick, Ed.D., Temple 
University; Gil B. Fried, J.D., Ohio State 
University; Pawel Mensz, Ph.D., Systems Research 
Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences; Judith 
Neal, Ph.D., Yale University; Anshuman Prasad, 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Assistant Professors: Dale M. Finn, Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts; Deborah Litvin, 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts at Amherst; 
Robert Metchick, Ph.D., Rensselear Polytechnic 
Institute; Parbudyal Singh, Ph.D., McMaster 
University 

At this time in history, when all of society's sys- 
tems—governmental, technologic, societal, educational, 
industrial and military as well as business-are becom- 
ing more sophisticated and complex, the need for 
skilled managers has never been greater. Today's man- 
agers must direct their attention to global competition, 
delivery of quality products and services, and managing 
the interaction with their internal and external environ- 
ments. The management programs at UNH seek to 



100 



provide students with the foundations of knowledge 
and skill necessary for moving to positions of responsi- 
bility in management. The study of theories and meth- 
ods of analyzing decisions will prepare students for 
entry-level jobs as well as sharpen the skills of those 
already holding organizational positions. The underly- 
ing concept is to combine adequate specialization with 
the integrative point of view required of the manager. 

The department of management offers degree pro- 
grams in the following areas: associate in science 
degree program in business administration and bache- 
lor of science degree programs in business administra- 
tion and management of sports industries, along with 
minors in business administration, management and 
entrepreneurship. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative edu- 
cation program (Co-op) which enables students to com- 
bine their education with practical, paid work experience 
in their career field. For further details see "The Co-op 
Program" which appears earlier in the catalog or contact 
the Co-op coordinator for the School of Business. 

B.S., Business Administration 

In order to function effectively in a variety of man- 
agement situations, administrators should be conver- 
sant with all major areas of management. Moreover, 
they should have a thorough understanding of the 
interrelationships which exist among the various func- 
tional groups within organizations. This point of view 
is essential for managers who are to participate effec- 
tively with others in the administrative group and who 
are to administer activities in their areas of responsi- 
bility in the best interest of the entire organization. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in business administra- 
tion must complete 121 credit hours including the 
university core curriculum, the common courses for 
business majors and the following courses: 

IB 413 International Marketing 

MG 331 Management of Human Resources 

MG 350 Management of Workforce Diversity 

MG 455 Total Quality Management 



MG 512 Contemporary Issues in Business 

and Society 
MG 515 Management Seminar 

Plus five business electives 
Plus three non-business electives 

Concentration in Management 
of Sports Industries 

Within the B.S. in business administration pro- 
gram, a concentration in management of sports indus- 
tries is available to meet the special interests of some 
students. Students taking the B.S. in business admin- 
istration with this concentration complete 121 credits 
including the university core curriculum, the common 
courses taken by all business majors and the courses 
listed below: 

IB 413 International Marketing 

MG 120 Development of American Sports 

MG 330 Management of Sports Industries 

MG 331 Management of Human Resources 

MG 335 Public Relations in Sports 

MG 350 Management of Workforce Diversity 

MG 425 Sports Industries and the Law 

MG 455 Total Quality Management 

MG 512 Contemporary Issues in Business 

and Society 

MG 515 Management Seminar 

Plus one business elective 
Plus four non-business electives 

B.S., Management of Sports Industries 

The sports industry is one of the fastest growing seg- 
ments of our economy. As the industry expands, so does 
the need for sports management specialists trained in 
business management skills and sensitive to the unique 
features of the sports enterprise. College graduates in 
sports management can pursue careers in professional 
sport franchises, coliseum and arena management, ski 
resorts, corporate fitness centers, college sport programs, 
sports media industries, sporting goods merchandising 
and a wide variety of other sport-related areas. 

Students earning the B.S. in management of sports 
industries complete 121 credits including the universi- 
ty core curriculum, the common courses taken by all 



Business 101 



business majors and the specialized courses listed 
below: 

MG 120 Development of American Sports 

MG 330 Management of Sports Industries 

MG 331 Management of Human Resources 

MG 335 Public Relations in Sports 

MG 350 Management of Workforce Diversity 

MG 420 Sports Facility Management 

MG 425 Sports Industries and the Law 

MG 512 Contemporary Issues in Business 

and Society 

MG 597 Practicum 

Plus two business electives 
Plus four non-business electives 

A.S., Business Administration 

Students earning the A.S. in business administra- 
tion must complete 61 credit hours including those 
courses listed below: 



A 101 

A 102 

BA 100 

CO 100 

CS 107 

EC 133-134 

LA 101 

M 127 
MG 115 
QA 118 
QA 216 



Introduction to Financial Accounting 
Introduction to ManagerialAccounting 
Leadership in the Business Community 
Human Communication 
Introduction to Data Processing 
Principles of Economics I and II 
Business Law and the 
Regulatory Environment 
Finite Mathematics 
Fundamentals of Management 
Business Mathematics 
Probability and Statistics 



Minor in Business Administration 
(For Nonbusiness Majors) 

A total of 18 semester hours of business course 
credits must be earned in order for a student to declare 
the field as a completed minor area of study. The 
minor in business administration is open to nonbusi- 
ness majors. The courses required for a minor in busi- 
ness administration are: 

A 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting 
BA 100 Leadership in the Business Community 
EC 133 Principles of Economics I, or 

EC 134 Principles of Economics II 



LA 101 Business Law and the Regulatory 

Environment 
MG 115 Fundamentals of Management 
MK 300 Principles of Marketing 

Minor in Entrepreneurship 

(for Business Majors) 

The United States is comprised of two econo- 
mies-big business and small business. Virtually all 
businesses begin as a small business initiated by an 
entrepreneur with an idea or vision. Ninety-five per- 
cent of all businesses in the United States are small 
businesses. Entrepreneurship and small business are 
dynamic and powerful interactive forces in these 
increasingly difficult economic times. 

The University of New Haven offers a minor in 
entrepreneurship as a means of preparing students 
who plan to start a business, wish to purchase an exist- 
ing business or expect to join the family business afiier 
graduation. In addition, this minor may also provide 
an intrapreneurship foundation for students who 
aspire to work in big business. 

This minor is a multidisciplinary approach to 
entrepreneurship that integrates the business disci- 
plines with communication, negotiation and presenta- 
tion skills. Furthermore, the program links theory and 
practice by tying together the best academic develop- 
ments with the most effective business approaches. 

A total of 15 semester hours of business course 
credits must be earned in order for a student to declare 
the field as a completed minor area of study. The 
courses required for a minor in entrepreneurship are 
listed below: 

MG 317 Entrepreneurship and New 

Business Development 
MG 327 Business Planning 
MG 417 Managing an Entrepreneurial Venture* 
MG 517 Practical Field Studies 

Plus one of the following electives: 

FI 371 Structuring and Financing a New Business 
MG 457 Family Business Management 
MG 467 Franchising 

* Students in entrepreneurship minor will take 
MG 417 in place ofMG 455. 



102 



Department of Marketing 
and International Business 

Chair: Ben B. Judd, Jr., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritis: Robert P. Brody, D.B.A. 
Harvard University 

Professors: George T. Haley, Ph.D., University 
of Texas at Austin; Ben B. Judd, Jr., Ph.D., 
University of Texas at Arhngton; Michael Kublin, 
Ph.D., New York University; David J. Morris, Jr., 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Associate Professor: Cheng Lu Wang, Ph.D., 
Oklahoma State University 

Assistant Professor: Subroto Roy, Ph.D., 
University of Western Sydney 

The disciplines of marketing and international 
business investigate business practices and strategies 
needed to attract customers and compete effectively in 
a free market system. Business is global. Therefore, 
both disciplines examine markets and competition 
from a global perspective. However, marketing places 
a greater emphasis on practices and strategies in the 
domestic environment, while international business 
focuses more on multinational issues. Both programs 
have recently added coverage of the emerging impact 
of e-commerce on business practices. 

The sequence of courses in both programs include 
five required and two elective courses which culminate 
in an integrative capstone course. Students wishing to 
pursue internships are encouraged to use that experi- 
ence as one of their electives. Normally, internships are 
scheduled during the senior year. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
'The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in the cat- 
alog or contact the Co-op coordinator for the School 
of Business. 



B.S., Marketing and Electronic Commerce 

Marketing is the study of the processes for develop- 
ing and distributing goods and services attractive to 
selected customer groups. These markets may include 
both consumer and organizational (industrial, govern- 
mental, or non-profit) groups. Understanding of these 
customers results from studies of psychological and 
sociological perspectives and from the use of research 
tools. Based on these understandings, competitive 
strategies and distribution channels can be devised to 
reach the desired customers more effectively. The 
emergence of e-commerce has substantially modified 
some of the existing strategies for understanding the 
customer and for managing channels of distribution. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in marketing must com- 
plete 121 credit hours. These courses must include the 
university core curriculum, common courses for busi- 
ness majors and the five courses and two electives list- 
ed below: 

MK 302 Organizational Marketing 
MK 305 Consumer Behavior 
MK 326 Overview of E-Commerce 
MK 442 Marketing Research in the 

Global Environment 
MK 515 Marketing Management 

Plus two of the following: 

IB 413 International Marketing 

MK 307 Advertising and Promotion 

MK 316 Sales Management 

MK 321 Retail Management 

MK 327 E-Commerce Consumer Applications 

MK 402 Marketing of Services 

MK 450 Special Topics 

MK 598 Internship 

MM 301 Introduction to Multimedia 

Plus one business elective 
Plus five non-business electives 
Plus one elective 

Transfer students with transfer credits in marketing 
major courses below the junior level must validate 
these credits by either passing a challenge examination 
or passing another major course at a higher level. 



Business 103 



B.S., International Business 

The study of international business is designed to 
prepare students for careers dealing with international 
trade at domestic and multinational corporations. 
Courses include coverage of international economic 
issues, research techniques, cross-cultural perspectives 
and political issues. In addition to the required and 
elective courses specific to the major, students are 
encouraged to use as many as possible of their general 
electives for coverage of history and political science 
relevant to international trade. 

Required Courses 

Students earning a B.S. in international business 
must complete 121 credit hours. These courses must 
include the university core curriculum, common 
courses for business majors and the five courses and 
two electives listed below: 

CO 205 Intercultural Communication 

FI 325 International Finance 

IB 413 International Marketing 

MK 442 Marketing Research in the Global 

Environment 
IB 549 Global Business Strategy 

Plus two of the following: 

EC 342 International Economics 

260 Modern Asia 

262 Modern Chinese History 

264 Modern Japanese History 

351 Russia and the Soviet Union 

446 Europe in the Twentieth Century 

421 Operation of the Multinational Corporation 

422 International Business Negotiations 
450 Special Topics 
598 Internship 

MK 326 Overview of E-Commerce 

PS 241 International Relations 

243 International Law and Organization 

281 Comparative Political Systems: Asia 

282 Comparative Political Systems: Europe 

283 Comparative Political Systems: 
Latin America 

285 Comparative Political Systems: Middle East 

Plus one business elective 

Plus three non-business electives 

Plus four electives 



HS 

HS 

HS 

HS 

HS 

IB 

IB 

IB 

IB 



PS 
PS 
PS 
PS 

PS 



Minor in Marketing 

(Nonbusiness Majors) 

Required Courses 

MK 300 Principles of Marketing 
MK 316 Sales Management 

Plus three of the following: 

MK 302 Organizational Marketing 

MK 305 Consumer Behavior 

MK 307 Advertising and Promotion 

MK 321 Retail Management 

MK 402 Marketing of Services 

MK 450 Special Topics 

MK 515 Marketing Management 

MK 598 Internship 

Minor in Marketing 

(Business Majors) 

Required Courses 

MK 300 Marketing 

Plus four of the following: 

MK 305 Consumer Behavior 

MK 307 Advertising and Promotion 

MK 316 Sales Management 

MK 402 Marketing of Services 

MK 442 Marketing Research in the 

Global Environment 

MK 450 Special Topics 

MK 515 Marketing Management 

Minor in International Business 
(Nonbusiness Majors) 

Required Courses 

EC 200 Global Economy 

MG 310 Management and Organization 

MK 300 Marketing 

Plus two of the following: 

CO 205 Intercultural Communication 

IB 413 International Marketing 

IB 421 Operation of the Multinational Corporation 



104 



Minor in International Business 

(Business Majors) 

CO 205 Intercultural Communication 

FI 325 International Finance 

IB 413 International Marketing 

IB 421 Operation of the Multinational Corporation 

Plus one 400- or 500-level IB course 

Department of 
Public Management 

Chair: Charles N. Coleman, M.P.A. 

Professor: Jack Werblow, Ph.D., University 
of Cincinnati 

Associate Professor: Cynthia Conrad, Ph.D., 
University of Texas 

Assistant Professor: Charles N. Coleman, M.P.A., 
West Virginia University 

Public administration is no longer an undergradu- 
ate major. Courses, however, are offered for criminal 
justice and other majors. 

Department of 
Quantitative Analysis 

Chair: William S.Y. Pan, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: Warren J. Smith, M.B.A., 
Northeastern University 

Professors: Linda R. Martin, Ph.D., University of 
South Carolina; William S.Y. Pan, Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Associate Professor: Pawel Mensz, Ph.D., Systems 
Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences 

Assistant Professor: Jiajuan Liang, Ph.D., 
Hong Kong Baptist University 



Minor in Operations Management 
and Quantitative Analysis 

The field of operations management is directly 
related to creation and delivery of the product in both 
service and manufacturing industries. The focus is on 
the operating end of the business where the resources 
(production capacity, human skills and raw materials) 
are transformed into goods and services. Since every 
organization — from banks to fire departments, retail 
stores, hospitals or manufacturing facilities — is built 
around its product(s), the need for related knowledge 
of operations management is unquestionable. 

As pressures for quality, time-based competition 
and a more integrated approach to management 
increase, a minor in operations management and 
quantitative analysis will expand options and increase 
marketability for business students. 

A total of 1 5 credit hours are required: 

QA 216 Probability and Statistics 
QA 2 1 7 Advanced Statistics 

Plus three of the following: 

A 23 Cost Accounting I 

MK 470 Marketing Channels 

QA 328 Quantitative Techniques in Management 

QA 350 Quantitative Techniques 

QA 380 Operations Management 

QA 428 Forecasting for Decision Making 

QA 480 Project Management 

QA 598 Internship 

QA 599 Independent Study 



Engineering & Applied Science 105 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
AND APPLIED SCIENCE 



Zulma R. Toro-Ramos, Ph.D., Dean 
Michael A. CoUura, Ph.D., Associate Dean 

Engineering and the applied sciences are dynamic 
professions that use knowledge, judgment and creativ- 
ity for solving some of the most important and inter- 
esting challenges of society. These challenges and the 
changing face of engineering will shape the world of 
the twenty-first century — a world of exotic materials, 
new sources of energy, staggering telecommunications 
and computing capabilities, cybernetic factories and 
needed public works. 

Few professions can match engineering for its chal- 
lenge and excitement, or for its essential spirit of play. 
This quality is true for each of the school's seven engi- 
neering programs-in chemical, civil, computer, 
electrical, general, industrial and mechanical engineer- 
ing-and also for its applied science programs in com- 
puter science and chemistry. The rewards of an engi- 
neering career include challenging tasks, social status, 
appealing working conditions and compensation. All 
of these are in addition to the great satisfaction of see- 
ing your accomplishments in the real world of engi- 
neered components and systems. 

The mission of the School of Engineering and 
Applied Science (SEAS) is to prepare individuals for 
professional practice in diverse engineering areas, com- 
puter science and chemistry. In addition, SEAS prepares 
individuals for life-long education in their professional 
careers, and for such formal post-baccalaureate educa- 
tion as their inclination and professional growth require. 

As part of this preparation, students will become 
proficient in: 

• the basic science, mathematics and engineering 
skills required in their chosen profession; 

• design and synthesis; 

• using and integrating computer technology in the 
practice of their profession; 



• considering the social, political, economic and 
safety concerns and practices of a diverse commu- 
nity in developing their professional solutions; 

• written, oral, graphical and multimedia 
communication; 

• working as a member of a team and leading a team; 

• considering legal and ethical issues related to 
their profession. 

The School of Engineering offers undergraduate 
programs leading to the bachelor of science degree and 
the associate in science degree. 

At the graduate level, the School of Engineering 
offers programs leading to the master of science 
degree and graduate certificates. Detailed informa- 
tion about these graduate programs is in the Gradu- 
ate School catalog. 

Professional Accreditation 

The curricula leading to the bachelor's degrees in 
chemical, civil, electrical, industrial and mechanical 
engineering are accredited by the Engineering 
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board 
for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET). 
The bachelor's degree program in computer science 
is fully accredited by the Computing Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (CAC/ABET). 

Programs 

Bachelor of Science 

Chemistry 

Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Engineering 
Computer Science 
Electrical Engineering 
General Engineering 



106 



Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

Associate in Science 

Chemistry 

Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Science 
Electrical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

Certificates 

Computer Programming 
Logistics 

Graduate Programs 
Master of Science 

Computer Science 
Electrical Engineering 
Environmental Engineering 
Executive Engineering Management 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Operations Research 

Dual Degree 

M.B.A./M.S. Industrial Engineering 

Graduate Certificates 

Civil Engineering Design 

Computer Applications 

Computer Programming 

Computing 

Logistics 

Quality Engineering 

Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to the SEAS programs 
should be a graduate of a secondary school of approved 
standing and should present 15 acceptable units of sec- 
ondary school work. These should include four units 
of English, two units of algebra, one of plane geome- 
try, one half of trigonometry and one unit each of 
physics and a second science. Deficiencies in English, 
mathematics and science may be satisfied by summer 
school attendance, or by an extension of the stated 



curriculum for one or two semesters chosen to fit the 
student's needs. 

Satisfactory placement in the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) in mathematics and English as given by the 
College Entrance Examination Board, or satisfactory 
placement in the American College Testing (ACT) 
program is required. 

Depending on the student's academic preparation, 
a student admitted to an engineering degree program 
path will be classified as enrolled either in Engineering 
or in Pre-Engineering within the program of his or her 
choice. 

A student will be classified as Pre-Engineering if the 
student is required to take, or is taking, two or more 
courses not designated as part of the degree require- 
ments in order to complete academic preparation for 
courses in the degree program. 

A student will be classified as Engineering if the stu- 
dent is admitted to a degree program without any of 
the conditions mentioned above or the student has sat- 
isfactorily completed all courses required to complete 
academic preparation. 

Engineering transfer students may be classified as 
either Engineering or Pre-Engineering, based on previ- 
ous preparation. 

Admission Classification: Students choosing Com- 
puter Science or Chemistry will be so designated. 
Students choosing a degree program in engineering 
and satisfying all requirements will be classified as 
Engineering students. Students choosing a degree pro- 
gram in engineering and requiring additional course- 
work will be designated Pre-Engineering. Students 
reclassified into Engineering from Pre-Engineering 
will be notified officially by the degree program chair. 

Choosing a Major 

A student may be accepted into the School of 
Engineering and Applied Science without declaring a 
major in a specific engineering discipline. Students 
who have chosen a major should follow the recom- 
mended first-year program for the major. Students 
who are undecided about their choice of engineering 
major should choose the degree program General 
Engineering and follow the recommended first-year 



Engineering & Applied Science 107 



program. Those students wishing to complete 
an engineering degree program other than General 
Engineering are strongly advised to decide on their 
new program by the beginning of the sophomore year. 
Students interested in Computer Science are advised 
to choose that option in their first year. 

All newly admitted students, including transfer 
students, are assigned a faculty adviser in the degree 
program of their choice. Students choosing General 
Engineering are assigned a faculty adviser by the 
Dean of the School. The faculty adviser will monitor 
the progress of the student and will confirm the com- 
pletion of requirements, if any, to change the desig- 
nation of the student from Pre-Engineering to 
Engineering. 

The common course requirements for the freshman 
year of study in the engineering majors Civil Engineer- 
ing (CE), Chemical Engineering (CM), Computer 
Engineering (CEN), Electrical Engineering (EE), 
General Engineering (GE), Industrial Engineering 
(IE) and Mechanical Engineering (ME) are: 

First Semester 

CH 1 1 5 General Chemistry I 

CH 117 General Chemistry I Laboratory 

E 105 Composition 

ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 

ES 108 Engineering Workshop 

(Note: ES 108 is not required 

for EE, GE and IE) 
M 117 Calculus I 

Second Semester 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I* 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

M 118 Calculus II 

Laboratory Science (a four-credit science course with 
a laboratory, specified by degree program) 

Performance Requirements: A cumulative quality 
point average of 2.0 or better is required. The student 
must also achieve a grade of "C" or better for each of 
the mathematics (prefix M), physics (prefix PH) and 
chemistry (prefix CH) courses in this list. Students 
may repeat a course once to improve a grade. 

* For the Industrial Engineering program requirement. 



please refer to the Industrial Engineering Department 
listing in this section. 

University Core Curriculum 

In addition to school and department requirements, 
students must fulfill all requirements of the university 
core curriculum. (See University Curricula section of 
the catalog.) Included within the core are requirements 
in the humanities and social sciences. See the section 
below under Humanities Electives for details. 

General Policy of the 
School of Engineering 

The following definitions apply to all degree pro- 
grams within the School of Engineering: 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer of credits for previous academic work is 
coordinated by the dean's office and assessed by depart- 
ment chairs, according to school policy, described in 
the document "Guidelines on Transfer Credit Awards." 
All transferred courses are the result of a determination 
of equivalence of course content and course level. 

Once accepted as matriculated, students who wish to 
earn credits toward the degree through academic work at 
other institutions must secure approval in advance, using 
the "Coordinated Course Authorization" form. 

Humanities Electives 

Humanities and social science courses are intended to 
develop the competencies required of all SEAS profes- 
sionals in creating the social, political, economic, cultur- 
al and aesthetically satisfying solutions to society's prob- 
lems. Such courses assist also in understanding the needs 
of and communicating the options to the various con- 
stituencies which impact on and are affected by these 
societal problems and their solutions. Specific courses 
chosen must satisfy university core requirements. 

Mathematics Electives 

These are courses from the mathematics depart- 
ment at the 300 or higher level. Faculty advisers 
should be consulted for recommendations on the most 
relevant mathematics electives for a student's career 
objectives. 



108 



Technical Electives 

Technical electives are upper-level courses directly 
pertinent to a student's major field of study. These 
electives must be approved by the student's faculty 
adviser and are usually chosen from engineering school 
courses. Faculty approval is important to ensure that 
students meet the prerequisite requirements. 

Design Electives 

Design electives within each program are those 
upper-level engineering courses that incorporate sub- 
stantial design activities. Suitable courses include a (D) 
following the course title. These courses may also be 
used as technical electives. 

The Co-op Program 

Students in the School of Engineering and Applied 
Science may participate in the cooperative education 
program (Co-op) which enables students to combine 
practical, paid work experience in an activity associated 
with their professional degree program. This "earn while 
you learn" program combines experiential and academ- 
ic preparation for a career. For further details see "The 
Co-op Program" section which appears earlier in this 
catalog or contact the SEAS co-op coordinator. 



General Engineering 

Chair, Oversight Committee: M. Ali Montazer, Ph.D. 

Faculty 

The General Engineering program leading to the 
bachelor's degree is administered through the office of 
the Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied 
Science, with an oversight committee of faculty. All of 
the faculty of SEAS constitute the faculty for this 
degree program. 

B.S., General Engineering 

The bachelor of science in general engineering 
(GE) is a degree program designed for those interest- 
ed in a career involving general engineering knowl- 
edge without the prescribed requirements of a specif- 



ic engineering discipline. It provides complete flexi- 
bility for a student to combine engineering with any 
other undergraduate discipline within the university, 
such as studies in: 

• business 

• liberal arts 

• computer science 

• sciences 

• teaching and education 

• other UNH programs 

It also provides the opportunity for including ele- 
ments of two different engineering disciplines in one 
degree program. 

Job opportunities depend on the combination 
selected and include: 

engineering and technical services 

technical management and sales 

engineering-related business activities 

music 

science-related activities 

computer-related activities 

technical writing 

medical services 

education 

The Degree Program 

The bachelor's degree program in general engineer- 
ing requires completion of 121 credit hours. Within 
the program requirement, the student must complete 
a "minor" in a specific discipline by taking six courses, 
consisting of 18 credit hours, which are required to 
satisfy a minor in most disciplines within the universi- 
ty. Four freely selected engineering courses, consisting 
of 12 credit hours, are taken as engineering electives. 
Three courses, consisting of 9 credit hours, are taken 
as completely free electives. The required courses also 
include the university core as well as most of the sci- 
ence, mathematics and engineering science core 
required of all engineering disciplines. 

Undecided Option 

Students who wish to earn an engineering degree 
in a designated discipline (CE, CEN, CM, EE, IE 
or ME), but who are undecided about choice of dis- 
cipline, should start the general engineering (GE) 
program and change majors to one of the specific 



Engineering & Applied Science 109 



degree programs when they have decided on an engi- 
neering specialization. Making a choice by the end of 
the first year of study will result in a smooth transition. 

Required Courses 

Semester 3 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 

LA 101 Business Law and the Regulatory 

Environment 
ME 101 Engineering Graphics 
PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 

Semester 4 

CE 205 Statics and Strength of Materials 
EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 
M 203 Calculus III 

PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics with 
Laboratory 

Semester 5 

E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation 
E 300 Writing Proficiency Examination 
ES 345 Applied Engineering Statistics, or 
M 204 Differential Equations 

One engineering course* 
One minor course** 
One social science elective 

Semester 6 

Two engineering courses* 

Two minor courses** 

One art/music/theatre elective 

Semester 7 

HS 306 Modern Technology and Western Culture, 

orWVi 300 The Nature of Science 
IE 414 Engineering Management 

One engineering course* 

One minor course** 

One philosophy/literature elective 

Semester 8 

ES 415 Professional Engineering Seminar 
Two minor Courses** 



Three free electives 

*Any CE, CEN, CM, EE, IE or ME course for 
which prerequisites are met. 

**Any set of courses, approved by the faculty adviser, 
in a single discipline such that these six courses taken 
together satisfy the requirements for a "minor" in the 
chosen discipline. 

Department of Chemistry 
and Chemical Engineering 

Chair: Michael A. Collura, Ph.D., PE. 

Professors: Michael A. Collura, Ph.D., Lehigh 
University (Process Design and Control, 
Computer Applications, Separation Processes); 
Peter J. Desio, Ph.D., University of New 
Hampshire (Organometallics, Ring-Chain 
Tautomerism in Orthoacylbenzoic Acids); 
Michael J. Saliby, Ph.D., SUNY at Binghamton 
(Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of 
Transition Metal Complexes); George L. 
WTieeler, Jacob Finley Buckman Professor of 
Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ph.D., 
University of Maryland (Biochemistry of Vision, 
Calcium Metabolism, Environmental Analysis) 

Associate Professor: Arthur S. Gow, III, Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University (Phase Equilibria, 
Molecular Thermodynamics; Calorimetry; 
Kinetics) 

Assistant Professors: W David Harding, Ph.D., 
Northwestern University (Oxidation Catalysis, 
Pollution Prevention, Environmental Processes); 
Eddie Luzik, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 
(Synthesis and Properties of Substituted, 
Unsaturated Organic Molecules) 

Jacob Finley Buckman Endowed 
Chair and Scholarships 

The Jacob Finley Buckman Endowed Chair of 
Chemistry and Chemical Engineering was estab- 
lished in 1981 by Mrs. Clarice Buckman of New 
Haven in memory of her late husband, Jacob Finley 
Buckman, the co-founder of Enthone Corporation. 



110 



The Clarice Buckman Scholarships are awarded to 
juniors and/or seniors majoring in chemistry or 
chemical engineering. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine practical, paid work experience in career 
fields with their college education. For further details 
see "The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in the 
catalog or contact the Co-op coordinator in the School 
of Engineering and Applied Science. 

Chemistry Club/Forensic Science Club 

The department has a chemistry club that is a stu- 
dent affiliate of the American Chemical Society. The 
club is open to all students, and all chemistry majors 
are encouraged to join. Club activities include proj- 
ects, field trips, films, group discussions and social 
activities. Presently, the Chemistry Club is holding 
combined events with the Forensic Science Club. 

Chemical Engineering Club 

The Chemical Engineering Club has ties to the 
American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). It 
provides students with the opportunity to socialize, 
meet chemical engineers working in the area, visit 
process plants and get involved in community projects. 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical engineers are creative problem solvers. 
They apply the fundamental principles of chemistry, 
physics, mathematics and economics to the solution of 
practical problems and to the search for new knowl- 
edge. Traditionally, chemical engineers develop, 
design, optimize and operate processes which convert 
material and energy resources into new or improved 
products. It was practitioners of this discipline who 
developed the technological infrastructure for indus- 
tries such as chemicals, petroleum products, plastics, 
textiles, pharmaceuticals and food processing. 

Currently, chemical engineers are concerned with 
the critical areas of resource depletion, energy conser- 
vation, recycling, pollution prevention and control, 



hazardous waste management, improved control of 
processes, increased safety and enhanced productivity. 
The major has also proven to be an excellent back- 
ground for the study of law, medicine or business. 

Mission and Goals 

The mission of the Chemical Engineering Program 
is to prepare a diverse student body for entrance into 
the Chemical Engineering profession and for an evolv- 
ing professional career. The following ten educational 
goals have been set to achieve the program mission: 

• Students can demonstrate the understanding 
of and an ability to apply concepts in basic science 
and mathematics and have a working knowledge of 
advanced chemistry. 

• Students can demonstrate the ability to apply the 
concepts of balances, rate and equilibrium relation- 
ships, and process/product/equipment analysis and 
design. 

• Students can demonstrate the ability to effectively 
communicate technical ideas to a variety of 
audiences. 

• Students can demonstrate proficiency in the use of 
computer tools typical of those used in the process 
industries for research, development, design and 
operation activities. 

• Students can demonstrate the ability to develop 
solutions to open-ended problems which achieve 
balance among competing constraints. 

• Students can demonstrate the ability to think cre- 
atively and to extend their knowledge through 
independent learning. 

• Students can demonstrate the ability to design and 
conduct experiments, analyze data obtained, assess 
overall results, and make recommendations regarding 
the outcome of their work. 

• Students can demonstrate the ability to apply an 
engineering approach to the solution of problems. 

• Students are aware that solutions to technical prob- 
lems have wide ranging effects on society. They can 
demonstrate the ability to incorporate considera- 
tion of such effects into their solutions. 

• Students can demonstrate the ability to function as 
an integral member of a multidisciplinary team. 

Achievement of these goals is assessed by a variety 
of means, including an Individualized Student 



Engineering & Applied Science 1 1 1 



Assessment (ISA). This assessment is performed by the 
faculty at the end of every chemical engineering course 
for each student in the class. Mastery level for each goal 
is rated on a numerical scale, which is linked to detailed 
objectives and performance criteria for that goal. 
Feedback is provided to the students via their depart- 
mental advisers in order to address any weaknesses. In 
addition, the compiled data is used to assess how well the 
course meets its stated objectives. Frequent meetings 
among the faculty to share this information assures a 
well-coordinated curriculum for the students. 

B.S., Chemical Engineering 

The chemical engineering program is challenging 
and demands hard work, but for those genuinely 
interested, it develops the required depth of knowl- 
edge to embark on a fascinating and satisfying profes- 
sional career in industry or government, or to con- 
tinue study at the graduate level. The B.S. in chemi- 
cal engineering degree is accredited by the American 
Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and by the 
Engineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(EAC/ABET). 

The freshman year in chemical engineering is com- 
mon with the other engineering disciplines, including 
ES 108 Engineering Workshop in the first semester 
and CH 116/118 General Chemistry II with 
Laboratory. 

The first chemical engineering courses, taken in 
the sophomore year, are the beginning of a well-inte- 
grated sequence. Each chemical engineering course 
contributes uniquely to the development of skills in 
problem-solving, communication, computer usage 
and engineering design. Several common themes 
weave throughout these courses, including safety, con- 
cern for the environment and practical application of 
knowledge to real world problems. A comprehensive 
laboratory experience contributes to these educational 
objectives through the use of modern, industrial-type 
data acquisition and control instruments and comput- 
ers on pilot-scale process equipment. Comprehensive 
design projects in the senior year enable the student to 
synthesize and focus the entire curriculum. Several 
engineering or science electives allow flexibility in the 



program for including areas of special interest. 

Required Courses 

(130 credits total including Freshman year) 

Sophomore 

CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CM 201-202 Fundamentals of Chemical 

Engineering I and II 
CS 111 Introduction to C Programming II 

(for non-CS majors) 
M 203 Calculus III 

M 204 Differential Equations 

PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 

One engineering elective (200-level or higher) 

Junior 

CH 331-332 Physical Chemistry I and II 
CH 333-334 Physical Chemistry 1 and II 

Laboratory 
CM 301 Transport Phenomena Analysis 

CM 310 Transport Operations I 

with Laboratory 
CM 311 Chemical Engineering 

Thermodynamics 
CM 321 Reaction Kinetics and Reactor Design 

EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 

E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation, 

or an elective in the humanities or 

social sciences 



Senior 




CM 401 


Mass Transfer Operations 


CM 410 


Transport Operations II with 




Laboratory 


CM 420 


Process Design Principles 


CM 421 


Plant and Process Design 


CM 431 


Process Dynamics and Control with 




Laboratory 


ES 415 


Professional Engineering Seminar 



112 



Plus one literature or philosophy elective, one art/ 

music/theatre elective, one social science elective 
Plus 6 credit hours of engineering or science electives 

Students who wish to concentrate in a particular 
area should select a cluster of elective courses which 
match their interests. Examples of some popular clus- 
ters arerlar clusters are: 

Biochemical Engineering Applications: 

BI 253 Biology for Science Majors 

with Laboratory I 
BI 301 Microbiology 
BI 461 Biochemistry 

Biotechnology Applications: 

BI 253 Biology for Science Majors with Laboratory I 

BI 301 Microbiology 

BI 308 Cell Biology 

BI 311 Molecular Biology 

Environmental Engineering Applications: 

CE 315 Environmental Engineering 

CE 404 Water and Wastewater Engineering 

CM 521 Air Pollution Fundamentals 

Occupational Safety and Health 
Applications: 

SH 100 Safety Organization and Management 
SH 1 10 Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 
SH 400 Occupational Safety and Health 
Legal Standards 

In some cases, students may wish to take courses 
beyond those required for the degree to gain depth in 
an area of interest. 

A.S., Chemical Engineering 

The associate's degree in chemical engineering is 
not intended as a terminal degree. It may serve as a 
milestone, formally marking completion of half the 
bachelor's program requirements, or it may be com- 
bined with another engineering degree to obtain a 
broader background. All courses in the A.S. program 



count toward the B.S. program requirements. A.S. 
requirements include the common freshman engineer- 
ing program, as discussed in the B.S. requirements 
description above, and the courses shown below. 

Required Courses 

(70 credits total including Freshman Year) 

CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CM 201-202 Fundamentals of Chemical 

Engineering I and II 
CM 301 Transport Phenomena Analysis 

CM 310 Transport Operations I with 

Laboratory 
M 203 Calculus III 

M 204 Differential Equations 

Plus one social science elective and one art/music/ 
theatre elective. 

Minor in Chemical Engineering 

Students who wish to earn a minor in Chemical 
Engineering should complete 6 courses in Chemical 
Engineering, including the following: 

CM 201-202 Fundamentals of Chemical 

Engineering I and II 
CM 30 1 Transport Phenomena Analysis 

CM 310 Transport Operations I 

with Laboratory 

Plus two additional chemical engineering (CM) courses. 

Chemistry 

Chemists are concerned with the structure and 
analysis of matter and the changes that matter under- 
goes. Today's chemists are solving chemical problems 
and developing new substances with the increasing use 
of laboratory instruments. Many of these instruments 
are interfaced with computers for rapid data analysis 
and display. 

Careers for chemists in today's market include the 
rapidly developing fields of instrumentation, comput- 
ers, energy, environment, forensics, medicine, safety 
and health, pharmaceuticals, product and equipment 
development, chemical engineering, plastics and poly- 



Engineering & Applied Science 113 



mers, synthetic fibers, industrial chemistry, technical 
sales and services, and management. 

The B.S. in chemistry program consists of courses 
recommended by the American Chemical Society and 
provides a rigorous background well-suited for those 
students who will pursue graduate studies in chem- 
istry. The program is also highly recommended for 
premedical students. The program contains six techni- 
cal elective courses. By careful selection of courses, 
these electives allow the student to develop a concen- 
tration in a related field such as biotechnology, bio- 
chemistry, computer science, environmental studies or 
an engineering field 

Students majoring in forensic science may also earn 
a B.S. degree in chemistry by taking 12-16 credits in 
addition to those required for the B.S. degree in foren- 
sic science. 

The B.A. program in chemistry appears in this cat- 
alog under the College of Arts and Sciences. 

B.S., Chemistry 

Required Courses 

Students majoring in chemistry must complete the 
following courses for a total of 123-126 credits: 

Freshman 

CH 115-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

M 117-118 Calculus I and n 
PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves 

with Laboratory 

Sophomore 

CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CH 211 Quantitative Analysis with Laboratory 

CH 221 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

M 203 Calculus III 



PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 

with Laboratory 
Plus one computer science (CS) elective, or an 
approved technical elective* 

Plus one social science elective 

Junior 

CH 331-332 Physical Chemistry I and II 
CH 333-334 Physical Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CH 341 Synthetic Methods in Chemistry 

HU 300 The Nature of Science 

Plus two technical electives*, one advanced chemistry 
elective, one literature or philosophy elective, 
one art/music/theatre elective, and a second 
social science elective. 

Senior 

CH 4 1 1 Chemical Literature 

CH 412 Seminar 

CH 451 Thesis with Laboratory, or advanced 

chemistry or chemical engineering course 
CH 501 Advanced Organic Chemistry 
CH 521 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
CH 599 Independent Study, or advanced chemistry 

or chemical engineering course 

Plus one math/computer/biology elective and four 
technical electives.* 

* To be chosen in consultation with student's adviser. 

Teaching Chemistry 

Students interested in earning a teaching certificate 
in secondary education in chemistry may enter the 
graduate program at UNH. The B.S. or B.A. in chem- 
istry is the best choice for a major for those planning to 
teach at the secondary level, but other related majors are 
also acceptable. Students interested in teaching science 
at the middle school level need a variety of science 
courses, including chemistry. Please contact the educa- 
tion department for additional information. 

B.A., Chemistry 

The B.A. in chemistry program appears in the 
College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. 



114 



A.S., Chemistry 

The associate's in chemistry degree includes about 
half of the courses required for the bachelor's degree. 
Students wishing to earn this degree must complete 
the common freshman engineering courses listed 
above for the B.S. degree, the university associate's 
degree core and several other designated courses. All 
courses taken for the associate's degree are applicable 
toward the bachelor's degree. 

Minor in Chemistry 

Students minoring in chemistry must complete 
23-24 credit hours including the following courses : 

Required Courses 

CH 115-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry I and II 

Laboratory 
CH 21 1 Quantitative Analysis with Laboratory 

CH 221 Instrumental Methods of VVnalysis 

with Laboratory 

Department of Civil 
and Environmental 
Engineering 

Chair: Gregory P. Broderick, Ph.D. 

Professors Emeriti: M. Hamdy Bechir, Sc.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; John C. 
Martin, M.E., Yale University 

Professors: Ross M. Lanius, Jr., M.S., University of 
New Haven, M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut; 
David J. Wall, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Associate Professors: Gregory P. Broderick, 
Ph.D., University of Texas; Agamemnon D. 
Koutsospyros, Ph.D., Polytechnic University 

Assistant Professor: Jean Nocito-Gobel, Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts 



Mission and Goals 

The mission of the department of civil and envi- 
ronmental engineering is to create and administer a 
quality civil engineering program designed to achieve 
four major goals: 

• educate a new generation of civil engineers to meet 
the challenges, demands and expectations of society; 

• cultivate, enrich and promote scholarship, respon- 
sibility and service among our graduates; 

• disseminate new knowledge; and 

• nurture interdisciplinary education for solving the 
problems facing an ever-changing society. 

In order to achieve its mission, the civil engineering 
program has the following objectives: 

• provide educational experiences that prepare our 
students for professional practice of modern civil 
engineering in a global, societal and environmental 
context; 

• promote scholarship and problem-solving skills; 

• instill an understanding of the technical, economic, 
political, ethical and humanistic dimensions of civil 
engineering projects; 

• prepare students to interact and communicate 
effectively in multidisciplinary fields; 

• instill the need and provide the educational 
foundation for life-long learning; and 

• encourage service to the civil engineering profes- 
sion and the society through professional registra- 
tion and community involvement. 

Civil engineering is the broadest of the engineering 
professions and the parent from which most other 
fields of engineering have developed. The program in 
civil engineering provides students with the knowledge 
and skills required to identify and solve technical 
problems of society in a practical and ethical way. The 
curriculum provides an integrated educational experi- 
ence that combines study in mathematics, basic and 
engineering science, communication, humanities and 
the social sciences while integrating practical experi- 
ence in laboratory experimentation, problem solving 
and engineering design throughout the curriculum. 
The civil engineering program is accredited by the En- 
gineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(EAC/ABET). 



Engineering & Applied Science 1 1 5 



The first rwo years of study include mathematics, ba- 
sic science, communication, engineering science and 
design. The junior year courses are common for all civil 
engineering majors and include basic background cours- 
es in engineering science while integrating elements of 
design. In the senior year, concentrated engineering 
design courses are available in the areas of environmen- 
tal engineering, geotechnical engineering, structures, 
transportation and water resources. Through the senior 
design project courses and appropriate selection of tech- 
nical electives, an in-depth study of a specialized area of 
civil engineering is possible. Humanities and social sci- 
ence courses are included at all levels of the curriculum. 

The civil engineering program is enriched by a 
diverse student body which includes students with a 
wide range of ages, professional and nonprofessional 
experiences, and nationalities. Graduates of the pro- 
gram are encouraged to continue their education 
throughout their professional careers and to become 
registered professional engineers. 

Internship Requirement 

The internship program is intended to enrich the 
academic experience of our undergraduate students, 
providing exposure to and participation in a working 
engineering environment. Each internship must 
involve a partnership consisting of the student, our 
faculty and employers/organizations to provide each 
student intern with an optimal experience. A mini- 
mum of 300 hours performing relevant engineering 
duties is required prior to graduation. Students must 
complete 60 credit hours toward the bachelor's degree 
in civil engineering before an internship is attempted. 

The internship carries no credit for the degree; 
however, the requirement may be satisfied utilizing a 
co-op position, summer employment, part-time or 
full-time positions that are approved by the student's 
employer and by the department/internship coordina- 
tor as relevant to the goals of the internship experi- 
ence. A waiver (or substitution) of the internship 
requirement may be granted for students who are 
employed in the field, subject to a formal review by the 
department/internship coordinator. The student's 
request for such a waiver must be initiated one year 
prior to the anticipated graduation date. 



Student Chapter of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers 

At UNH, an active student chapter of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers sponsors techni- 
cal lectures, field trips and social activities that offer an 
opportunity for students to interact with practicing 
professionals. Membership is open to all civil engineer- 
ing students in good standing. 

Chi Epsilon 

Students with high academic standing are nominat- 
ed annually for membership in Chi Epsilon, the 
national honor society for civil engineers. 

B.S., Civil Engineering 

Students must complete a total of 130 credit hours 
for a degree in civil engineering, including the engi- 
neering requirements for the freshman year listed 
earlier in this section, the university core requirements 
and the internship requirement. Students are also 
required to earn a cumulative quality point ratio of no 
less than 2.0 in all civil engineering courses and tech- 
nical electives. The required courses for the program 
are listed below: 

Required Courses 

The freshman year courses are the same as the com- 
mon courses for the first year of the B.S. degree pro- 
gram in engineering described previously, with PH 
150 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with Laboratory to 
be taken as the laboratory science course in the second 
semester of the freshman year. 

Sophomore 

CE 203 Elementary Surveying 
CE 205 Statics and Strength of Materials 
CE 218 Civil Engineering Systems 
HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 
IE 204 Engineering Economics 
M 203 Calculus III 
M 204 Differential Equations 
ME 101 Engineering Graphics 
ME 204 Dynamics 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 
with Laboratory 



116 



Plus a laboratory science (either BI 121 General and 
Human Biology with Laboratory, or CH 1 16 
General Chemistry 11 and CH 118 General 
Chemistry II Laboratory) 



Engineering Geology 

Soil Mechanics 

Hydraulics 

Water Resources Engineering 

Structural Analysis 

Mechanics and Structures Laboratory 

Steel Design and Construction, or CE 409 

Concrete Design and Construction, or CE 

412 Wood Engineering 

Probability and Statistics I 

Thermodynamics I, or EE 201 

Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

social science elective and 
literature or philosophy elective. 



Transportation Engineering 
Environmental Engineering 
Soil Mechanics Laboratory 
Hydraulics and Environmental 
Laboratory 

CE 407 Professional and Ethical Practice 

of Engineering 

CE 500-501 Senior Project I and II 

Plus One art/music/theater elective, 9 credit hours of 
civil engineering technical electives of which 6 
credits must be civil engineering design courses. 

A.S., Civil Engineering 

The associate's degree in civil engineering is not 
designed to be a terminal degree. It simply provides 
formal evidence that the student has completed about 
half of the courses required for the bachelor's degree 
program. Students wishing to earn this degree must 
complete the first three semesters of the B.S. in civil 
engineering program, satisfy the university associate's 
degree core and complete the fourth semester courses 
CE 206, CE 218, an art/music/theatre elective and 
any two of the following: IE 204, ME 204 or a labo- 
ratory science (BI 121, or CH 1 16 and 1 18). 



Junior 


CE 206 


CE 304 


CE 306 


CE 309 


CE 312 


CE 323 


CE 408 


M 371 


ME 301 


Plus one 


one 


Senior 


CE 301 


CE 315 


CE 327 


CE 328 



Minor in Civil Engineering 

Students are required to complete 18 credit hours 
of civil engineering courses for the minor. With the 
approval of the chair, engineering majors may substi- 
tute other civil engineering courses for a minor. Stu- 
dents must fulfill all prerequisites for courses chosen. 

Required Courses 

Six courses from the following list: 

CE 203 Elementary Surveying 

CE 205 Statics and Strength of Materials 

CE 218 Civil Engineering Systems 

CE 301 Transportation Engineering 

CE 304 Soil Mechanics 

CE 306 Hydraulics 

CE 309 Water Resources Engineering 

CE 312 Structural Analysis 

CE 315 Environmental Engineering 

CE 407 Professional and Ethical Practice 
of Engineering 

Department of 
Computer Science 

Acting Chair: David Eggert, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: Edward T. George, D.Engr., 
Yale University 

Professors: Alice E. Fischer, Ph.D., Harvard 

University; Roger G. Frey, Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professors: William R. Adams, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut; Barun Chandra, 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; David Eggert, 
Ph.D., University of South Florida; Tahany 
Fergany, Ph.D., University of Connecticut; 
Norman Hosay, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Professor: Elaine L. Sonderegger, E.E., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Lecturers: Jacalyn Diesenhouse, M.A., Columbia 
University; Gregory Gibson, M.S., University of 
New Haven 

Practitioner-in-Residence: Liberty Page, M.S., 
University of New Haven 



Engineering & Applied Science 117 



The department of computer science offers both 
bachelor's and associate's degree programs in comput- 
er science. Their objectives are described below. 

B.S., Computer Science 

The bachelor's degree program in computer 
science is nationally accredited by the Computing 
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board 
for Engineering and Technology (CAC/ABET). 

The goals of the bachelor's degree program are to 
inform, challenge and train our diverse student body 
for a constantly changing world of technology. A 
strong student will be prepared for graduate study in 
computer science. At graduation, every student 
should: 

• have acquired a solid body of knowledge and 
understanding of computer hardware, software 
and theory as defined by the Association for 
Computing Machinery (ACM) guidelines; 

• be able to communicate technical material in 
written English; 

• be able to design and implement a system for a 
real application; 

• have developed a professional level of skill in pro- 
gramming, both individually and as part of a team; 

• be ready for employment at a professional level 
in industry; 

• be aware of the legal and ethical issues that 
confront the field of computing; 

• know the rights and obligations of the practicing 
computing professional; and 

• be prepared for life-long learning in the field. 

Typical initial job titles might be applications pro- 
grammer or software engineer. Later titles might be 
systems analyst, team leader or software consultant. 
Areas of application range from database management 
to highly technical design projects. 

The computer science program includes instruc- 
tion in several programming languages and a strong 
base in mathematics. Intermediate courses include the 
study of systems, hardware and theory. Advanced 
courses are available in various application areas. With 
the help of the adviser, each student will also choose 
some area of interest outside of the computer science 



department and pursue a specialization in that field. 
It is often easy to extend this specialization into a 
minor in the selected field. Popular areas include 
mathematics, engineering, business, social sciences 
and multimedia. 

Required Courses 

A total of 127 credit hours, including the universi- 
ty core curriculum, is required for the degree of bach- 
elor of science in computer science. 

Freshman 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 166 Fundamentals of Digital Computing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

M 117-118 Calculus I and II 

One social science elective 

Plus the first semester of a laboratory science sequence 

Sophomore 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

CS 314 Computer Organization 

EE 155 Digital Systems I 

EE 256 Digital Systems Laboratory 

M 203 Calculus III 

One art/music/theatre elective 
One computer science (CS) elective 
One social science elective 

Plus the second semester of a laboratory science 

sequence and another laboratory science course 

Junior 

CS 310 Computing Theory 

CS 320 Operating Systems 

CS 326 Data Structures and Algorithms II 

CS 330 Systems Programming 

E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation 

ES 345 Applied Engineering Statistics 

HU 300 The Nature of Science 

One literature/philosophy elective 
One junior elective in mathematics or 
industrial engineering 

Two specialization electives 



118 



Senior 

CS 338 Structure of Programming Languages 
CS 416 Computer Ethics 

One CS design methodology elective 

One CS elective 

Two CS senior-level electives 

Two technical electives 

Two specialization electives 

One humanities/social science elective 

In addition, or as part of the preceding require- 
ments, each student must complete a substantial pro- 
gramming project and demonstrate familiarity with 
another programming language in addition to C. 

A.S., Computer Science 

This two-year associate's program is designed for 
part-time students and for those who wish to enter the 
job market as soon as possible. All credits can be 
applied toward the B.S. degree in computer science. It 
is recommended, however, that students enroll in the 
bachelor's degree program, earning the associate's 
degree as a stepping stone toward the B.S. in comput- 
er science. A total of 62 credit hours is required for the 
awarding of the A.S. in computer science. 

Required Courses 

Freshman 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 166 Fundamentals of Digital Computing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

HS 102 The Western World In Modern Times 

M 117-118 Calculus I and II 

One social science elective. 

Plus the first semester of a laboratory science sequence 

Sophomore 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

CS 314 Computer Organization 

EE 155 Digital Systems I 

EE 256 Digital Systems Laboratory 

M 203 Calculus III 

One art/music/theatre elective 



One computer science programming elective 
Two technical electives 

Plus the second semester of a laboratory science 
sequence 

Minor in Computer Science 

Students may minor in computer science by com- 
pleting 19 credit hours of computer science courses. 
Those persons considering a minor in computer sci- 
ence should seek guidance from the CS undergraduate 
coordinator as early as possible. Students must com- 
plete the following courses: 

CS 1 10 Introduction to C Programming I 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 166 Fundamentals of Digital Computing 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

Plus three CS electives selected from courses at the 
300 level or higher 

Computer Programming Certificate 

This certificate is designed for individuals who re- 
quire rapid entry into the job market as a computer 
programmer. Candidates do not need to matriculate 
into an associate's or bachelor's degree program at the 
university, but may enroll directly as a student pursu- 
ing a certificate. Credits earned toward the certificate 
may be applied toward the requirements for a degree 
program at a later date. Students must complete 22 
credit hours including the following courses: 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 166 Fundamentals of Digital Computing 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

Plus a CS programming elective and three CS electives 
selected from courses at the 300 level or higher 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative edu- 
cation program (Co-op) which enables students to com- 
bine practical, paid work experience in career fields with 
their college education. Aiter the sophomore year, many 
computer science majors find co-op jobs, either during 
the summer or during the academic year. These jobs 



Engineering & Applied Science 119 



strengthen students' academic skills, allow students to 
gain perspective on their course work and provide the 
kind of experience that employers value. For further 
details see "The Co-op Program" which appears earlier 
in the catalog or contact the Co-op coordinator in the 
School of Engineering and Applied Science. 

Department of 
Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 

Chair: Daniel C. O'Keefe, Ph.D. 

Professors Emeriti: Gerald J. Kirwin, Ph.D., 
Syracuse University; Kantilal K. Surti, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Professors: Andrew J. Fish, Jr., Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut; Ali M. Golbazi, Ph.D., Wayne State 
University; Darrell W. Horning, Ph.D., University 
of Illinois; Bijan Karimi, Ph.D., Oklahoma State 
University; Daniel C. O'Keefe, Ph.D., Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute 

Associate Professor: Bouzid Aliane, Ph.D., 
Polytechnic Institute of New York 

The department of electrical and computer engi- 
neering offers bachelor of science degrees in electrical 
engineering and in computer engineering, and at the 
graduate level, a master of science in electrical engi- 
neering with an option in computer engineering. 

Electrical and computer engineering encompasses 
many practical and diverse technologies including elec- 
tronics, electromagnetics, power, communications, con- 
trol, microprocessors, computer systems, digital systems, 
signal and information processing, and fiber optics. 

Electrical and computer engineers serve in many 
professional capacities, which require a thorough 
understanding of the scientific principles that govern 
electrical phenomena. These activities often lead to 
new concepts and techniques and sometimes, to the 
discovery of new phenomena. The technical complex- 
ity of the services or products provided by many com- 
panies requires personnel with the appropriate educa- 
tional background. 



Mission and Goals 

The mission of the department of electrical and 
computer engineering is to prepare students from 
diverse backgrounds for professional practice and con- 
tinued growth in electrical and computer engineering. 

To accomplish this mission, the department is 
committed to the following major educational goals: 

• to provide an education recognized within 
the profession; 

• to provide a broad-based educational 
experience; 

• to create, develop and deliver new and 
innovative knowledge; and 

• to prepare graduates for employment in 
professional practice and/or graduate study. 

The curriculum is designed to provide students 
with the skills and the basic scientific background 
needed to become proficient in today's technology and 
to keep abreast of future developments in the electrical 
and computer engineering profession. 

The early part of the program emphasizes electrical 
and computer engineering skills that form the back- 
ground for the upper-level elective and design courses. 
Physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer program- 
ming, basic engineering science and general education 
courses supplement the required and elective electrical 
and computer engineering courses. 

The upper-level electrical and computer engineer- 
ing coursework provides areas of concentration for in- 
depth study. Students can choose additional technical 
electives from outside the area of concentration to pro- 
vide more breadth of knowledge. 

To influence our society's evolution, the electrical and 
computer engineer must acquire an understanding of 
our society, our cultural heritage, and the human condi- 
tion. The engineer must communicate ideas to other 
engineers and to the public. The electrical and comput- 
er engineering program accomplishes this via liberal and 
humanistic studies. The university core requirements 
allow students to expand their cultural and intellectual 
horizons by exposing them to the humanities and social 
sciences. Students learn written and oral communication 
skills in three dedicated courses and apply these skills in 
the humanities and social science core courses as well as 
in laboratory and design courses of the major. 



120 



An important feature of the electrical and comput- 
er engineering curriculum is the design experience. 
Our students develop the ability to analyze appropri- 
ate models, conduct empirical tests, gather relevant 
information, interpret empirical tests, develop appro- 
priate models, develop alternative solutions, formulate 
problems and synthesize in our laboratory sequence. 
This sequence of courses takes the student from a well- 
structured laboratory experiment in the sophomore 
year to the design project in the senior year in gradual 
steps. This project allows students to demonstrate 
engineering abilities by proposing, completing and 
reporting on a detailed engineering design. 

Internship Requirement 

The internship program is intended to enrich the aca- 
demic experience of our undergraduate students, provid- 
ing exposure to and participation in a working engineer- 
ing environment. Each internship must involve a part- 
nership consisting of the student, our faculty and 
employers/organizations to provide each student intern 
with an optimal experience. A minimum of 300 hours 
performing relevant engineering duties is required prior 
to graduation. Students must complete 60 credit hours 
toward the bachelor's degree in electrical or computer 
engineering before an internship is attempted. 

The internship carries no credit for the degree; 
however, the requirement may be satisfied utilizing a 
co-op position, summer employment, part-time or 
full-time positions that are approved by the student's 
employer and by the department/internship coordina- 
tor as relevant to the goals of the internship experi- 
ence. A waiver (or substitution) of the internship 
requirement may be granted for students who are 
employed in the field, subject to a formal review by the 
department/internship coordinator. The student's 
request for such a waiver must be initiated one year 
prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

Student Societies 

The department of electrical and computer engineer- 
ing sponsors a student section of the Institute of 
Electrical and Electronics Engineers. This organization 
supports visiting lecturers, educational workshops, field 
trips to surrounding industrial sites and social events. 



Eta Kappa Nu, the national honor society for elec- 
trical and computer engineers, is represented by the 
Zeta Rho Chapter at the University of New Haven. 
This society exists to honor superior students and to 
encourage high scholastic achievements. 

B.S., Electrical Engineering 

The B.S. program in electrical engineering is 
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Com- 
mission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology (EAC/ABET). 

Electrical engineering is concerned with the analy- 
sis, design, development and operation of electrical 
and electronic systems. Examples of such systems 
include communication, fiber optics, data processing, 
power generation and distribution, control and instru- 
mentation. Digital circuits and computers are impor- 
tant integral parts of such systems and are widely used 
by electrical engineers in their design and develop- 
ment. The electrical engineer is also concerned with 
the devices that make up systems such as transistors, 
integrated circuits, rotating machines, antennas, lasers 
and computer-memory devices. 

Program Objectives 

The educational objectives of the electrical engi- 
neering program are to produce graduates who: 

• can think creatively to formulate and solve 
electrical engineering problems; 

• can design electrical engineering systems, subsys- 
tems or processes to meet performance, economic, 
safety and environmental specifications; 

• have an understanding of professional and ethical 
responsibility as it relates to the electrical 
engineering profession; 

• have a sufficiently broad foundation in electrical 
engineering to allow them to grow and develop 
with a rapidly changing technological environment; 

• apply effective writing, speaking and communica- 
tion skills in professional presentations; 

• understand and apply the techniques, skills and 
tools of modern electrical engineering practice to 
analysis and design problems. 

The bachelor of science in electrical engineering 



Engineering & Applied Science 121 



offers four upper-level concentration areas: 

1. Communications-including communications 
systems, fiber optics, signal processing and 
stochastic systems 

2. Control-including analog and digital control 
systems, fuzzy control 

3. Digital-including sequential logic design, 
computer architecture, microprocessors systems 

4. Power-including machines, industrial power 
systems transmission and distribution. 

Required Courses 

Students must complete a total of 129 credit hours 
for a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineer- 
ing including the requirements for the freshman year 
listed earlier in this section and the internship require- 
ment. Humanities or social science electives must be 
selected to fulfill the core curriculum requirements of 
the university and ABET. 

Technical elective courses in the B.S.E.E. program 
must be selected from upper-level offerings (third or 
fourth year) under the guidance and approval of the 
student's academic adviser. At least three must be elec- 
trical and computer engineering departmental courses. 

In the final year of study the student takes a senior 
design sequence EE 457 and EE 458 that is spread over 
two semesters. In the first semester the student selects a 
topic, does a literature search, and a preliminary design. 
In the second semester, the student completes the 
design, implements the project and presents results. 

Freshman 

CH 1 1 5 General Chemistry I 

CH 1 17 General Chemistry I Laboratory 

CS 110 Introduction to C Programming I 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 

M 117-118 Calculus I and II 

PH 150 Mechanics, Heat and Waves 
with Laboratory 

Sophomore 

CS 111 Introduction to C Programming II (for 
non-CS Majors) 



E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation 

EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

EE 202 Network Analysis 

EE 247 Electronics I 

EE 155 Digital Systems I 

EE 256 Digital Systems Laboratory 

EE 257 Analog Circuits Laboratory 

M 203 Calculus III 

M 204 Differential Equations 

ME 204 Dynamics 

PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 
with Laboratory 

Junior 

EE 302 Systems Analysis 

EE 306 Electronic Materials and Devices 

EE 320 Random Signal Analysis 

EE 348 Electronics II 

EE 349 Electronics Design Laboratory 

EE 371 Computer Engineering 

EE 355 Control Systems 

HS 1 02 The Western World in Modern Times 

Plus one mathematics elective and two technical 
electives. 

Senior 

EE 445 Communication Systems 

EE 457 Design Preparation 

EE 458 Electrical Engineering Design Laboratory 

EE 46 1 Electromagnetic Theory 

ES 415 Professional Engineering Seminar 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 

ME 301 Thermodynamics I 

Plus two technical electives, one art/music/theatre 
elective, one social science elective and one 
literature or philosophy elective. 

A.S., Electrical Engineering 

The associate's degree in electrical engineering 
includes about half the courses required for the bache- 
lor's degree. Students wishing to earn this degree must 
complete the following courses: 



Fresh 



man 



CH 1 1 5 General Chemistry I 

CH 1 17 General Chemistry I Laboratory 



122 



CS 1 10 Introduction to C Programming I 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

M 117-118 Calculus I and II 

PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 
Laboratory 

Plus one social science elective 

Sophomore 

CS 1 1 1 Introduction to C Programming II (for 

non-CS Majors) 
E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics with 

Laboratory 
EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 
EE 202 Network Analysis 
EE 247 Electronics I 
EE 155 Digital Systems I 
EE 256 Digital Systems Laboratory 
EE 257 Analog Circuits Laboratory 
ME 204 Dynamics 
EE 371 Computer Engineering 

Plus one art/music/theatre elective 

Minor in Electrical Engineering 

A student may obtain a minor in electrical engi- 
neering by completing the following courses: 

EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

EE 202 Network Analysis 

EE 155 Digital Systems I 

EE 256 Digital Systems Laboratory 

EE 257 Analog Circuits Laboratory 

Plus one of the following sequences: 

EE 247 Electronics I and EE 306 Electronic 
Materials and Devices, or EE 371 
Computer Engineering and EE 356 
Digital Systems II, or EE 302 Systems 
Analysis and EE 355 Control Systems 

The student must fulfill the prerequisites for these 
courses. 

Students contemplating either a minor or an asso- 
ciate's degree should consult with the department chair 
early in their program. 



B.S., Computer Engineering 

Coordinator: Darrell W Horning, Ph.D. 

Computer engineering is concerned with design 
and implementation of digital systems such as com- 
puter systems, computer-based control systems, inter- 
faces between digital and analog systems, interfaces 
between hardware and software and control software 
for embedded computer systems. This program spans 
the disciplines of both electrical engineering and com- 
puter science, and can loosely be described as bridging 
the area between the two. 

Computers are used in almost every device or system 
manufactured today, from large multi-computer sys- 
tems to cell phones, and credit card reading devices. In 
addition, they are used in signal processing applications, 
speech recognition, medical imaging, and picture and 
data communication. Internet and the web are possible 
in part because of advances in computing machines and 
data communication created by people working in the 
capacity of computer engineers. Careers for computer 
engineers are found in all phases of the production of 
these devices and systems, from design, manufacturing 
and maintenance to marketing, and sales. 

Educational Objectives 

Upon completion of the program, a graduate of the 
computer engineering program should be able to: 

• demonstrate both hardware and software skills 
and understanding, 

• understand the design tradeoffs between 
hardware and software, 

• design embedded real-time systems, 

• design and interface between a computer system 
and a digital communication system network, 

• design a processor and understand basic computer 
architecture and organization. 

Design and problem solving are the central themes 
of this program. This engineering area uses the engi- 
neering and hardware approach of electrical engineer- 
ing, and the knowledge of computing structures and the 
algorithmic approach of computer science. The first two 
years of the program concentrate on basic science, 
mathematics and engineering. The last two years are 
comprised of courses in traditional digital systems, com- 
puter systems, networks, electrical systems and design 



Engineering &C Applied Science 123 



of software systems. There are four electives in the 
fourth year that give the student an opportunity to 
explore a hardware and software-oriented program. The 
final year has a senior design course spread over two 
semesters in which the student designs a device, system 
or sofi^vare application. Depending on the student's 
interests, the project can be hardware oriented, softiware 
oriented or hardware/software oriented. The program 
also has a general education component in communica- 
tions, economics and the humanities needed to create a 
well-rounded professional. 

Required Courses 

Students must complete a total of 128 credit hours 
for a bachelor of science degree in computer engineer- 
ing. Humanities or social science electives must be 
selected to fulfill the core curriculum requirements of 
the university and students must complete the intern- 
ship requirement. 

Program core courses are advanced CS or EE cours- 
es that are considered to be in the area of computer 
engineering. The technical electives are any 300-level or 
above CS or EE courses that fit into the students plan 
of study and are approved by the academic advisor. 

In the final year of study the student takes a senior 
design sequence CEN 457 and CEN 458 that is spread 
over two semesters. In the first semester the student 
selects a topic, does a literature search, and a preliminary 
design. In the second semester, the student completes 
design, implements project and presents results. 

The following list shows the sequence of courses 
that a student should follow to complete the program 
in four years. 



Freshman 

CH 115 
CH 117 



General Chemistry I 
General Chemistry I Lab 
CS 1 10 Introduction to C Programming I 

CS 112 Introduction to C Programming II 

CS 166 Fundamentals of Digital Computing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 

M 117-118 Calculus I and II 
PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 

Laboratory 



Sophomore 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

E 225 Tech Writing and Presentation 

EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

EE 155 Digital Systems I 

EE 256 Digital Systems Lab 

EE 356 Digital Systems II 

EE 371 Computer Engineering 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

M 203 Calculus III 

M 204 Differential Equations 

PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 
with Laboratory 

Junior 

CS 320 Operating Systems 

CS 330 Systems Programming 

CS 526 Object-Oriented Principles and 

Practice/C++ 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

EE 247 Electronics I 

EE 257 Analog Circuits Laboratory 

EE 302 Systems Analysis 

EE 320 Random Signal Analysis 

EE 472 Computer Architecture 

EE 475 Microprocessors 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 

Senior 

CS 416 Computer Ethics 

CS 447 Computer Communications 

CEN 457 Design Preparation 

CEN 458 Senior Design Laboratory 

Plus four technical electives, one literature/philosophy 
elective, one social science elective and one 
art/music/theatre elective 

Minor in Computer Engineering 

A student may obtain a minor in computer engi- 
neering by completing the following courses: 

CS 166 Fundamentals of Digital Computing 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

EE 247 Electronics I 

EE' 155 Digital Systems I 

EE 256 Digital Systems Lab 

EE 371 Computer Engineering I 



124 



Department of 
Industrial Engineering 

Chair: Ronald N. Wentworth, Ph.D. 

Professors Emeriti: Joseph A. Arnold, M.S., 

Southern Connecticut State College; William S. 
Gere, Jr., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Professors: Ira H. Kleinfeld, Eng.Sc.D., Columbia 
University; M. Ali Montazer, Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo; Alexis N. 
Sommers, Ph.D., Purdue University; Ronald N. 
Wentworth, Ph.D., Purdue University 

The department of industrial engineering offers 
bachelor of science and associate in science degrees in 
industrial engineering. A master of science in industri- 
al engineering, a master of science in operations 
research and a dual degree program leading to the 
M.B.A./M.S.I.E. are available at the graduate level. 
Graduate certificates in logistics and in quality engi- 
neering are also offered. 

Mission and Educational Objectives 

Tracing its lineage to the creation of the university in 
1920, when one of the two original program offerings 
was called "Industrial Arts," the Department of 
Industrial Engineering defines its mission to be success- 
ful as a premier provider of undergraduate and graduate 
degrees in industrial engineering. This mission includes 
recruiting a diverse student body; providing state-of-the- 
art education; and interacting with employers to insure 
that graduates are ready, willing, and able to contribute 
to their chosen professions in service organizations, man- 
ufacturing, the military, government, transportation, 
commerce, health care and numerous other fields. 

The Department accomplishes its mission by 
preparing industrial engineers, people who engineer 
processes and systems that improve quality and produc- 
tivity in any workplace setting. The program's objectives 
are to produce graduates who: 

• are career ready and capable of pursuing graduate 
studies; 

• can communicate their ideas effectively; 

• can successfully interact with team members and 
others; and 



• are professionally and ethically responsible. 

The industrial engineering department's programs 
combine strong theoretical foundations in science, 
mathematics, probability and statistics, human fac- 
tors/ergonomics, humanities and social sciences with 
industrial engineering and computer applications in 
order to improve effectiveness in virtually all industries 
and economic sectors-including manufacturing, 
transportation, service and government. The depart- 
ment's graduates will be prepared to address issues of 
operational design, process and product quality, meth- 
ods improvement and facilities design. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative edu- 
cation program (Co-op) which enables students to com- 
bine practical, paid work experience in career fields with 
their college education. For further details see "The 
Co-op Program" which appears earlier in the catalog or 
contact the Co-op coordinator in the School of 
Engineering and Applied Science. 

Student Chapter of I. I.E. 

Students are encouraged to join, at a reduced mem- 
bership fee, the student chapter of the Institute of 
Industrial Engineers (I. I.E.). The student chapter is 
affiliated with a local senior chapter of I. I.E., enabling 
students to develop a sense for the practice and direc- 
tion of the profession. 

B.S., Industrial Engineering 

Industrial engineering is one of the most flexible and 
diverse of all engineering disciplines, providing a broad 
view of the complex interrelated activities necessary to 
produce a product or service efficiently in a competitive 
market. Through selection of elective courses, an indus- 
trial engineering student can specialize in a broad range 
of areas applicable to manufacturing and service indus- 
tries, including quality control, ergonomics, work 
design, operations research, production control, facili- 
ties planning, logistics and manufacturing. 

Industrial engineering is concerned with the design, 
evaluation, and improvement of human/machine 
systems, processes and methods considering such factors 



Engineering & Applied Science 125 



as economics, safety, the environment and ethics. The 
skills imparted and insights developed in the graduates 
are intended to be useful for professional practice in a 
wide spectrum of manufacturing industries; in trans- 
portation; in insurance and service industries; in gov- 
ernment, retail trade and commerce. Expertise in indus- 
trial engineering is presently highly sought, as the joint 
concern for productivity and quality improvement is 
manifested throughout the national and global econo- 
my. Industrial engineers are among the most upwardly 
mobile of those in the engineering profession by virtue 
of their training and expertise. Many industrial engi- 
neers have attained top management positions in a vari- 
ety of industries. 

Our program provides a broad engineering back- 
ground during the first two years. In the last two years, 
students are required to take an ensemble of courses 
which are designed to shape the student's expertise in 
industrial engineering. These include courses in man- 
ufacturing, robotics, quality control, production, facil- 
ities planning, operations research, ergonomics and 
simulation modeling. 

The department of industrial engineering has exten- 
sive laboratory facilities in support of its academic 
programs. These include laboratories in human factors/- 
ergonomics, manufacturing engineering, work design, 
facilities planning, computer-aided design and comput- 
er-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM), and robotics. 

The program in industrial engineering is the only 
one of its kind offered in Connecticut. It is accredited 
by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(EAC/ABET). 

Required Courses 

Students earning the bachelor of science in indus- 
trial engineering (B.S.I.E.) must complete 125 credit 
hours including the university core curriculum. The 
program also includes three credit hours of intern- 
ship or a technical elective which is chosen in con- 
sultation with the student's adviser for relevancy and 
content. Internship refers to project work related to 
industrial engineering with local industries. Under 
the umbrella of B.S.I.E., students have the option of 
choosing a concentration in manufacturing systems, 
quality systems, computer systems, or information 



systems. The latter two concentrations consist of 
courses from the electrical and computer engineering 
and computer science programs. The B.S.I.E. cur- 
riculum is as follows: 

Freshman Year 

CH 115 General Chemistry I 

CH 117 General Chemistry I Laboratory 

E 105 Composition 

ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 

M 117 Calculus I 

CH 116 General Chemistry II and CH 1 18 
General Chemistry II Laboratory, or 
BI 121 General and Human Biology I 
with Laboratory 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

M 118 Calculus II 

Plus one computer science elective 

Sophomore Year 

E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation 
IE 204 Engineering Economics 
M 203 Calculus III 
ME 101 Engineering Graphics 
PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with 
Laboratory 

CE 205 Statics and Strength of Materials 
IE 243 Work Design 
M 204 Differential Equations 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 
with Laboratory 

Plus one literature or philosophy elective 

Junior Year 

E 300 Writing Proficiency Examination 

EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

IE 304 Production Control 

IE 346 Probability Analysis 

IE 348 Manufacturing Processes 

Plus one concentration elective 

IE 344 Human Factors Engineering 
IE 347 Statistical Analysis 
ME 204 Dynamics 

Plus one social science elective and 
one concentration elective 



126 



Senior Year 

ES 415 Professional Engineering Seminar 
IE 402 Operations Research 
IE 435 Simulation and Applications 
IE 436 Quality Control 

Plus one art/music/theatre elective and 
one concentration elective 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

IE 414 Engineering Management 

IE 443 Facilities Planning 

IE 498 Internship, or a technical elective 

Plus one concentration elective 

Concentrations 

Students may choose to concentrate in any of the 
following: 

Manufacturing Systems 

IE 437 Metrology and Inspection in 

Manufacturing 
IE 460 Computer-Aided Manufacturing 
IE 465 Robotics in Manufacturing 
ME 200 Engineering Materials 

Quality Systems 

IE 311 Quality Assurance 
IE 407 Reliability and Maintainability 
IE 408 Systems Analysis 
IE 437 Metrology and Inspection in 
Manufacturing 

Computer Systems 

CS 447 Computer Communications 

EE 255 Digital Systems I 

EE 371 Computer Engineering I 

EE 475 Microprocessor Systems 

Information Systems 

CS 226 Data Structures and Algorithms I 

CS 337 File Structures 

CS 437 Database Systems 

CS 478 Artificial Intelligence 

Students who do not wish to adopt a concentration 
will have to complete four 300 or higher level courses 
(totaling at least 12 credits) in industrial engineering. 
In special cases, courses from other engineering disci- 



plines and computer science may be taken with the 
approval of the department chair. 

A.S., Industrial Engineering 

The associate's degree in industrial engineering in- 
cludes about half of the courses required for the bach- 
elor's degree. Students wishing to earn this degree 
should contact the department chairman for up-to- 
date course requirements. Generally, however, the re- 
quirements include the freshman year courses, the 
university core for the associate degree and several des- 
ignated courses in industrial engineering. All courses 
taken for the associate degree are applicable toward the 
bachelor's degree. 

Minor in Industrial Engineering 

Students enrolled in degree programs in the School 
of Engineering and Applied Science may take a minor 
in industrial engineering by completing 18 credit 
hours of industrial engineering courses. The course- 
work for the minor consists of the following required 
and elective courses. 

Required Courses 

IE 243 Work Design 

IE 304 Production Control 

IE 346 Probability Analysis 

IE 347 Statistical Analysis 

Elective Courses 

Two 300 or higher level industrial engineering 
courses (6 credits) chosen with the approval of the stu- 
dent's adviser. 

Logistics Certificate 

Logistics is a discipline which has become critical to 
the efficient development and operational support of 
complex, costly systems. Its subdivisions include cus- 
tomer requirements planning, design-to-cost concepts, 
configuration control, life-cycle analysis, transporta- 
tion and distribution, reliability and field support net- 
works. Modern logistics is the science which ensures 
that needs are met when they occur, at a reasonable 
resource expenditure. UNH offers the following 
undergraduate certificate as well as a graduate certifi- 
cate in logistics. 



Engineering & Applied Science 127 



The undergraduate certificate sequence consists of 
five 3-credit courses followed by a 1 -credit capstone 
logistics seminar. This course sequence provides stu- 
dents with a working knowledge of logistics and covers 
topics included in the Certified Professional Logistician 
examination of the Society of Logistics Engineers. These 
undergraduate-level courses are designed for profession- 
als who either do not hold a college degree or who 
earned degrees in non-technical fields of study. 
Prerequisite courses in mathematics, computer science, 
economics and statistics may be needed by students 
who lack appropriate educational background. 

The six-course series required for the logistics cer- 
tificate includes: 

LG 300 Defense Sector Logistics 

LG 310 Introduction to Logistics Support Analysis 

LG 320 Reliability and Maintainability 

Fundamentals 

LG 4 1 Life Cycle Concepts 

LG 440 Data Management in Logistics Systems 

LG 490 Logistics Seminar 

Department of 
Mechanical Engineering 

Chair: John J. Sarris, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: Thomas C. Warner, Jr., M.S., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Professors: Carl Barratt, Ph.D., University of 
Cambridge; Oleg Faigel, Ph.D., Moscow Textile 
Institute; Konstantine C. Lambrakis, Ph.D., 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Ismail Orabi, 
Ph.D., Clarkson University; Stephen M. Ross, 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; John J. Sarris, 
Ph.D., Tufts University; Richard M. Stanley, 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Assistant Professor: Samuel D. Bogan, Ph.D., 
Boston University 

Mechanical engineering represents a wide diversity 
of pursuits including the analysis, design and testing of 
machines, products and systems essential to everyday 
life-everything from doorknobs, tennis rackets and fish- 
ing reels to power plants, skyscrapers and automobiles. 



Mechanical engineers work in a variety of fields such as 
aerospace, utilities, materials processing, transportation, 
manufacturing, electronics and telecommunications. 

Mission and Goals 

The mission of the mechanical engineering program 
is to graduate professionally competent and responsible 
students who can meet industry's current and fiiture 
needs in the general area of mechanical engineering. 

In order to achieve its mission, the mechanical 
engineering program must ensure that its graduates: 

• apply knowledge in mathematics (through multi- 
variate calculus and differential equations, with 
familiarity in statistics and linear algebra); 

• apply knowledge in science (chemistry and calcu- 
lus-based physics, with depth in physics); 

• apply knowledge in engineering, including the 
formulation and solution of engineering problems; 

• use techniques, skills and tools (contemporary 
analytic, computational and experimental) neces- 
sary for modern engineering practice; 

• design, conduct and analyze results of experiments; 

• actively participate in teams, including multidisci- 
plinary teams; 

• communicate effectively; 

• accomplish design and realization of thermofluid 
and mechanical systems, components and processes; 

• understand professional and ethical ramifications 
of engineering solutions within the context of 
modern society; 

• engage in life-long learning; and 

• succeed in the engineering profession. 

Mechanical engineering classes are kept small 
(rarely more than 20 students) and are taught almost 
exclusively by full-time faculty. Experienced practi- 
tioners from industry also contribute their expertise in 
selected courses. Faculty and students work with 
industry in research and design projects. The 
Alternative Energy Vehicle Project is one that brings 
mechanical and other engineering students together in 
an effort to build and race a nonpolluting, practical, 
low-cost vehicle. 

The B.S.M.E. program has been nationally accred- 
ited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (EAC/ABET) for more than 30 years. 



128 



Several options for concentration are available for a 
student to pursue. Restricted elective courses may be 
selected, with the help of the student's faculty adviser, 
which offer the opportunity for further learning in 
areas such as fluids, energy, design, heat transfer, 
numerical analysis and computers, aerospace sciences 
and control systems. 

Academic Performance 

Mechanical engineering majors who complete their 
first twelve credits of ME-prefixed engineering courses 
with a cumulative average for these courses of less than 
2.0 will have their academic records reviewed by the 
entire ME faculty on a regular basis. An ME-prefixed 
course may not be taken more than twice unless per- 
mission is granted by the department. 

Exceptional students having an overall average of 
3.50 or better may join the Delta Zeta Chapter of the 
Pi Tau Sigma honorary fraternity, which provides the 
opportunity for closer relations with faculty and other 
prominent individuals in the field for the purpose of 
further professional development, involvement in facul- 
ty research and varied social and intellectual activities. 

Practicum 

It is recognized in the mechanical engineering 
department that on-the-job experience as an under- 
graduate student is a valuable tool in launching a 
successful professional career. It is desirable, then, 
for mechanical engineering majors to spend some 
time prior to graduation performing engineering- 
related duties at a manufacturing company, consult- 
ing firm, technical organization, government 
agency, or some other appropriate setting. 

Interns are required to complete a minimum of 
300 hours of practical experience in an area or tech- 
nical project closely related to mechanical engineer- 
ing. The requirement may be satisfied through 
appropriate co-op work experience, part- or full-time 
employment, a summer job, an apprenticeship or 
volunteer work at any time during a student's under- 
graduate studies. Registration, proof of compliance 
or a request for waiver must be submitted to the 
department only after completion of 75 credit hours 
toward the B.S.M.E. degree. The practicum is grad- 
ed on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis and carries 
no academic credit. 



Student Chapter of ASME 

Membership in the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers student section is open to all mechanical 
engineering students of good standing and provides the 
opportunity for field trips to local industrial plants, 
attendance at technical presentations, social activities 
and access to interesting professional literature. 

B.S., Mechanical Engineering 

Required Courses 

Students earning the bachelor of science in mechan- 
ical engineering are required to complete 127 credit 
hours, including the university core curriculum. 

Freshman 

In addition to the common first-year courses listed 
under the School of Engineering and Applied Science, 
mechanical engineering students take PH 150 
Mechanics, Heat and Waves with Laboratory for the lab- 
oratory science course plus the Mechanical Engineering 
Skills Workshop. This one hour per week workshop 
familiarizes mechanical engineering students with basic 
practices in a laboratory environment including safety 
considerations, design planning, layout, fabrication, and 
the use of basic measuring equipment and devices to test 
and verify a design. The workshop is offered in the 
Spring semester and is graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatis- 
factory basis. The workshop carries no academic credit. 

Sophomore 

CE 205 Statics and Strength of Materials 

E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation 

EE 201 Introduction to Electrical Circuits 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 

M 203 Calculus III 

M 204 Differential Equations 

ME 101 Engineering Graphics 

ME 200 Engineering Materials 

ME 204 Dynamics 

ME 215 Instrumentation Laboratory 

PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 
with Laboratory 



Junior 

EE 212 
HS 102 



Principles of Electrical Engineering 
The Western World in Modern Times 



Engineering & Applied Science 129 



ME 301-302 Thermodynamics I and II 

ME 307 Solid Mechanics 

ME 315 Mechanics Laboratory 

ME 321 Incompressible Fluid Flow 

ME 330 Fundamentals of Mechanical 

Design (D) 

ME 344 Mechanics of Vibration 

Plus 3 credit hours of a humanities elective 
and 300 hours of practicum 

Senior 

ES 415 Professional Engineering Seminar 

ME 404 Heat and Mass Transfer 

ME 415 Thermo/Fluids Laboratory 

ME 422 Compressible Fluid Flow 

ME 431-432 Mechanical Engineering Design I (D) 
and II (D) 

Plus 3 credit hours of a math (300 level or higher) or 
science (biology, chemistry or a 200 level or high- 
er course in physics) elective; 3 credit hours of a 
design elective (D-designated ME course); 3 credit 
hours of a technical elective*; 3 credit hours of an 
engineering/mathematics analysis elective*; 6 cred- 
it hours of humanities/social science electives.* 

* Must be chosen in consultation with the 
students adviser. 

The B.S.M.E. program as previously described 
includes two required stems of coherent course offer- 
ings: 1) Thermo/Fluid Systems, comprising ME 301, 
ME 302, ME 321, ME 404, ME 415, ME 422 (17 
credits) and 2) Mechanical Systems, comprising ME 
200, ME 204, ME 307, ME 315, ME 330, ME 344 



(17 credits). It should be noted that the required cap- 
stone design sequence ME 431- 432 (6 credits) may be 
taken in either one of the above stems. Also, technical 
and design electives are offered periodically in both 
thermo/fluid and mechanical systems; and the 
practicum experience could be in either one or both of 
these areas. 

A.S., Mechanical Engineering 

The associate's degree in mechanical engineering is 
not designed to be a terminal degree. It simply provides 
formal evidence that the student has completed about 
one-half of the bachelor's program. Students wishing to 
earn this degree must complete the first four semesters 
of the B.S.M.E. program. In the fourth semester EE 
201 and M 204 are replaced by HS 102 and a human- 
ities elective. All courses taken for the associate's degree 
are applicable toward the bachelor's degree. 

Minor in Mechanical Engineering 

Students wishing to minor in mechanical engineer- 
ing must complete the following courses with a mini- 
mum QPR of 2.0. 

ME 101 Engineering Graphics 

ME 204 Dynamics 

ME 301 Thermodynamics I 

Plus three courses among the 300- or 400- level ME 
courses. Students with general interest in 
mechanical engineering are advised to select ME 
321, ME 330 and ME 344 . 



130 



THE TAGLIATELA SCHOOL OF 
HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 



Caroline A. Dinegar, Ph.D., Program Director 
William B. Williams, III, M.S., Associate Dean 

Purpose 

The Tagliatela School of HospitaUty and Tourism 
offers courses and programs in four fields: Hotel and 
Restaurant Management, Private Club Management, 
Tourism Administration, and Gastronomy and 
Culinary Arts. 

These programs are an integral part of the Tagliatela 
School of Hospitality and Tourism. The Tagliatela fam- 
ily has been associated with excellence in hospitality 
throughout the State of Connecticut. As owners of the 
prestigious Old Saybrook Point Inn, a perennial Four- 
Star resort, they represent the finest standards in the 
hospitality profession. The University of New Haven 
and the Tagliatela family invite you to participate in 
these challenging and rewarding programs. 

The school is dedicated to academic excellence 
through study, teaching and research in the fields of 
hospitality within a global framework. 

The school provides a strong foundation for pro- 
fessional careers and seeks to prepare graduates for 
leadership, professional excellence and life-long learn- 
ing. In accordance with the University of New Haven's 
mission, the curriculum is designed to strengthen the 
student's ability to manage, to communicate and to 
reason in a diverse and complex workplace. Graduates 
of the school furnish the managerial talent needed by 
hotels, resorts, spas, private clubs, restaurants, govern- 
mental tourism agencies, destination management 
firms and corporate travel companies. 

Our students are educated to think; to make deci- 
sions; to solve problems; to be creative, flexible, com- 
mitted and passionate; and to see change as an oppor- 
tunity and not as a threat. Such skills create a desire 
within people to achieve, to lead and to find new solu- 
tions to old problems. 

The school's programs provide three key elements: 
substantive knowledge essential to the profession, 
skills and abilities necessary to apply professional 
knowledge to the field, and values relevant to life-long 
success in the profession. 



Undergraduate Programs 

Bachelor of Science 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

with Tourism Concentration 
Tourism Administration 

Associate in Science 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Certificates 

Culinary Arts and Gastronomy 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Graduate Program 

Master of Science in Hospitality and Tourism 



Proposed Degree Programs 2003-2004 

Bachelor of Science 

Culinary Arts and Gastronomy 

Private Club Management 
Tourism 

Associate of Science 

Culinary Arts and Gastronomy 
Tourism 



Academic Policies 

All required courses, including the university core 
curriculum, must be completed, and courses identified 
as the "major courses" must be completed with a grade 
of C (2.0) or better. Failure to achieve the grade 
requirement will result in the necessity for the student 
to repeat the course in a future semester. Although the 
school offers summer courses, students should not rely 
on summer courses to meet graduation requirements. 

To assure students' academic success they are 
required to maintain a cumulative quality point ratio 
(QPR) of 2.50 or higher. Failure to demonstrate satis- 
factory progress toward a degree in the Tagliatela School 
of Hospitality and Tourism will cause a student to be 



131 



placed on probation or suspended. If the QPR is not 
elevated to 2.50 by the end of the following full semes- 
ter (spring/fall) a student will be suspended from the 
School of Hospitality and Tourism for one semester. 

Experiential Policies 

The Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism is 
committed to providing a holistic, student-focused, 
educational environment in which future hospitality 
leaders can develop. Excellence in academic prepara- 
tion is strengthened by the school's innovative 
approach to engaged learning through practicum, 
internship and cooperative education experiences. The 
school has established professional partnerships with 
leading industry corporations/entrepreneurs to pro- 
vide professional development opportunities for stu- 
dents as part of their undergraduate studies. Therefore, 
in addition to the academic requirements, the 
Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism requires 
1200 hours of acceptable work experience/employ- 
ment in the hospitality industry. This field experience 
will be evaluated qualitatively as well as quantitatively 
and must be consistent with the student's career aspi- 
rations. The field experience requirement may be sat- 
isfied during the school year or in summers. 
International students may apply for work permits 
after completing nine months ol full-time study at the 
University of New Haven. 

Practicum 

The practicum experiences require the students to 
successfully complete 600 hours of professional expe- 
rience for an associate's degree and 1000 hours of pro- 
fessional experience for the bachelor's degree. The field 
experience requirement (400 A.S./800 B.S.) requires 
the student to secure a paid position, with an approved 
employer, in a location of the student's choice and car- 
ries no academic credit. The community service 
requirement (100 A.S/200 B.S.) requires students to 
engage in service learning and leadership initiatives. 
Students will develop and coordinate community serv- 
ice programs of their choice throughout their tenure as 
an undergraduate student. The practicum will require 
an assessment by the supervisor and a student 
report/business plan on the activity. 



Internship 

The internship requirement (400 hours for a B.S.) 



is an approved and supervised experience and is valued 
at three academic credits. Students participate in an 
internship experience after having completed the 
required coursework and prior to graduation. The 
internship consists of a full-time position (40 hours 
per week) for a minimum of 10 weeks at an approved 
site. Ordinarily, students are not permitted to take 
additional courses or be employed outside the intern- 
ship experience. The internship must take place in a 
setting that is related to the degree and major area of 
emphasis and the career goals of the student and 
agreed to by the major advisor. Credentialed faculty 
under the direction of the Associate Dean will admin- 
ister the internship. 

An internship is included in the program for sever- 
al reasons. The internship serves as an integral compo- 
nent of the formal education process. This experience, 
following academic course work, provides the practical 
experiences for the student entering the hospitality 
and tourism industry. Entry into the hotel, restaurant, 
culinary, private club or tourism fields requires quali- 
fied experience on the part of the applicant. The 
internship often serves as a stepping-stone to employ- 
ment and assists the student in networking with pro- 
fessionals in the field that may lead to employment 
opportunities immediately or at a later date. 

Student Professional Organizations 

Students are strongly encouraged to seek opportuni- 
ties to develop professionally beyond the formal struc- 
ture of academic requirements. The Tagliatela School of 
Hospitality and Tourism supports the student's profes- 
sional development by affiliating with national societies 
and associations. A student membership in extra-curric- 
ular activities provides a rubric for networking, leader- 
ship development and self-motivated improvement. The 
school's primary organization — the Hospitality, Tourism 
and Culinary Students Association — provides numerous 
special interest sections to facilitate the broad expecta- 
tions of an international student population. In addi- 
tion, hospitality students are encouraged to seek other 
leadership positions here on campus and contribute as a 
citizen to the surrounding municipal communities. 

Eta Sigma Delta Honor Society 

Eta Sigma Delta is a local UNH chapter of a national 
society that recognizes hospitality, tourism and culinary 
arts students for outstanding academic achievement, 
meritorious service and demonstrated professionalism. To 



Hospitality & Tourism 132 



be eligible for membership a student must be officially 
declared as a hospitality major, have completed 50% of 
the credit hours required for graduation, have completed 
at least one year of course work at the University of New 
Haven and have a minimum 3.2 cumulative QPR. 
Inducted students are encouraged to participate in com- 
munity and imiversity service activities. 

Placement 

Students in the Tagliatela School of Hospitality and 
Tourism may receive help in finding a position in their 
chosen field. Through attendance and participation in 
seminars, lectures and industry conventions, students 
have an opportunity to meet interesting and impor- 
tant people in the field who are colleagues of the fac- 
ulty. In addition, the Career Development Office is an 
active placement bureau helping students to obtain 
hospitality-related positions during the academic year 
as well as assisting with pursuit of permanent positions 
at the time of graduation. The faculty of the Tagliatela 
School of Hospitality and Tourism are also available 
for career counseling. 

Admission Criteria 

An applicant for admission to a program in the 
Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism must have 
graduated, or anticipate graduation, from an approved 
secondary school or the equivalent. While no specific 
high school academic program is prescribed, an appli- 
cant must meet the standard of the university's entrance 
requirements. Applicants must present at least 15 
acceptable units of satisfactory work, including nine or 
more units of college preparatory subjects. 

Transfer Credits 

The Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism 
accepts transfer credits that meet established university 
criteria from regionally accredited junior and/or com- 
munity colleges, four-year baccalaureate institutions or 
approved professional schools in the hospitality field. 

The University Core Curriculum 

In addition to departmental requirements, students 
must fulfill all requirements of the university core cur- 
riculum. For further details on these requirements, see 
information listed earlier in this catalog. 



Hotel and Restaurant 
Management 

Chair: C.E. Vlisides, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors: C.E. Vlisides, Ph.D., 

University of Texas; William B. Williams, III, 
M.S., University of New Haven 

Assistant Professor: Patrick B. Rowland, M.S., 
University of New Haven; CPA 

The program in hotel and restaurant management is 
an integral part of the Tagliatela School of Hospitality 
and Tourism. The department includes among its teach- 
ing stafi^ a number of successfiil members of the indus- 
try who contribute their expertise in the classroom. 
These experts include Michael Schaffer, owner of four 
lodging operations in the Greater New Haven area, and 
David Jurcak, the General Manager of the Omni Hotel, 
a Four-Star hotel property in New Haven. 

To those individuals who enjoy interacting with 
many diverse people, who seek a continuous challenge, 
and who thrive on details and deadlines, a career in 
hotel and restaurant management offers a variety of 
professional, personal and financial rewards. 

The focus of the program's curriculum is on the 
development of managerial skills, abilities and compe- 
tencies essential to all hospitality managers. The cur- 
riculum combines contemporary and realistic tech- 
niques. Students will learn to communicate, to lead 
and to adapt in a multicultural environment. The 
diversified knowledge necessary for the management 
and operation of the modern lodging or restaurant 
operation requires an educational background that is 
grounded in both theory and application. The hotel 
and restaurant curriculum at UNH is designed to per- 
mit classroom theory to be applied in various hospi- 
tality settings. 

The mixture of courses is designed to provide a 
broad industry overview, as well as allow the student to 
specialize in operational areas. To ensure hotel and 
restaurant majors are well-grounded academically for a 
career and for life-long learning, the curriculum has 
been designed to build on the university's core cur- 
riculum liberal studies. 

The hospitality industry demands that graduates of 
hotel and restaurant programs understand the needs of 
guests and are able to provide a personal service orien- 
tation in a global marketplace. 



133 



B.S., Hotel and Restaurant Management 

The programs in this disciphne center on conceptu- 
al and technical knowledge required in the leadership 
and management of modern hotels, motels and restau- 
rants. The program emphasizes interpersonal commu- 
nication skills, critical analysis, flexibility and creativity 
from the perspective of the manager of operations. 

A student earning a bachelor of science degree in 
hotel and restaurant management will develop those 
skills, abilities and competencies essential to all hospital- 
ity leaders and managers. Students must complete 40 
courses equaling 121 credit hours, a 1000-hour 
practicum and 400 hours of internship in the industry. 

Since every aspect of the hospitality industry is 
involved with or depends on people, students are 
required to enroll in courses on human resources man- 
agement and supervisory leadership. 

With the advent of new technology, new and inno- 
vative private and non-profit operations, changing 
expectations of guests, the shifting demography of the 
workforce and the globalization of our industry, today's 
students must be able to recognize and adjust to change. 
Upperclass courses, particularly those in hospitality 
research and marketing, form the management 
approach to meet the changes and challenges of the next 
century. 

Required Courses 

HR 165 Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality 
HR 200 Classical Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
HR 210 Applied Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
HR 226 Front Office Procedures 
HR 227 Guest Services Management 

HR 228 Human Resource Management for the 
Hospitality and Tourism Industry 

HR 235 Dining Room Management 

HR 250 Lodging Operations 

HR 280 Legal Aspects of Hospitality, Tourism 

and Private Clubs 
HR315 Beverage Management 
HR321 Hospitality Accounting 
HR 322 Marketing for Tourism, Hospitality 

and Private Clubs 
HR 330 Hospitality Property Management 
HR 400 Leadership Theory for Hospitality and 

Tourism Professionals 

HR 41 1 Hospitality and Institutional Layout 

and Design 
HR 501 Leadership Applications in Hospitality, 



Tourism and Private Clubs 
HR 516 Advanced Financial Management and 

Policy Analysis for Hospitality and Tourism 

Plus eight electives chosen in consultation with adviser 

Concentration in Tourism 

TA 166 Touristic Geography 

TA 335 Convention and Meeting Planning 

TA 345 Tourism Economics 

TA 450 Tourism Dimensions in Contemporary 
Society 

A.S., Hotel and Restaurant Management 

The A.S. program was designed using a selection 
of courses from the B.S. program that will provide 
two-year students requisite knowledge and skills 
needed for entry-level supervisory positions in the 
hotel and restaurant management career field. A 
two-year student can easily continue in the four-year 
B.S. program because all the courses in the two-year 
program are in the four-year program. For those 
students not continuing in the four-year program, 
the two-year program provides a sound foundation in 
hospitality theory and application. Students must 
complete 30 credits of hospitality/tourism courses 
and a total of 60 university credits in addition to the 
600-hour industry practicum. 

Required Courses 

HR 165 Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality 
HR 200 Classical Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
HR 210 Applied Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
HR 228 Human Resource Management 

for the Hospitality and Tourism Industry 
HR 250 Lodging Operations 
HR 304 Volume Food Production and Service 
HR321 Hospitality Accounting 
HR 322 Marketing for Tourism, Hospitality 

and Private Clubs 
HR 330 Hospitality Property Management 
TA 166 Touristic Geography - 

The Western Hemisphere 

Plus three electives 

Hotel & Restaurant Management Certificate 

The department oilers a nontraditional certificate 
in Hotel and a Restaurant Management. No prior 



Hospitality & Tourism 134 



experience is necessary. This 12-credit certificate is a 
flexible part-time program. The coursework requires 
an in-class time commitment of three to six hours per 
week. 

Like the curriculum of the A.S. and B.S. degree 
programs, each course integrates practical and class- 
room applications. The 12 college credits earned for 
the certificate may be applied toward an associate's or 
bachelor's degree. For more information, on required 
coursework contact the School of Hospitality and 
Tourism. 

B.S., Private Club Management 



The University of New Haven's Tagliatela School of 
Hospitality and Tourism proudly unveils the first bac- 
calaureate degree in Private Club Management within 
the United States. The degree program will com- 
mence in the 2003 -2004 academic year. 
Accreditation and licensing application to the Board of 
Governors for Higher Education, State of 
Connecticut, for the bachelor of science degree pro- 
gram in private club management is in process at the 
time of catalog printing. 



The University of New Haven's Tagliatela School of 
Hospitality and Tourism proudly introduces the Bauer 
Private Club Management baccalaureate degree pro- 
gram, the first of its kind in the United States. This 
unique program will be named in honor of Mr. Carl 
Bauer, the General Manager at Mory's, Yale 
University's private undergraduate club in New 
Haven, Connecticut. The Club Manager's Association 
of America (CMAA) recognizes Mr. Bauer as a 
Certified Club Manager and future Hall of Fame Club 
Manager. 

The program will place strong emphasis on intrap- 
ersonal skills and committee/club management rela- 
tions. Other areas of personal skill building for the 
successful student include legal, fiscal, leadership and 
marketing skills oriented toward club management. 
This stimulating and challenging course of study also 
stresses development of ecological, personal and/or 
family recreational and fitness programs and their inte- 
gral relationship for club members. Life-long learning 
is a unique private club management hallmark that 
begins with the bachelor's degree. 

The specialized coursework in private club manage- 
ment will center on the core competency as endorsed 
by the Club Managers Association of America 
(CCMA). This coursework, taught by knowledgeable 
faculty who are experienced in the field, is combined 



with a unique 1400-hour internship. 

The progressive internship experiences provide the 
undergraduate student with the necessary hands-on 
training, operational acumen and human relations 
skills that should assure the students success in this 
hospitality discipline speciality. 

There are over 400 clubs within a 150-mile radius 
of the University of New Haven's campus. Due to the 
proximity of these prestigious clubs, internships, coop- 
erative programs and employment opportunities 
abound for those students who aspire to a career in the 
club professions. 

Required Courses 

PCM 220 Introduction to the Private Club Industry 
PCM 250 Lodging Operations for the 

Private Club Industry 
PCM 280 Legal Aspects of Hospitality, Tourism 

and Clubs 
PCM 322 Marketing for Tourism, Hospitality 

and Private Clubs 
PCM 330 Private Club Renovation and 

Property Management 
PCM 345 Catering, Meetings and Event Planning 

for the Private Club Industry 
PCM 380 Recreation and Fitness Facilities 

Management for Private Clubs 
PCM 385 Environmental Resources and Conserva- 
tion for Club and Recreation Managers 
PCM 410 Taxes, Public Policy and Advanced Fiscal 

Management for the Club Industry 

PCM 4 1 5 Management of Real Estate, Construction 
and Renovation for the Club Industry 

PCM 501 Leadership Applications in Hospitality, 
Tourism and Private Clubs 

PCM 510 Internship in the Private Club Industry 

Tourism Administration 

Chair: Elisabeth van Dyke, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: Elisabeth van Dyke, Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Assistant Professor: James J. Murdy, Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

The University of New Haven's Tagliatela School of 
Hospitality and Tourism proudly presents the only 
associate or baccalaureate degree programs in the field 



135 



of Tourism within the state of Connecticut. 



The degree program will commence in the 2003-2004 
academic year. Accreditation and licensing application 
to the Board of Governors for Higher Education, State 
of Connecticut, for the bachelor of science and associ- 
ate in science degree programs in tourism is in process 
at the time of catalog printing. 



As tourism continues to be a major factor in the 
economy of many nations, there is a growing need for 
expert professionals and consultants who can provide 
in-depth guidance and direction for this rapidly 
expanding industry. Travel and tourism may indeed be 
the world's largest industry today, accounting for con- 
siderable percentages of the global domestic product, 
capital investment and consumer spending worldwide. 

Located between New York and Boston, two of the 
most prominent U.S. tourist gateways, the University 
of New Haven offers students a unique vantage point 
from which to study tourism. 

Tourism as a profession requires a knowledge of fields 
such as economics, finance, accounting, marketing, 
planning and policy development. Career possibilities in 
tourism include employment at tourist attractions 
and/or resorts; convention, meeting and special event 
management; marketing and sales of travel services; 
administration of governmental tourism agencies; gov- 
ernmental and private tourism planning organizations; 
and international and national tourism associations. 

Recognizing that education extends beyond the 
classroom, all tourism majors will complete 1400 
hours of work experience by doing 1000 hours of 
practicum and 400 hours of internship. Professional 
internships are an elective means of obtaining addi- 
tional quality work experience. 

B.S., Tourism Administration 

The program will present a balanced tourism cur- 
riculum with management skills, leadership and 
human resource management as well as tourism eco- 
nomics, planning and marketing. Global orientations 
are provided in courses covering international relations 
and international law, organization and business. 
Class-room theory is complemented by other learning 
opportunities including guest lectures and field trips 
to conventions, trade shows and professional meet- 
ings. Moreover, as conditions allow, students are given 
opportunities to work on professional projects and 
leadership development initiatives. This provides 
excellent work experience and exposure to area 



tourism professionals at the local, state, regional and 
national level. 

The B.S. degree in tourism administration will 
provide students with the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to compete for entry-level management and the 
orientation of the curriculum also enables graduates to 
secure upward mobility. 

Required Courses 

A student earning a bachelor of science degree in 
tourism administration must complete 121 credit 
hours, 1000 hours practicum and 400 hours of intern- 
ship. Most students complete the practicum require- 
ment through summer employment. 

In addition to the university core curriculum and 
other supportive management courses taught by other 
departments in the university, students must take the 
following tourism major courses: 

TA 165 Introduction to Tourism 
TA 1 66 Touristic Geography I — 

The Western Hemisphere 
TA 167 Touristic Geography II — 

The Eastern Hemisphere 
TA 228 Human Resource Management for the 

Hospitality and Tourism Industry 

TA 260 Transportation Systems I — 
Air, Rail and Vehicular 

TA 261 Transportations Systems II — 

Shipping and Cruising 
TA 275 Connecticut Tourism in the 21st Century 
TA 280 Legal Aspects of Hospitality, 

Tourism and Clubs 
TA 322 Marketing for Tourism, Hospitality 

and Private Clubs 
TA 335 Convention and Meeting Planning 
TA 340 Tourism Planning and Policy 
TA 345 Tourism Economics 
TA 370 Tourism and the Gaming Industry 
TA 420 The Impact of Tourism on 

the International System 
TA 430 Special Interest and Adventure Tourism 
TA 445 Cultural Heritage Tourism 
TA 450 Tourism Dimensions in 

Contemporary Society 
TA 470 Tour Design, Marketing and Management 
HR 501 Leadership Applications in Hospitality, 

Tourism and Private Clubs 
TA510 Internship 
Plus six electives 

Plus Foreign Language I & II 



Hospitality & Tourism 136 



UNH leaders and Tagliatela School of Hospitality 
and Tourism faculty are proud to acknowledge the 
UNH partnership program with the International 
College of Hospitality Management (ICHM). This 
unique program allows students enrolled at any of the 
Cesar Ritz Colleges (ICHM) — located in Switzerland, 
Australia and Connecticut — to pursue an accelerated 
bachelor's degree in conjunction with the University of 
New Haven's Tagliatela School of Hospitality and 
Tourism. 

A.S., Tourism Administration 

The associate degree program will deliver content 
needed to become an entry-level supervisor in the field 
of tourism. A student pursuing this degree may easily 
continue into the four-year program because all of the 
courses necessary to obtain the two-year diploma are 
also required for the bachelor of science in tourism 
administration. For students choosing not to continue 
in the bachelor's program', the associate degree will pro- 
vide a sound foundation in the fiinctional areas of 
tourism. Students must complete 30 credits of tourism 
courses and a total of 60 credit hours, as well as a 600- 
hour industry practicum. Students are required to take 
the following courses in the major plus the university 
core curriculum for the associate degree. 

Required Courses 

TA 165 Introduction to Tourism 
TA 1 66 Touristic Geography I - 

The Western Hemisphere 
TA 167 Touristic Geography II - 

The Eastern Hemisphere 
TA 228 Human Resource Management for the 

Hospitality and Tourism Industry 

TA 260 Transportation Systems I - 
Air, Rail and Vehicular 

TA 261 Transportation Systems II — 

Shipping and Cruising 
TA 275 Connecticut Tourism in the 21st Century 
TA 280 Legal Aspects of Hospitality, Tourism 

and Clubs 
TA 322 Marketing for Tourism, Hospitality 

and Clubs 
TA 335 Convention and Meeting Planning 



Culinary Arts and 
Gastronomy 

Chair and Chef-in-Residence: Patrick Boisjot, 
Professional baccalaureate, Lyceum Hotelier de 
Thonon-les-Bains, France; B.S., State University 
of New York, Empire State College 



The University of New Haven's Tagliatela School of 
Hospitality and Tourism proudly unveils one of the 
only baccalaureate degree programs in the world fea- 
turing Gastronomy as a form of academic preparation. 
The degree program will commence in the 2003-2004 
academic year. Accreditation and licensing application 
to the Board of Governors for Higher Education, State 
of Connecticut, for the bachelor of science and associ- 
ate in science degree programs in culinary arts and gas- 
tronomy is in the process at the time of catalog printing. 



The culinary arts department will offer new associ- 
ate's and bachelor's degree programs in the disciplines 
of culinary arts and gastronomy. As the only four-year, 
accredited institution offering a program in this field 
within the State of Connecticut, UNH will prepare 
students for excellent career opportunities upon com- 
pletion of this exciting and challenging curriculum. 

This innovative program approach will integrate 
elements of science, art and business principles in a 
classical, professional culinary setting. The hands-on 
experience gained within the classroom is easily trans- 
ferred to an industry seeking professionals with this 
type of knowledge. Classical cooking techniques are 
blended with cultural, historical, political and social 
studies as they apply to the culinary and gastronomic 
experiences created for students under the expert guid- 
ance of industry-tested professionals. 

The successfiil student will enjoy practical experi- 
ences from internship programs that underscore and 
validate classroom studies. The culinary arts and gas- 
tronomy program is affiliated with the American 
Culinary Federation (ACF) and other respected pro- 
fessional organizations. 

The new associate and baccalaureate degree pro- 
grams will be merged with the successful Institute of 
Gastronomy and Culinary Arts, which has been an 
independent unit at UNH. The Institute will now be 
a critical part of the academic structure ot the 
Tagliatela School of Hospitality and Tourism. 
Featured among its offerings are a 1 2-credit certificate 
in basic techniques and theories of cooking and other 
Institute programs and events designed not only for 



137 



UNH students earning academic credits but also for 
food writers, restaurant owners and hobbyist cooks. 

B.S., Culinary Arts and Gastronomy 

This will be the only four-year baccalaureate degree 
program in culinary arts accredited by the State of 
Connecticut. As such it provides a natural bridge for 
culinary students and food enthusiasts to continue 
their formal educational preparation beyond the asso- 
ciate degree studies available at many two-year culi- 
nary programs. The program will integrate elements 
of science, art and business in a hands-on environ- 
ment. Students will learn classical professional cook- 
ing techniques and gastronomy, the study of food in 
the context of society. The program will combine cul- 
tural, political and social studies through the thematic 
lens of food. This program in culinary arts and gas- 
tronomy re-establishes UNH's historic position as a 
center for culinary excellence. 

A student earning a bachelor's degree in culinary 
arts and gastronomy must complete 121 credit hours, 
1000 hours of practicum and 400 hours of internship. 
Most students complete the practicum requirement 
through summer employment. 

In addition to the university core curriculum and 
other supportive management courses taught by other 
departments in the university, students must take the 
following major courses: 

Required Courses 

CA 200 Classical Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
CA 210 Applied Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
CA 220 Pastry Making Techniques 
CA 228 Human Resource Theory for the 

Hospitality and Tourism Industry 
CA 235 Dining Room Management 
CA 300 Principles of Baking 
CA 304 Volume Food Production and Service 
CA 307 Cultural Understanding of Food and Cuisine 
CA 345 Catering and Events Management 
CA 440 International Food, Buffet and Catering 
CA 450 Advanced Cuisine Management 

and Technique 

A.S., Culinary Arts and Gastronomy 

The associate's degree will accommodate those 
individuals wishing to advance their study of food 
beyond the certificate level and will provide the neces- 
sary preparation for a successful career in the culinary 



field or advanced study at the baccalaureate level. A 
student pursuing this degree may easily continue into 
the four-year program. Students must complete 30 
credits of courses and a total of 60 credits at the 
University, as well as a 600-hour industry practicum. 
Students are required to take the following courses in 
the major plus the university core curriculum for the 
associate degree. 

Required Courses 

CA 200 Classical Techniques in the Culinary Arts 

CA 210 Applied Techniques in the Culinary Arts 

CA 220 Pastry Making Techniques 

CA 235 Dining Room Management 

CA 300 Principles of Baking 

CA 304 Volume Food Production 

CA 345 Catering and Events Management 

Accreditation and licensing application to the 
Board of Governors for Higher Education, State of 
Connecticut, for these bachelor of science and associ- 
ate in science degree programs in culinary arts and gas- 
tronomy is in process at the time of catalog printing. 

Certificate Program 

This 12-credit certificate is a flexible part-time pro- 
gram consisting of four courses. No prior experience is 
necessary. As a part-time student, the coursework 
requires an in-class time commitment of three to six 
hours per week. 

Like the curriculum of the A.S. and B.S. degree 
programs, each course integrates practical and class- 
room applications. The 12 college credits earned for 
the certificate may be applied toward an associate's or 
bachelor's degree. 

Required Courses 

CA 200 Classical Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
HR 450 Advanced Cuisine Management 
and Technique* 

Plus two of the following elective courses: 

CA 210 Applied Techniques in the Culinary Arts 
CA 304 Volume Food Production and Services 
CA 307 Cultural Understanding of 

Food and Cuisine 
HR 492 Special Topics: Professional Pastry Making 

*Note that prerequisites for HR 450 are 
CA200andCA210 



138 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SAFETY 
AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 



Thomas A. Johnson, D.Crim., Dean 

WiUiam M. Norton, Ph.D., J.D., Associate Dean 

The School of Public Safety and Professional Studies 
provides educational services for students who wish to 
major in degree programs specifically oriented toward 
career paths in aviation, occupational safety and health, 
criminal justice, forensic science, fire science and arson 
investigation, corrections, paralegal studies and related 
programs. The school provides a broad professional 
education which often incorporates classroom learning 
with laboratory and field experience. The school attracts 
students of varied ages and levels of experience, from 
recent high school graduates to seasoned industry pro- 
fessionals. It also services professionals seeking programs 
designed to meet requirements of national and/or 
regional accreditations and licensures. 

Graduate degree programs and certificates are avail- 
able in various disciplines through the Graduate School. 

Programs and Concentrations 

Bachelor of Science 

Air Transportation Management 

Criminal Justice 
Corrections 
Investigative Services 
Juvenile and Family Justice 
Law Enforcement Administration 
Private Security 

Research and Program Evaluation 
Victim Services Administration 

Fire Science 

Fire/Arson Investigation 
Fire Administration 
Fire Science Technology 

Fire Protection Engineering 
Forensic Science 
Legal Studies 



Legal Assistant 
Public Affairs 
Dispute Resolution 

Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration 

Occupational Safety and Health Technology 

Associate in Science 

Aviation Science 

Criminal Justice 

Fire and Occupational Safety 

Legal Studies 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration 

Occupational Safety and Health Technology 

Certificates 

Fire/ Arson Investigation 

Fire Prevention 

Forensic Computer Investigation 

Hazardous Materials 

Industrial Fire Protection 

Information Protection and Security 

Law Enforcement Science 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Paralegal Studies 

Private Security 

Victim Services Administration 

Graduate Programs 

Master of Science 

Criminal Justice 

Fire Science 

Forensic Science 

Industrial Hygiene 

Occupational Safety and Health Management 

Graduate Certificates 

Arson Investigation 

Criminal Justice/Security Management 



139 



Fire Science/ Administration and Technology 

Forensic Science/ Advanced Investigation 

Forensic Science/Criminalistics 

Forensic Science/Fire Science 

Forensic Computer Investigation 

Industrial Hygiene 

Information Protection and Security 

Occupational Safety 

Public Safety Management 

Department of 
Criminal Justice 

Chair: Lynn Hunt Monahan, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus: David A. Maxwell, J.D., 
University of Miami, C.P.P. 

Professors: Thomas A. Johnson, D.Crim., University 
of California, Berkeley; Henry C. Lee, Ph.D., 
New York University; William M. Norton, Ph.D., 
Florida State University; J.D., University of 
Connecticut; L. Craig Parker, Jr., Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo; Gerald D. 
Robin, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Associate Professors: Peter Bilous, Ph.D., McGill 
University; Mario T Gaboury, Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University, J.D., Georgetown University; 
Howard A. Harris, Ph.D., Yale University, J.D., 
St. Louis University; Lynn Hunt Monahan, 
Ph.D., University of Oregon; James Monahan, 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

Associate Research Professor: Gregory Saville, 
M.E.S., York University 

Assistant Professors: James M. Adcock, Ph.D., 
University of South Carolina; The Hon. Michael 
P. Lawlor, J.D., George Washington University, 
Connecticut state representative; Marilyn T. 
Miller, M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Donna 
Decker Morris, J.D., Yale University 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Charles Genre, M.S., 
Florida State University 

Practitioners-in-Residence: William H. Carbone, 
M.P.A., University of New Haven, director of 



alternative sanctions. State of Connecticut; 
Joseph DeVito, Ph.D., Georgia State University; 
The Hon. Martin Looney, J.D., University of 
Connecticut; Joseph R. Polio, M.S., University 
of New Haven; Leonard Rubin, Ph.D., SUNY at 
Stony Brook; George Wezner, M.S., Rennesalaer 
Polytechnic Institute 

Criminal Justice 

Coordinator of Corrections: 

Lynn Hunt Monahan, Ph.D. 
Coordinator of Investigative Services: 

James M. Adcock, Ph.D. 
Coordinator of Juvenile and Family Justice: 

Lynn Hunt Monahan, Ph.D. 
Coordinator of Law Enforcement Administration: 

William M. Norton, Ph.D., J.D. 
Coordinator of Private Security: 

William M. Norton, Ph.D., J.D. 
Coordinator of Victim Services Administration: 

Mario T. Gaboury, Ph.D., J.D. 
Coordinator of Research and Program Evaluation: 

James Monahan, Ph.D. 

The criminal justice system is a formal mechanism 
of control through which social order is maintained. 
The study of this system is approached in an interdis- 
ciplinary manner involving law, the physical sciences 
and the social sciences. Through the use of both con- 
ventional and innovative techniques, including lec- 
tures, written assignments, seminars, workshops, 
internships and independent research and study, an 
attempt is made to provide students with the opportu- 
nity to gain a wide variety of insights and experiences. 

There is a full range of career opportunities available 
in criminal justice at the local, state and national levels. 
Because of its interdisciplinary approach, the study of 
criminal justice fills the needs of students seeking careers 
in teaching, research and law, and of inservice personnel 
seeking academic and professional advancement. 

The department offers courses from the associate's to 
the master's level as well as certificates. Complete infor- 
mation about the master of science degrees in criminal 
justice and in forensic science and the graduate certifi- 
cates is available in the Graduate School catalog. 



Public Safety & Professional Studies 140 



Undergraduate criminal justice concentrations in 
law enforcement administration, corrections, law 
enforcement science, juvenile and family justice, vic- 
tim services administration and private security are 
available in the criminal justice program. A separate 
program is offered in forensic science. 

The Criminal Justice Club 

The American Criminal Justice Association (ACJA) 
is a national professional and preprofessional organiza- 
tion with goals that include improved technology, 
training and service for the benefit of the criminal jus- 
tice system. UNH's local student chapter of ACJA is 
the Psi Omega chapter. This club offers students a 
variety of activities including community service as 
well as the opportunity to meet and work with practi- 
tioners in the field. Students also meet others with 
similar interest and are eligible to participate in region- 
al and national programs and activities. 

Additional information may be obtained by con- 
tacting the faculty adviser for the chapter. Dr. James 
Adcock, in the Department of Criminal Justice. 

Alpha Phi Sigma-Alpha Tau Chapter 

Alpha Tau is the local chapter of Alpha Phi Sigma, 
the National Criminal Justice Honor Society. Alpha 
Tau's purpose is to recognize and promote academic 
excellence among undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents. The local chapter was formed in 1998 and 
embraces the full spectrum of criminal justice students 
from criminal justice and forensic science to pre-law 
and the related social sciences. 

Undergraduate students who have completed 60 
credit hours and at least four criminal justice 
courses, and who have at least a 3.4 cumulative 
QPR are eligible for membership. Graduate students 
who have a 3.4 cumulative QPR and who have com- 
pleted at least 12 credit hours of graduate work, or 
9 credit hours of graduate work and at least 3 addi- 
tional undergraduate credit hours, are eligible 
for membership. 

Additional information may be obtained by con- 
tacting the Alpha Tau adviser, Dr. James Monahan, in 
the Department of Criminal Justice. 



The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine their education with practical, paid work 
experience in their career field. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in this 
catalog or contact the Co-op coordinator in the School 
of Public Safety and Professional Studies. 

B.S., Criminal Justice 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal justice are 
required to complete at least 121 credit hours, includ- 
ing the university core curriculum and the common 
courses for criminal justice majors listed below: 

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJ 102 Criminal Law 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal Investigation 

CJ 205 Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 217 Criminal Procedure I 

CJ 250 Scientific Methods in Human Services 

CJ 251 Quantitative Applications in Human Services 

CJ 3 1 1 Criminology 

CJ 400 Criminal Justice Problems Seminar 

CJ 500A Criminal Justice Pre-Internship 

CJ 500B Criminal Justice Internship 

Concentration in Corrections 

This concentration is designed to prepare students 
for careers with federal, state, local and private correc- 
tional agencies and institutions. It is concerned with 
the treatment of offenders, administration, planning 
and research. The curriculum emphasizes law, social 
and behavioral sciences, and research methodology. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal justice with a 
concentration in corrections must complete the uni- 
versity core curriculum, the common courses for crim- 
inal justice majors listed above, and the following: 

CJ 209 Correctional Treatment Programs 

CJ 220 Legal Issues in Corrections 

CJ 408 Child and Family Intervention Strategies 

CJ 409 Adult Intervention Strategies 

CJ 4 1 2 Substance Abuse and Addictive Behavior 



141 



Plus one restricted elective 
Plus twelve electives 



Plus four restricted elective 
Plus nine electives 



Concentration in Investigative Services 

This concentration is designed to provide an interdis- 
ciplinary educational program for those people entering 
law enforcement science fields, especially investigative 
work. In addition, it is geared toward enhancing the sci- 
entific knowledge of those people now holding inves- 
tigative positions in various enforcement agencies. The 
curriculum emphasizes law enforcement, evidence, 
forensic science, and natural and physical sciences. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal justice with a 
concentration in investigative services must complete the 
university core curriculum, the common courses for 
criminal justice majors listed above, and the following: 

CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic Science 
CJ 218 Criminal Procedure II and Evidence 
CJ 303 Forensic Science Laboratory I 
CJ 415 Crime Scene Investigation and 

Pattern Evidence 
CJ 420 Advanced Investigative Techniques 

Plus one restricted elective 
Plus twelve electives 

Concentration in Juvenile 
and Family Justice 

This concentration is designed to prepare students 
for careers with federal, state, local and private correc- 
tional agencies, and with service agencies whose mission 
brings them into regular contact with the justice system. 
The curriculum is geared to preparing service providers 
with knowledge of law, social and behavioral sciences as 
well as communication skills with children, adolescents 
and people of diverse cultural backgrounds. 

Students earning a B.S. in criminal justice with a con- 
centration in juvenile and family justice must complete 
the university core curriculum, the common courses for 
criminal justice majors listed above, and the following: 

CJ 209 Correctional Treatment Programs 

CJ 221 Juvenile Justice System 

CJ 408 Child and Family Intervention Strategies 

CJ 409 Adult Intervention Strategies 

CJ 411 Victimology 



Concentration in Law 
Enforcement Administration 

This concentration prepares students for careers 
in federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, 
public and private security forces, planning agencies 
and other related settings. The curriculum focuses on 
the roles, activities and behaviors of people with 
regard to maintaining law and order, providing need- 
ed services, protecting life and property, and plan- 
ning and research. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal justice with a 
concentration in law enforcement administration 
must complete the university core curriculum, the 
common courses for criminal justice majors listed 
above, and the following: 

CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic Science 

CJ 218 Criminal Procedure II and Evidence 

CJ 221 Juvenile Justice System 

CJ 333 Police Civil Liability 

CJ 402 Police in Society 

Plus two restricted elective 
Plus eleven electives 

Concentration in Private Security 

The concentration in private security' is designed to 
provide those entering or now holding administrative 
or managerial positions in private security with the nec- 
essary skills and know-how to perform effectively and 
professionally. The program is interdisciplinary in 
nature and draws from the fields of criminal justice, 
forensic science, business administration, industrial 
engineering and the behavioral sciences. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal justice with a 
concentration in private security must complete the 
university core curriculum, the common courses for 
criminal justice majors listed above, and the following: 

CJ 105 Introduction to Security 

CJ 203 Security Administration 

CJ 226 Industrial Security 

CJ 306 Security Problems Seminar 

CJ 4 1 Legal Issues in Private Security 



Public Safety & Professional Studies 142 



Plus two restricted elective 
Plus eleven electives 

Concentration in Research and 
Program Evaluation 

This concentration focuses on the application of 
research methodology and computer technology to 
research efforts in the fields of criminal justice and 
human services. Advanced research design and experi- 
ence using computer-assisted statistical packs enable 
students to develop and apply research principles to 
real agency problems. Students who pursue this con- 
centration are most likely to have a strong interest in 
legislative, policy or human service careers as well as an 
interest in graduate programs in criminology, social 
sciences, law or human services. 

Students earning the B.S. degree in criminal justice 
with a concentration in research and program evalua- 
tion must complete the university core curriculum, the 
common courses for criminal justice majors listed 
above, and the following: 

CJ 350 Leadership and Management 

in Human Services 
CJ 498 Research Project 
CJ 540 Computer Applications in Research 

and Program Evaluation 
CJ 54 1 Problem Solving: Planning, Analysis 

and Evaluation 
CJ 557 Crime Mapping and Analysis 

Plus MG 115 Fundamentals of Management, 
E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation, 
E 230 Public Speaking, and one additional 
restricted elective 

Plus nine electives 

Concentration in Victim 
Services Administration 

This concentration provides students with an 
interdisciplinary, practice-oriented educational pro- 
gram. It is designed to prepare graduates for entry 
into a wide variety of positions in law enforcement, 
criminal justice, the courts, corrections, victim servic- 
es programs as well as professional settings involving 
work with victims of crime, their families and the 



community-at-large. The curriculum encourages a 
broad-based training experience focusing on the 
enhancement of the appropriate involvement of vic- 
tims in the justice system and the provision of servic- 
es to victims and survivors. 

Students earning the B.S. in criminal justice with a 
concentration in victim services administration must 
complete the university core curriculum, the common 
courses for criminal justice majors listed above, and 
the following: 

CJ 2 1 Ethnic and Gender Issues in Criminal Justice 

CJ 221 Juvenile Justice System 

CJ 315 Domestic Violence 

CJ 4 1 1 Victimology 

CJ 413 Victim Law and Service Administration 

Plus two restricted electives 
Plus eleven electives 

A.S., Criminal Justice 

Students completing the first two years of the bach- 
elor of science degree program in criminal justice with 
the law enforcement administration concentration or 
the corrections concentration (61 credit hours) are eligi- 
ble to receive the associate in science degree. Interested 
students should contact their adviser. 

Minor in Criminal Justice 

To minor in criminal justice, students must com- 
plete 18 credit hours of criminal justice courses, 
including CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice. 

Forensic Science 

Director: Howard A. Harris, Ph.D., J.D. 
Coordinator: Marilyn T Miller, M.S. 

B.S., Forensic Science 

Forensic science is a broad, interdisciplinary field in 
which biological and physical science methods are used 
to analyze and evaluate physical evidence related to mat- 
ters of criminal and civil law. The objective of the pro- 
gram is to provide an appropriate education and scien- 
tific background to men and women planning careers as 



143 



physical evidence examiners in crime laboratories. The 
curriculum is also appropriate for individuals currently 
working in forensic science laboratories and would be 
valuable for those interested in related areas whose pro- 
fessional work requires in-depth knowledge of science 
and scientific investigation methods. The curriculum 
provides sufficient flexibility to allow students to focus 
their studies in chemistry or in biology. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in forensic science must 
complete 131 credit hours, including the university 
core curriculum and the following courses: 

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJ 102 Criminal Law 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal Investigation 

CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic Science 

CJ 403-404 Advanced Forensic Science 

Laboratory I and II 
CJ 415 Crime Scene Investigation 

and Pattern Evidence 
CJ 416 Seminar in Forensic Science 

CJ 502 Forensic Science Internship, or 

CJ 498 Research Project 
BI 253-254 General Biology for Science Majors 

with Laboratory I and II 
BI 304 Immunology with Laboratory, or 

M 203 Calculus III 
BI 311 Molecular Biology with Laboratory, or 

CH 331/333 Physical Chemistry I 

with Laboratory 
BI 461 Biochemistry with Laboratory, or 

CH 332/334 Physical Chemistry II 

with Laboratory 
CH 115-116 General Chemistry I and II 
CH 117-118 General Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
CH 201-202 Organic Chemistry I and II 
CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
CH 211 Quantitative Analysis with Laboratory 

CH 221 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

with Laboratory 
CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

M 117-118 Calculus I and II 
PH 150 Mechanics, Heat and Waves 

with Laboratory 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 

with Laboratory 



Plus five electives chosen through discussion 
with adviser. 



Criminal Justice Certificates 

Adviser: Lynn Monahan, Ph.D. 

The department offers certificates in law enforcement 
science and private security. Students must complete 1 8 
credit hours of required courses to earn a certificate. 
Credits earned for a certificate may be applied toward the 
requirements for a degree program at a later date. 

Law Enforcement Science Certificate 

This certificate is designed to provide the funda- 
mentals of criminal investigation techniques and pro- 
cedures, particularly for those involved in or planning 
to enter investigative positions in law enforcement 
agencies in both the private and public sectors. All stu- 
dents are required to take 18 credit hours, including 
the courses listed below: 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal Investigation 
CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic Science 
CJ 227 Fingerprints with Laboratory 
CJ 303 Forensic Science Laboratory I and II 
CJ 415 Crime Scene Investigation and 
Pattern Evidence 

Plus one CJ elective 

Private Security Certificate 

This certificate is a concentrated program of study 
in management security systems for private business 
and industry. All students are required to take 1 8 cred- 
it hours, including the courses listed below: 

CJ 105 Introduction to Security 

CJ 203 Security Administration 

CJ 226 Industrial Security 

CJ 410 Legal Issues in Private Security 

FS 204 Fire Investigation I 

SH 1 00 Safety Organization and Management 

Victim Services Certificate 

Students matriculated in other concentration areas, as 
well as non-matriculated students, may elect to take 



Public Safety & Professional Studies 144 



the five courses listed below to earn a certificate in vic- 
tim services administration. Although internships are 
not required of certificate students, an internship 
experience is strongly encouraged and will be facilitat- 
ed at the student's request. 

CJ 2 1 Ethnic and Gender Issues in 
Criminal Justice 

CJ 22 1 Juvenile Justice System 

CJ315 Domestic Violence 

CJ 411 Victimology 

CJ 413 Victim Law and Service Administration 

Forensic Science Certificates 

Forensic Computer 
Investigation Certificate 

Adviser: Thomas A. Johnson, D. Crim. 

This certificate is designed for those professionals 
who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills in 
forensic computer investigation. Students interested in 
enrolling in the courses in this certificate must obtain 
permission of the instructor and/or the certificate 
adviser prior to registration. Alternate course selections 
may be permitted with the permission of the certifi- 
cate adviser. Four courses (12 credits) are required for 
completion of the certificate. 

CJ 520 Computer Crime: Legal Issues and 

Investigative Procedures 
CJ 524 Network Security, Data Protection 

and Telecommunications 

of the following, with approval of adviser: 

Principles of Criminal Investigation 

Criminal Procedure I 

Criminal Procedure II and Evidence 

Crime Scene Investigation and 

Pattern Evidence 

Advanced Investigative Techniques 

Special Topics 

Research Project 

Computers, Technology and Criminal 

Justice Information Management Systems 

Internet Vulnerabilities and 

Criminal Activity 



rius two 


CJ 201 


CJ 217 


CJ 218 


CJ415 


CJ 420 


CJ 450 


CJ 498 


CJ 522 



Information Protection and 
Security Certificate 

Adviser: Thomas A. Johnson, D.Crim. 

This certificate is designed to prepare individuals 
for assuming the responsibilities of protecting their 
agency or corporate information systems. The basics of 
information systems security as well as legal issues and 
cyber response strategies will be reviewed. Computer 
gaming simulations as well as on-line attack and 
defense techniques will be presented for student assign- 
ments. Five courses (15 credits) are required for com- 
pletion of the certificate. 

CJ 525 Information Systems Threats, Attacks and 

Defenses 
CJ 526 Firewall and Secure Enterprise Computing 
CJ 527 Internet Investigations and Audit-Based 

Computer Forensics 
CJ 528 Computer Viruses and Malicious Code 
CJ 529 Practical Issues in Cryptography 



Legal Studies 



CJ 523 



Coordinator: Donna Decker Morris, J.D., 
Yale University 

From the principles in our U.S. Constitution to reg- 
ulation of the food we eat, law permeates our society. 
With the globalization of the world's economy, law and 
regulation have become increasingly important 
to business. At the same time, new forms of dispute res- 
olution are being developed in government, business 
and industry as alternatives to the courtroom. Legal pol- 
icy increasingly will shape our future. Legal Studies is a 
unique and exciting undergraduate degree program to 
prepare graduates to be part of that fiiture-and to help 
shape it. 

B.S., Legal Studies 

The legal studies major provides students with an 
understanding of fundamental principles of law and 
analyzes the role and function of the American legal 
system within a societal and political context. The 
interdisciplinary course of study develops critical 
thinking and writing skills and prepares students for 



145 



law-related careers or for graduate or professional 
school. Concentrations allow students to focus on 
particular career aspirations and interests. 

A two-semester internship in the final year of study 
combines classroom learning with on-the-job experi- 
ence, enhancing employment opportunities after grad- 
uation. Placements will be geared to the student's area 
of concentration. 

Students earning a B.S. in legal studies must com- 
plete a minimum of 123 credit hours, including the 
common courses for legal studies majors and designat- 
ed courses for a legal studies concentration. 

Required common courses for major: 

LS 100 Introduction to Legal Concepts 

PS 122 State and Local Government 

LS 240 Legal Research and Writing I 

LS 241 Legal Research and Writing II 

LS 201 Legal Ethics and Professional 

Responsibilities 

LS 238 Civil Procedure I 

LS 330 Legal Investigation 

PS 332 Constitutional Law 

LS 301 Administrative Law and Regulation 

LS 501-502 Legal Studies Internship I and II 

Restricted Eiectives: 

Legal Studies majors are also required to take the 
following courses as restricted eiectives, some of which 
may be used to satisfy university core curriculum 
requirements: 

CJ 205 Interpersonal Relations, or CO 100 

Human Communication 
E 220 Writing for Business and Industry, or 

E 225 Technical Writing and Presentation, 

or E 230 Public Speaking and Group 

Discussion 
P 111 Introduction to Psychology 
PL 222 Ethics 
PS 1 2 1 American Government and Politics 

Plus one of the following sequences: 

P 301 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences and 
P 305 Experimental Methods in Psychology; 

or 
CJ 250 Scientific Methods in Criminal Justice and 
CJ 251 Quantitative Applications in Criminal Justice 



Concentrations 

Students select an area of concentration for the elective 
portion of the program. The concentrations consist of 
five courses that focus on a specific approach to the 
field of legal studies. Course selection is made with the 
assistance of the program adviser. 

Concentration in Legal Assistance 

This concentration is designed to prepare stu- 
dents for careers as paralegals/legal assistants in pri- 
vate law firms; government agencies or corporations, 
or for careers in law related areas in the insurance 
industry; the banking and securities industries; busi- 
nesses or nonprofit agencies; and in federal, state or 
local governments. Concentration eiectives allow 
students to focus on such areas as investigations, 
criminal law, general civil law, or law and financial 
issues. As part of a quality liberal arts education, the 
concentration will also enable students to pursue 
broad career opportunities or graduate school. 
Development of critical thinking, research and writ- 
ing abilities are emphasized, along with practical 
paralegal skills. 

LS 239 Civil Procedure II 

Plus four of the following, or related courses, as 
approved by program adviser: 

A 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting 

A 112 Introductory Accounting II 

A 335 Federal Income Taxation I 

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJ 102 Criminal Law 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal Investigation 

CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic Science 

CJ 415 Crime Scene Investigation and 

Pattern Evidence 
CJ 420 Advanced Investigative Techniques 
LA 101 Business Law and the 

Regulatory Environment 
LS 226 Family Law 
LS 244 Estates and Trusts 
LS 326 Real Estate Law: Property and 
Conveyancing 

LS 430 Computers and the Law 
PS 230 Anglo-American Jurisprudence 

Plus eight eiectives 



Public Safety & Professional Studies 146 



Concentration in Public Affairs 

The public affairs concentration analyzes the applica- 
tion of law to public policy concerns, while providing 
legal research and writing skills. Government regula- 
tion, multicultural issues, vulnerable populations and 
emerging issues are emphasized. This concentration is 
designed to prepare students for careers in law-related 
fields and regulatory affairs in federal, state or local 
governments, business, industry, and non-profit 
organizations and for further education in graduate or 
professional schools. 

PA 404 Public Policy Analysis 

Plus four of the following, or related courses, as 
approved by program adviser: 

AE 440 Aviation Law 

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJ 102 Criminal Law 

CJ 413 Victims' Law and Service Administration 

CJ 209 Correctional Treatment Programs 

CJ 210 Ethnic and Gender Issues in 

Criminal Justice 

CJ 221 Juvenile Justice System 

CJ 400 Criminal Justice Problems Seminar 

CO 420 Communication and the Law 

EC 3 1 1 Government Regulation of Business 

LS 239 Civil Procedure II 

LS 430 Computers and the Law 

MR 330 Coastal Resources Management 

PS 216 Urban Government and Politics 

PS 224 Public Attitudes and Public Policy 

PS 228 Public Interest Groups 

PS 230 Anglo-American Jurisprudence 

PS 231 Judicial Behavior 

PS 232 The Politics of the First Amendment 

SH 400 Occupational Safety and Health 

Legal Standards 

Plus eight electives 

Concentration in Dispute Resolution 

Students in the dispute resolution concentration 
will explore alternative methods for resolving disputes 
traditionally resolved through the civil or criminal 
legal systems. This concentration is designed to pro- 
vide students with an understanding of the theories 



and practices of alternative dispute resolution and an 
introduction to practical skills in negotiation, media- 
tion and facilitation in preparation for law-related, 
alternative dispute resolution careers in the judicial 
system, government agencies and the private sector, or 
for graduate education. 

LS 401 7\Jternative Dispute Resolution: Models 
and Practice 

Plus four of the following, or related courses, as 
approved by program adviser: 

CJ 205 Interpersonal Relations* 

CO 100 Human Communication* 

CO 410 Management Communication Seminar 

CO 205 Intercultural Communication 

P 321 Social Psychology 

SW 340 Group Dynamics 

*Must be in addition to course selected to fulfill 
common course requirement for the major. 

Plus eight electives 

A.S., Legal Studies 

The associate degree program in legal studies pre- 
pares students to work as paralegals in law firms and in 
legal departments or law-related positions in corpora- 
tions, banks, and local, state and federal governments 
or to provide the basis for continuation of studies 
toward a bachelor's degree. 

Students are required to complete 60 credit 
hours, including the university core requirements for 
the associate's degree and the first two years of the 
legal studies major, with either CJ 205 Interpersonal 
Relations or CO 100 Human Communication in 
place of a lab science course, and with two semesters 
of Civil Procedure I and II in place of two govern- 
ment courses.* 

Successful completion of the requirements for an 
associate's degree in legal studies includes the courses 
required for the Paralegal Studies Certificate described 
in the next section. This certificate is awarded via the 
Institute of Law and Public Affairs. 

* Students continuing on to complete a bachelor's 
degree will be required to take the lab science course 



147 



and rwo government courses in order to meet univer- 
sity core curriculum requirements for the legal studies 
major at the baccalaureate level. 

Minor in Legal Studies 

Students may minor in legal studies by successfully 
completing LS 100 Introduction to Legal Concepts 
plus five additional legal studies courses. 

The Institute of Law 
and Public Afifairs 

Director: William M. Norton, J.D., Ph.D. 

The Institute of Law and Public Affairs has been 
established to provide undergraduates with specific 
training in the areas of the paralegal profession, pub- 
lic policy and public affairs. Students with an under- 
graduate major in any of the schools of the universi- 
ty may attain paraprofessional status in legal affairs 
or public affairs by completing a minor in the 
Institute. The term paraprofessional applies to those 
with special training in a professional field but who 
do not yet possess the terminal degree normally 
required in the profession. In many instances, para- 
professional status is a step toward the accomplish- 
ment of the final degree. 



Paralegal Studies Certificate 

Adviser: Donna Decker Morris, J.D. 

A certificate in paralegal studies is issued to students 
who complete 1 8 credit hours of paralegal courses. The 
University of New Haven has conducted this certificate 
program since 1971, providing paralegal education to 
both traditional and part-time evening students. The 
following courses are required for the certificate. 

LS 100 Introduction to Legal Concepts 

LS 238 Civil Procedure I 

LS 240 Legal Research & Writing I 

LS 241 Legal Research & Writing II 

Plus two of the following, or related courses, as 
approved by the program adviser: 

LA 20 1 Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibilities 

LS 226 Family Law 

LS 239 Civil Procedure II 

LS 244 Estates and Trusts 

LS 301 Administrative Law and Regulation 

LS 326 Real Estate Law: Property & Conveyancing 

LS 328 Legal Management and Administrative Skills 

LS 330 Legal Investigation 

LS 430 Computers and the Law 

Department of 
Professional Studies 



Minor in Public Affairs 

The public affairs minor in the Institute of Law 
and Public Affairs is directed towards providing 
training for civil service positions at all levels of gov- 
ernment. The goal of such training is to provide 
more effective public administrators and to intro- 
duce creativity into the profession of public service. 
The public affairs minor will take a problem-solving 
approach to the discipline as students will be con- 
ducting basic, in-depth research on problems of gov- 
ernmental agencies. Students in this minor will be 
able to develop valuable insights into the nature of 
the public policy process from the vantage point of 
the bureaucracy. Courses are selected in consultation 
with a faculty adviser. 



Chair: Brad T Garber, Ph.D. 

Professor: Brad T Garber, Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

Associate Professors: Howard J. Cohen, Ph.D., 
University of Michigan; David P. Hunter, M.P.A., 
University of New Haven; Martin J. O'Connor, 
J.D., University of Connecticut 

Assistant Professors: Sorin Iliescu, M.S., University 
of New Haven; Robert E. Massicotte, Jr., M.S., 
University of New Haven 

Practitioners-in-Residence: Hamdy M. Balba, 

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Mark B. 
Haskins, M.S., University of New Haven; Robert 
G. Sawyer, III, M.S., University of New Haven 



Public Safety & Professional Studies 148 



The department of professional studies offers sever- 
al degree programs for students interested in specific 
employment-related areas: aviation science, air trans- 
portation management, fire science (technology, 
administration and fire/arson investigation) fire pro- 
tection engineering and occupational safety and health 
(administration and technology). A number of certifi- 
cates are offered in these fields, as well as a certificate 
in paralegal studies and minors in legal/public affairs. 

Aviation 

Director: David R Hunter, M.P.A. 

The university's aviation programs prepare students 
for employment in many aspects of the aviation indus- 
try. Trained professionals with both technical and 
managerial skills are employed as commercial, private 
or general flight and service personnel as well as in the 
manufacturing sector of this dynamic field. The avia- 
tion department offers a number of choices in its cur- 
riculum for students interested in careers in aviation. 

The program leading to the associate's degree in avi- 
ation science provides students with a two-year pro- 
gram that consists of the classroom instruction in vari- 
ous aspects of aviation plus the choice of a concentra- 
tion in either business administration or arts and sci- 
ences. Each concentration consists of a group of the 
basic core courses required for fijture study in that field. 

Following completion of the associate's degree, stu- 
dents may continue study for a bachelor's degree in air 
transportation management or in some other program 
that meets individual career objectives. 

The bachelor of science degree in air transportation 
management provides students with the knowledge 
and skills contained in a strong foundation of aviation 
management courses and related subjects that are re- 
quired of pilots and executives in the aviation industry. 

B.S., Air Transportation Management 

Students earning the B.S. in air transportation 
management must complete 122 credit hours includ- 
ing the university core curriculum, electives, the 
required courses listed below plus additional required 
courses (12 credit hours) selected in consultation with 
the faculty adviser. 



Required Courses 

AE 100 Aviation Science-Private 

AE 110 Aviation Meteorology 

AE 120 Foundations of Aviation 

AE 130 Aviation Science— Commercial 

AE 140 Concepts of Aerodynamics 

AE 200 Aviation Science-Instrument 

AE 210 Gas Turbine Powerplants 

AE 230 Flight Instructor Seminar 

AE 320 Air Traffic Control 

AE 400 Airport Management 

AE 410 Corporate Aviation Management 

AE 420 Airline Management 

AE 430 Aviation Safety Seminar 

AE 440 Aviation Law 

A 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting 

A 102 Introduction to Managerial Accounting 

CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

EC 133-134 Principles of Economics I and II 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra 

M 115 Pre-Calculus 

A.S., Aviation Science 

A total of 64 credit hours, including the university 
core curriculum for the associate's degree program, is 
required for the associate in science degree in aviation 
science. The program is designed to be completed in 
two years. 

Required Courses 

In addition to the courses listed below, students will 
select an area of concentration in consultation with the 
director of aviation programs in either business admin- 
istration or arts and sciences. This concentration will 
prepare students for the continuation of their educa- 
tion toward a bachelor's degree to meet their individ- 
ual needs and career objectives. 

AE 100 Aviation Science-Private 

AE 110 Aviation Meteorology 

AE 130 Aviation Science-Commercial 

AE 140 Concepts of Aerodynamics 

AE 200 Aviation Science-Instrument 

AE 210 Gas Turbine Powerplants 

AE 230 Flight Instructor Seminar 

EC 133-134 Principles of Economics I and II 



149 



Plus the university associate's degree program 
core courses. 



Fire Science 

Director: Robert E. Massicotte, Jr., M.S. 

The United States continues to be among those 
countries worldwide which suffer the highest degree of 
destruction to Mfe and property from fire. The 
arson/fraud fire problem continues to contribute to 
these statistics at an alarming rate. 

Concern over this unnecessary loss of life and 
property has triggered a rapidly growing need for 
professionals in fire science. The municipal fire serv- 
ice is only one part of this demand for individuals 
with specialized education in this multidisciplined 
field. Career opportunities in the public sector 
include municipal firefighters, fire inspectors, fire 
investigators, fire technicians and fire protection 
engineers. Private sector careers include industrial 
firefighters, fire protection specialists, fire protection 
engineers, fire investigators and loss control consult- 
ants. Government, industry, fire equipment manu- 
facturers and vendors, and the insurance industry are 
all potential employers. 

The University of New Haven offers three under- 
graduate degrees and four certificate programs 
designed for those individuals entering the exciting 
field of fire science. A combination of classroom lec- 
tures, laboratory sessions, case studies and field trips 
are utilized to give the student the broadest possible 
exposure in this area of study. Internships are used to 
allow the student to obtain real-life work experience in 
this specialized field. 

The university also offers graduate certificate pro- 
grams and a master's degree in fire science for those 
completing their bachelor's degrees. 

Fire Science Club 

The Fire Science Club is the campus student activ- 
ities organization for those students with interests in 
fire science and related fields. This very active organi- 
zation organizes field trips, fire safety and substance 
abuse programs along with other activities, both on 
and off campus, throughout the school year. 



Student Branch of the Connecticut Valley 
Chapter of SFPE 

The Student Branch of the Connecticut Valley 
Chapter of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers is 
the professional society on campus for fire science stu- 
dents. The Student Branch works closely with the Fire 
Science Club to provide programs and field trips with 
a strong technical basis. 

B.S., Fire Science 

The bachelor of science in fire science is offered with 
a choice of three concentrations to allow the student to 
major in fire science and specialize in an area of interest. 
The concentration areas are Fire/ Arson Investigation, 
Fire Administration and Fire Science Technology. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in fire science are 
required to complete at least 128 credit hours includ- 
ing the university core curriculum and the common 
courses for fire science listed below, some of which ful- 
fill requirements of the university core curriculum. 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

FS 201 Essentials of Fire Chemistry with Laboratory 

FS 203 Fire and Casualty Insurance 

FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 

FS 301 Building Construction Codes and Standards 

FS 302 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 

FS 303 Process and Transportation Hazards 

FS 304 Fire Detection and Control 

FS 305 Fire Detection and Control Laboratory 

FS 311 Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 

FS 312 Fire Protection Fluids and Systems Laboratory 

FS 325 Fire/Life Safety Codes 

FS 404 Special Hazards Control 

FS 497 Research Project 

FS 501 Internship 

CH 115 General Chemistry I 

CH 117 General Chemistry I Laboratory 

CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

Plus electives chosen with the adviser. 

Concentration in Fire/Arson Investigation 

This concentration is designed to prepare students 



Public Safety & Professional Studies 1 50 



for careers in fire investigation, arson/fraud detection 
and code enforcement in both the public and private 
sectors. The curriculum provides the educational back- 
ground required to determine the cause and origin of 
fires as well as an in-depth study of the laws regarding 
fire investigations and evidence collection. Students 
choosing this concentration will complete the require- 
ments for a minor in criminal justice. Students earning 
the B.S. in fire science with a concentration in 
fire/arson investigation must complete 128 credit 
hours including the university core curriculum, the 
common courses for fire science majors listed above 
and the courses listed below, some of which fulfill 
requirements of the university core curriculum. 

FS 106 Emergency Scene Operations 

FS 204 Fire Investigation I 

FS 313 Fire Investigation II 

FS 314 Fire Investigation II Laboratory 

FS 408 Fire Protection Law 

FS 409 Arson for Profit 

CJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJ 102 Criminal Law 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal Investigation 

CJ 215 Introduction to Forensic Science 

CJ 217 Criminal Procedure I 

CJ 218 Criminal Procedure II and Evidence 

CJ 221 Juvenile Justice System, or 

CJ 415 Crime Scene Investigation 

and Pattern Evidence 
M 109 Intermediate Algebra, cr 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 
P 111 Introduction to Psychology 
P 336 Abnormal Psychology 

Concentration in Fire Administration 

This concentration is designed to prepare students 
for careers in municipal, private or industrial fire 
departments. The curriculum provides the education- 
al background to advance through the ranks and 
become the future leaders of the fire service. 

Students earning the B.S. in fire science with a con- 
centration in fire administration must complete a min- 
imum of 128 credit hours including the university core 
curriculum, the common courses for fire science majors 
listed above and the courses listed below, some of which 



flilfill requirements of the university core curriculum. 

FS 105 Municipal Fire Administration 

FS 106 Emergency Scene Operations 

FS 204 Fire Investigation I 

FS 313 Fire Investigation II 

FS 314 Fire Investigation II Laboratory 

FS 405 Emergency Incident Management 

FS 408 Fire Protection Law 

CJ 105 Introduction to Security 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra, or 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

Plus one Physics Elective 

SH 100 Safety Organization and Management 
SH 110 Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

Concentration in Fire Science Technology 

This concentration focuses on the technological as- 
pects of fire science. Fire control by design, construction 
and fuced fire suppression systems is stressed. A combi- 
nation of fire science and engineering courses is used to 
prepare the student to apply basic engineering principles 
to the fire problem. Fire prevention and code compli- 
ance are stressed in this program. Careers in this field are 
mainly in the private sector; however, these skills are 
becoming more important in all areas, as the fire service 
prepares to meet the technical challenges of the fiiture. 

Students earning the B.S. in fire science with a con- 
centration in fire science technology must complete 
129 credit hours including the university core curricu- 
lum, the common courses for fire science majors listed 
above and the courses listed below, some of which fiil- 
fill requirements of the university core curriculum. 

FS 308 Industrial Fire Protection I 

FS 309 Industrial Fire Protection II 

FS 425 Fire Protection Plan Review 

FS 460 Fire Hazards Analysis 

CE205 Statics and Strength of Materials 

CE 306 Hydraulics 

M 117 Calculus I 

M 118 Calculus II 

ME 204 Dynamics 

ME 301 Thermodynamics I 

MG 115 Fundamentals of Management 



151 



PH 1 50 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with Laboratory 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 

with Laboratory 
SH 100 Safety Organization and Management 
SH 1 10 Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

B.S., Fire Protection Engineering 

Coordinator: Nelson Dunston, M.S. 

The role of a fire protection engineer is to safeguard 
life and property from the devastating effects of fire and 
explosions by applying sound, multidisciplined engi- 
neering principles to the fire protection problem. 
Through a combination of engineering and fire science 
courses, students learn how to design, construct and 
install fire protection systems which prevent or minimize 
potential losses from fire, water, smoke or explosions. 

Graduates of the fire protection engineering pro- 
gram will be qualified to design, evaluate or test sys- 
tems responsible for the reduction of fire losses. They 
will also be prepared to anal}^e the fire protection 
defenses of various structures and operations, and rec- 
ommend cost effective methods of improving the level 
of protection that is provided. 

Careers in this field may be in the private or public 
sector. Government, insurance, industry, manufactur- 
ers and consultants are prospective employers of fire 
protection engineers. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the B.S. in fire protection engi- 
neering must complete 131 credit hours including the 
university core curriculum and the courses listed 
below, some of which fiilfill requirements of the uni- 
versity core curriculum. 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 
FS 20 1 Essentials of Fire Chemistry 

with Laboratory 
FS 203 Fire and Casualty Insurance 
FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 
FS 301 Building Construction Codes 

and Standards 
FS 303 Process and Transportation Hazards 
FS 304 Fire Detection and Control 
FS 305 Fire Detection and Control Laboratory 



FS 308 Industrial Fire Protection I 

FS 309 Industrial Fire Protection II 

FS 311 Fire Protection Fluids and Systems 

FS 312 Fire Protection Fluids and 

Systems Laboratory 
FS 325 Fire/Life Safety Codes 
FS 404 Special Hazards Control 
FS 425 Fire Protection Plan Review 
FS 450 Fire Protection Heat Transfer 
FS 460 Fire Hazards Analysis 
CE 205 Statics and Strength of Materials 
CE 306 Hydraulics 
CH 115 General Chemistry I 
CH 117 General Chemistry I Laboratory 
CH 1 16 General Chemistry II 
CH 118 General Chemistry II Laboratory 
CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 
ES 107 Introduction to Engineering 
IE 204 Engineering Economics 
M 117 Calculus I 
M 118 Calculus II 
M 203 Calculus III 
M 204 Differential Equations 
ME 200 Engineering Materials 
ME 204 Dynamics 
ME 301 Thermodynamics I 

PH 150 Mechanics, Heat and Waves with Laboratory 
PH 205 Electromagnetism and Optics 

with Laboratory 

Plus electives chosen with the adviser. 

A.S., Fire and Occupational Safety 

This two-year associate in science degree off^ers stu- 
dents a well-rounded, basic program in the fields of 
occupational safety and fire science. 

Many students continue on to earn their bachelor's 
degrees in occupational safety or fire science. The pro- 
gram is specifically designed for the individual who 
wishes to enter the private sector in the fields of occu- 
pational safety and fire protection. 

Career options in this field include industry and 
insurance. 

Required Courses 

Students earning the A.S. in fire and occupation- 



Public Safety & Professional Studies 1 52 



al safety must complete 62 credit hours including 
the university core curriculum for associate's degree 
programs and the courses listed below, some of 
which fulfill requirements of the university core 
curriculum: 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

FS 201 Essentials of Fire Chemistry with Laboratory 

FS 203 Fire and Casualty Insurance 

FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 

FS 303 Process and Transportation Hazards 

FS 308 Industrial Fire Protection I 

FS 309 Industrial Fire Protection II 

CH. 115 General Chemistry I 

CH 1 17 General Chemistry I Laboratory 

CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra, or 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

SH 100 Safety Organization and Management 

SH 110 Accident Conditions and Controls 

SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

Plus electives chosen with the adviser 

Minor in Fire Science 

Students wishing to minor in fire science should 
contact the director of the program. A minimum of 19 
credit hours is required. The courses listed below are 
required unless a substitution is approved by the direc- 
tor of fire science. 

Required Courses 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

FS 201 Essentials of Fire Chemistry with Laboratory 

FS 204 Fire Investigation I 

FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 

FS 301 Building Construction Codes and Standards 

FS 303 Process and Transportation Hazards 

Fire Science Certificates 

The fire science department offers certificates in 
fire/arson investigation, fire prevention, industrial 
fire protection and hazardous materials. To earn a 
certificate, students must complete between 18 and 
19 credit hours. Credits earned for a certificate may 
be applied to an associate's or bachelor's degree in fire 
science. 



Fire/Arson Investigation Certificate 

The fire/arson investigation certificate is designed 
to provide individuals in either the public or private 
sector with the fundamentals required to determine 
the cause and origin of fires. Investigative techniques 
and arson determination are included in this certificate 
program. Students are required to complete 19 credit 
hours, including the courses listed below. 

Required Courses 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

FS 203 Fire and Casualty Insurance 

FS 204 Fire Investigation I 

FS 313 Fire Investigation II 

FS 314 Fire Investigation II Laboratory 

FS 408 Fire Protection Law 

FS 409 Arson for Profit 

Fire Prevention Certificate 

The Fire Prevention certificate is designed to provide 
the fundamentals of fire protection and prevention to 
the individual interested in fire inspection and/or code 
compliance. The certificate is applicable to both the 
public and private sectors with an emphasis on proper- 
ty loss control. Students are required to complete 19 
credit hours, including the courses listed below. 

Required Courses 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

FS 201 Essentials of Fire Chemistry with Laboratory 

FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 

FS 303 Process and Transportation Hazards 

FS 325 Fire/Life Safety Codes 

FS 404 Special Hazards Control 

Industrial Fire Protection Certificate 

The industrial fire protection certificate is designed 
to provide the individual interested in industrial prop- 
erty loss control with the fundamentals related to this 
field. While focusing on the private sector, these prin- 
ciples are equally important to those in the public sec- 
tor who interact with those responsible for the protec- 
tion of commercial and industrial properties. Students 
are required to complete 18 credit hours, including the 
courses listed below. 



153 



Required Courses 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

FS 203 Fire and Casualty Insurance 

FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 

FS 308 Industrial Fire Protection 1 

FS 309 Industrial Fire Protection II 

FS 404 Special Hazards Control 

Hazardous Materials Certificate 

The hazardous materials certificate is designed to 
provide the fundamentals required for dealing with the 
manufacture, storage, handling and shipping of haz- 
ardous materials. The principles covered by this certifi- 
cate are equally appropriate to the public and private 
sectors. Students must complete 19 credit hours for 
this certificate. 

Required Courses 

FS 102 Principles of Fire Science Technology 

FS 20 1 Essentials of Fire Chemistry with Laboratory 

FS 302 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 

FS 303 Process and Transportation Hazards 

PH 303 Radioactivity and Radiation 

SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

Occupational Safety 
and Health 

Director: Brad T Garber, Ph.D. 

Coordinator: Howard]. Cohen, Ph.D. 

In recent years, the global community has become 
painfully aware of the importance of safety procedures 
and precautions in our everyday survival: the acciden- 
tal release of lethal gases in India and the United 
States; the shuttle Challenger disaster; the cyanide 
deaths from altered Tylenol capsules, to mention only 
a few cases. Clearly, safety decision making has been 
brought to the forefront of corporation management. 
No employer today can afford to relegate safety to a 
minor role in the organizational hierarchy. 

This great interest in safety issues has generated a 
significant demand for professional practitioners in 
the field. Industry, retailing, commerce, communica- 



tions, construction and labor unions, as well as local, 
state and federal governments, need competent safety 
specialists. 

The demands placed upon the safety professional 
require a broad background in chemistry, physics, 
engineering, psychology and biology as well as spe- 
cific knowledge in the safety sciences. Our under- 
graduate programs draw upon the resources of the 
entire university to educate students in each of these 
disciplines. In addition to required courses, students 
choose from among a diversified offering of restrict- 
ed and free electives with a balance of courses 
designed to meet the needs and interests of individ- 
ual students. Upon graduation, our students have 
received the comprehensive education needed to 
become successful professionals in occupational safe- 
ty and health. 

In addition to the four-year bachelor of science 
programs in occupational safety and health adminis- 
tration and technology, the university also offers two- 
year associate's degree programs and an occupational 
safety and health certificate. At the graduate level, 
several programs are offered which include a master 
of science in occupational safety and health manage- 
ment, a master of science in industrial hygiene and 
two graduate certificates. 

The Co-op Program 

The department participates in the cooperative 
education program (Co-op) which enables students to 
combine practical, paid work experience in their career 
field with college education. For further details see 
"The Co-op Program" which appears earlier in this 
catalog or contact the co-op coordinator for the 
School of Public Safety and Professional Studies. 

B.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration 

A group of degrees is offered in the field of occupa- 
tional safety and health administration. These pro- 
grams place less emphasis on the technical areas, but 
broaden the scope of the program into the areas of 
management and decision-making required to give 
students the broad-based outlook necessary to direct 
safety functions. 



Public Safety &: Professional Studies 1 54 



In addition to the requirements for the A.S. degree 
as shown below, bachelor's candidates must complete 
the university core curriculum and the following 
courses, for a combined total of 123 credit hours: 

Required Courses 

FS 308-309 Industrial Fire Protection I and II 
SH 400 Occupational Safety and Health 

Legal Standards 
SH 401 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 

BI 121-122 General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I and II 
E 220 Writing for Business and Industry 
E 230 Public Speaking and Group Discussion 

FS 208 Instructor Methodology 

FS 304 Fire Detection and Control 

IE 204 Engineering Economics, or 

IE 414 Engineering Management 
PH 303 Radioactivity and Radiation 

Plus 12 additional credit hours of restricted electives, 
a science methodology elective, a literature/phi- 
losophy elective, an art/music/theatre elective 
and 3 credit hours of unrestricted electives. 

B.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Technology 

Both associate's and bachelor's degrees are offered 
in the field of occupational safety and health tech- 
nology. These degree programs provide strong 
technical preparation with courses in calculus, 
chemistry, physics, biology and other disciplines 
related to the evaluation and resolution of complex 
safety problems. 

In addition to the requirements for the A.S. degree 
as shown below, bachelor's candidates also must com- 
plete 132 credit hours, which includes the university 
core curriculum and the following courses: 

Required Courses 

CH 201 Organic Chemistry I 

CH 203 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 

FS 308-309 Industrial Fire Protection I and II 

SH 400 Occupational Safety and Health Legal 

Standards 
SH 401 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 



BI 121-122 General and Human Biology with 

Laboratory I and II 

FS 304 Fire Detection and Control 

IE 303 Cost Control 

IE 348 Manufacturing Processes 

M 117-118 Calculus I and II 

PH 303 Radioactivity and Radiation 

E 220 Writing for Business and Industry 

SO 113 Sociology 

Plus 9 credit hours of restricted electives, a science 
methodology elective, a literature/philosophy 
elective and an art/music/theatre elective. 

A.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration 

Students earning the A.S. in occupational safety 
and health administration must complete 64 credit 
hours including the courses listed below: 

Core Courses 

CH 105 Introduction to General and Organic 

Chemistry with Laboratory 

CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 

Pill Introduction to Psychology 

Required Courses 

SH 100 Safety Organization and Management 

SH 110 Accident Conditions and Controls 

SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

FS 106 Emergency Scene Operations 

FS 20 1 Essentials of Fire Chemistry with Laboratory 

EN 101 Introduction to Environmental Science 

EN 102 Environmental Science Laboratory 

CJ 105 Introduction to Security 

M 228 Elementary Statistics 

SO 113 Sociology 

Plus 6 credit hours of unrestricted electives and 

an arts elective. 
Plus 3 credit hours as restricted elective(s) 



155 



A.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Technology 

Students earning the A.S. degree in occupational 
safety and health technology must complete 67 credit 
hours including the courses listed below: 

Core Courses 

CH 1 1 5 General Chemistry I 

CH 117 General Chemistry I Laboratory 

CS 107 Introduction to Data Processing 

E 105 Composition 

E 110 Composition and Literature 

HS 102 The Western World in Modern Times 

M 115 Pre-Calculus 

P 111 Introduction to Psychology 

Required Courses 

SH 100 Safety Organization and Management 
SH 1 10 Accident Conditions and Controls 
SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 
FS 201 Essentials of Fire Chemistry 

with Laboratory 
CH 116 General Chemistry II 
CH 118 General Chemistry II Laboratory 
CJ 105 Introduction to Security 
IE 204 Engineering Economics, (?r IE 414 

Engineering Management 
M 228 Elementary Statistics 
PH 103-104 General Physics I and II 
with Laboratory 

Plus 6 credit hours of unrestricted electives and 
an arts elective. 



Occupational Safety and 
Health Certificate 

Coordinator: Howard J. Cohen, Ph.D. 

The department offers an occupational safety and 
health certificate for which students must complete 18 
credit hours. This program of study covers the funda- 
mentals of on-the-job safety and health as well as the 
requirements of OSHA regulations. These courses 
provide an introduction to dealing with problems typ- 
ically confronted by safety professionals. 

Required Courses 

FS 308 Industrial Fire Protection I 

SH 100 Safety Organization and Management 

SH 110 Accident Conditions and Controls 

SH 200 Elements of Industrial Hygiene 

SH 400 Occupational Safety and Health Legal 

Standards 

SH 401 Industrial Hygiene Measurements 



156 



COURSES 



Course descriptions are arranged alphabetically by the course prefix code letters as listed below. For the purpose 
of brevity, course descriptions do not follow traditional rules of grammar and may consist of sentence fragments. 



A Accounting 

AE Aviation 

AT Art/Visual Arts 

B 



FI Finance 

FR French 

FS Fire Science 



BA Business Administration 
BI Biology 



CA Culinary Arts 

CE Civil Engineering 

CEN Computer Engineering 

CH Chemistry 

CJ Criminal Justice 

CM Chemical Engineering 

CO Communication 

CS Computer Science 

D 

DH Dental Hygiene 

DI Dietetics 



E English 

EC Economics 

EE Electrical Engineering 

EN Environmental Science 

ES Engineering Science 



FE Freshman Experience 



GR German 



H 



P Psychology 

PA Public Management 

PCM Private Club Management 

PH Physics 

PL Philosophy 

PS Political Science 



HMS 


Human Services 


Q 




HR 


Hotel & Restaurant 










QA 


Quantitative Analysis 




Management 






HS 


History 


R 




HU 


Humanities 


RU 


Russian 


I 




s 




IB 


International Business 


SC 


Science 


IE 


Industrial Engineering 


SH 


Occupational Safety & 


J 




SO 


Health 






Sociology 


J 


Journalism 


SP 


Spanish 


L 




sw 


Social Welfare 


LA 


Business Law 


T 




LG 


Logistics 


T 


Theatre Arts 


M 


Mathematics 


TA 


Tourism Administration 


M 






ME 


Mechanical Engineering 






MG 


Management 






MK 


Marketing 






MM 


Multimedia 






MR 


Marine Biology 






MU 


Music 







157 



ACCOUNTING 

A 101 Introduction to 
Financial Accounting 

Deals primarily with reporting the 
financial results of operations and 
financial position to investors, 
managers and other interested par- 
ties. Emphasizes the role of 
accounnng information in decision 
making. 3 credit hours. 

A 102 Introduction to 
Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 101. The applica- 
tion of accounting in relation to 
current planning and control, eval- 
uation of performances, special 
decisions and long-range planning. 
Stress is on cost analysis. Addition- 
al topics include income tax plan- 
ning, product costing and quantita- 
tive techniques. 3 credit hours. 

A 220 Intermediate Financial 
Accounting I 

Prerequisite: A 102. A rigorous 
examination of financial accounting 
theory and practice applicable to the 
corporate form of business organiza- 
tion. With an emphasis on reporting 
corporate financial status and results 
of operations, the course will include: 
the principles governing and the 
procedures for implementing 
accounting valuations for revenue, 
expense, gain, loss, current assets 
and deferred charges. 3 credit hours. 

A 22 1 Intermediate Financial 
Accounting II 

Prerequisite: A 220. Continues the 
emphasis on corporate financial 
reporting established in A 220. The 
principles and procedures applicable 
to accounnng valuations for current 
liabilities, long-term liabilities, 
deferred credits and stock-holder's 



equity are examined. Special atten- 
tion is directed to preparing the 
cash-flow statement. 3 credit hours. 

A 222 Intermediate Financial 
Accounting III 

Prerequisite: A 22 1 . Advanced top- 
ics include income tax allocation, 
pensions and leases, accounting 
changes, price-level changes, install- 
ment sales and consignments, and 
revenue recognition. 3 credit hours. 

A 223 Cost Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 102. An in-depth 
examination of the accounting prin- 
ciples and procedures underlying the 
determination of product costs for 
manufacturing concerns. Emphasis 
on job order costing systems. Other 
topics are: budgets, standard costing 
and CVP analysis. 3 credit hours. 

A 33 1 Advanced Financial 
Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 221 and junior 
standing. Advanced topics in finan- 
cial reporting, including partnership 
accounting, consolidations, cost and 
equity methods, and purchase versus 
pooling methods. 3 credit hours. 

A 333 Auditing and Reporting 
Principles 

Prerequisite: A 222, A 350 and 
junior standing. A general exami- 
nation of the role and function of 
the independent auditor in the per- 
formance of the attest function. 
Emphasis will be placed on current 
auditing pronouncements, the 
audit report, statistical sampling, 
evaluation of internal control and 
the determination of the scope of 
an audit. Rules and standards of 
compilation and review reports are 
presented. 3 credit hours. 



A 335 Federal Income Taxation I 

Prerequisite: A 102 and junior 
standing. An introduction to the 
federal income tax law including 
objectives, history and sources of 
tax law and administration. Course 
coverage will be devoted to differ- 
ent types of tax payers including 
individuals, corporations, partner- 
ships, limited liability entities, sub- 
chapter S corporations, and trusts 
and estates. The course will explore 
income tax concepts of accounting 
methods and periods, income, 
deduction losses, property transac- 
tions, fringe benefits and retire- 
ment plans. 3 credit hours. 

A 336 Federal Income Taxation II 

Prerequisites: A 102 and A 335. 
Advanced studies in taxation 
including the tax consequences of 
the formation, operation and ter- 
mination of corporations, part- 
nerships and limited liability 
companies. Course coverage will 
also be devoted to the alternative 
minimum tax, related party trans- 
actions, estate and gift taxation, 
financial tax accounting concepts 
and ethical responsibilities in tax 
practice. 3 credit hours. 

A 350 Accounting Information 
Systems 

Prerequisite: A 221, A 223 and 
junior standing. This course pro- 
vides a thorough introduction to 
basic systems theory, a firm work- 
ing knowledge of systems analysis 
and design techniques and an 
examination of various transaction 
cycles in the accounting system. 
Emphasis is on EDP environ- 
ments. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 158 



A 450-454 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: A 102. Junior-level 
standing required unless specified 
in course schedule description. 
Selected topics in accounting or 
taxation of special or current inter- 
est. 3 credit hours. 

A 598 Internship 

Prerequisite: A 222 and junior 
standing. On-the-job experience in 
selected organizations in account- 
ing. 3 credit hours. 

A 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: A 102 and junior stand- 
ing. A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of a 
faculty member. 3 credit hours. 

AVIATION 

AE 100 Aviation Science— Private 

Basic ground instruction in aircraft 
systems and controls. FAA regula- 
tions, air traffic control, communi- 
cation, weight and balance, mete- 
orology, navigation, radio facilities 
and utilization, flight computer 
and aerodynamic theory. Successful 
completion of FAA Private Pilot 
airplane written examination is rec- 
ommended. 3 credit hours. 

AE 110 Aviation Meteorology 

Discussion and interpretation of 
atmospheric phenomena including 
an analysis of aviation forecasts and 
reports. 3 credit hours. 

AE 120 Foundations of Aviation 

A study of the development of avia- 
tion from the first efforts to fly 
through the present. The social and 
economic impact of aviation on soci- 
ety will be explored. 3 credit hours. 



AE 130 Aviation 
Science— Commercial 

Prerequisite: AE 100. Advanced 
ground instruction in navigation, 
flight computer, radio navigation, 
aircraft performance, engine opera- 
tion, aviation physiology and FAA 
regulations including FAR Parts 
121 and 135. Successftil comple- 
tion of FAA Commercial Pilot air- 
plane written examination is 
required. 3 credit hours. 

AE 140 Concepts of Aerodynamics 

The study of basic aerodynamics 
including theory of flight, analysis 
of the four forces, high lift devices, 
subsonic, transonic and supersonic 
flight. 3 credit hours. 

AE 200 Aviation Science- 
Instrument 

Prerequisite: AE 130. Ground 
instruction in preparation for the 
FAA Instrument Rating. Study 
includes a discussion of pertinent 
regulations, IFR departure, enroute, 
and arrival procedures, flight plan- 
ning, instrument approaches, air 
traffic control procedures and a 
review of meteorology. Successfiil 
completion of FAA Instrument-Air- 
plane written examination is 
required. 3 credit hours. 

AE 210 Gas Turbine Powerplants 

Prerequisite: AE 100. Discussion 
of the fundamentals of design and 
performance of aircraft jet 
engines including methods of 
construction, lubrication, engine 
operating procedures and control. 
In addition, the theory of opera- 
tion and analysis of problems 
associated with aircraft compo- 
nents and systems involving jet 
aircraft. 3 credit hours. 



AE 230 Flight Instructor Seminar 

Prerequisite: AE 200. Discussions 
of the fundamentals of instruc- 
tion with specific emphasis on 
teaching as related to the flight 
instructor. Detailed study and 
analysis of maneuvers and topics 
required of the flight instructor. 
In addition, emphasis will be 
placed on practice teaching. Suc- 
cessful completion of FAA written 
examinations (Flight Instructor 
Airplane and Fundamentals of 
Instructing) is required. 3 credit 
hours. 

AE 300 Airline Transport 
Pilot/Flight Engineer 

Prerequisites: AE 110, AE 130, 
AE 140, AE 200, AE 210. An in- 
depth knowledge of all aircraft 
systems as experienced on a large 
jet transport, advanced computer 
problems, transport-type airplane 
weight and balance computation, 
performance computations, 

meteorology with emphasis on 
upper level phenomena, regula- 
tions applicable to airline opera- 
tions. Special emphasis on crew 
concept in flight operations. 
Prepares student to take the 
FAA Airline Transport Pilot and 
Flight Engineer written exams. 
3 credit hours. 

AE 310 Air Carrier Operations 

Prerequisites: AE 110, AE 130, 
AE 200. Air carrier operations as 
related to the flight crew and dis- 
patcher. FAR 121, weight and 
balance, manifests, planning 
forms, charts and graphs, per- 
formance considerations. Success- 
ful completion of the FAA Dis- 
patcher written exam is required. 
3 credit hours. 



159 



AE 320 Introduction to Air 
Traffic Control 

Prerequisites: AE 1 10, AE 130, AE 
200. An introduction to the air 
traffic control system at the opera- 
tional level. The components of the 
national airspace system with 
emphasis on interrelationships 
between enroute, terminal, tower, 
flight service functions and the 
pilot. 3 credit hours. 

AE 400 Airport Management 

Prerequisite: junior status or 
approval of academic adviser. Dis- 
cussion and study of operational 
functions of airports, general avia- 
tion operations, terminal building 
utilization, support facilities, pub- 
lic relations and airport financing 
as related to the airport manager. 
3 credit hours. 

AE 410 Corporate Aviation 
Management 

Prerequisite: junior status or 
approval of academic adviser. Dis- 
cussion and study of the importance 
of air transportation to the corpora- 
tion, operational structure and con- 
cepts, cost analysis and budget tech- 
niques, aircraft analysis, personnel 
selection and management, aircraft 
maintenance, training and schedul- 
ing. 3 credit hours. 
AE 420 Airline Management 
Prerequisite: LA 101, FI 313 or 
approval of academic adviser. Dis- 
cussion of air commerce related to 
the transportation system. This 
course includes a study of commer- 
cial airlines and fixed-base opera- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

AE 430 Aviation Safety Seminar 
Prerequisite: senior status or 
approval of academic adviser. Crit 



ical analysis of aircraft accidents, 
accident prevention, development 
and evaluation of aviation safety 
programs. 3 credit hours. 

AE 440 Aviation Law 

Prerequisites: LA 101, A 102, AE 
400, AE 410, AE 420. The develop- 
ment of aviation law including fed- 
eral and state regulatory functions, 
rights and liabilities of aviators and 
operators. Case histories, liens and 
security interest in aircraft, torts, 
international conferences, bilateral 
and multilateral agreements, crimi- 
nal statutes. 3 credit hours. 

AE 500 Special Topics 

Selected topics of special or current 
interest in the field of aviation. 
3 credit hours. 

AE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of the pro- 
gram director. Opportunity for the 
student, under direction of a facul- 
ty member, to explore an area of 
interest. This course must be initi- 
ated by the student. 3 credit hours. 

ART/VISUAL ARTS 

AT 101-102 Introduction to 
Studio Art I and II 

Foundation study in the visual arts 
designed to heighten the student's 
aesthetic awareness and to provide 
an introduction to the study of 
drawing, painting and design using 
a variety of materials. 3 credit 
hours each. 

AT 105 Basic Drawing I 

A basic foundation course which 
includes a disciplined study in the 
fundamentals of drawing such as 
nature studies, perspective, exercis- 



es in coordination of hand and eye. 
3 credit hours. 

AT 106 Basic Drawing II 

A continuation of AT 105 with 
emphasis on perspective and depic- 
tion of three-dimensional space 
and form by two-dimensional 
means. Study of architectural 
forms, natural objects and land- 
scape. 3 credit hours. 

AT 122 Graphic Design 
Production 

Prerequisite: AT 100 level course or 
consent of the instructor. Studio 
introduction to the technical skills 
of graphic design including: copy- 
fitting, type specification, typeset- 
ting, layout and mechanical prepa- 
ration. 3 credit hours. 

AT 201 Painting I 

Problems in pictorial composition 
involving manipulation of form and 
color. Various techniques of apply- 
ing pigment will be explored as well 
as mixing pigments, stretching and 
priming canvases. 3 credit hours. 

AT 202 Painting II 

A continuation of AT 201 with 
further exploration of two-dimen- 
sional pictorial arrangements of 
form and color for greatest visual 
effectiveness. Students will be 
encouraged to develop their own 
personal idiom in the medium. 
3 credit hours. 

AT 203 Graphic Design I 

Basic theoretical design studies 
concentrate on the development of 
a design vocabulary consisting of 
an understanding of form, propor- 
tion, composition, rhythm, juxta- 
position, progression and balance. 
3 credit hours. 



Courses 160 



AT 204 Graphic Design II 

Prerequisite: AT 203. An investiga- 
tion of formal aspects of composi- 
tion, organic and geometric form, 
graphic translation, and color. 
Emphasis on concept develop- 
ment, sequencing, and visual logic. 
3 credit hours. 

AT 205 Ceramics I 

Introduction to clay as an expres- 
sive medium. Hand-built and 
wheel-thrown methods with vari- 
ous glazing and decorative tech- 
niques. Stacking and firing kilns. 
An exploration of three-dimen- 
sional form. Good for engineers. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

AT 206 Ceramics II 

Continuation of AT 205 with free 
exploration of novel and experi- 
mental approaches to the medium. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

AT 209-210 Photography I and II 

Introduction to the technical and 
aesthetic aspects of black and white 
photography. Camera controls, 
exposure, development and print- 
making will be covered along with a 
simultaneous investigation into 
photographic design, historical tra- 
dition and media use. Photography 
II gives special emphasis on each 
student creating a body of work 
which possesses a cohesiveness of 
vision. Further investigation of pho- 
tographic technique. Laboratory 
fee; 3 credit hours each. 

AT 211 Basic Design I 

A basic foundation course includes 
exploration of two-dimensional 
visual elements-line, color, light 
and dark, shape, size, placement, 
and figure-ground, and their effec- 
tive use. A basic course for those 



wishing basic art understanding. 
3 credit hours. 

AT 212 Basic Design II 

A continuation of AT 211, with 
concentration on three-dimension- 
al elements of design including 
positive and negative volumes, sur- 
faces, structural systems, and other 
elements, employing a variety of 
materials. 3 credit hours. 

AT 213 Color 

An intensive exploration of color 
perception and interaction with 
manipulation of form and color for 
greatest effectiveness in pictorial 
compositions. 3 credit hours. 

AT 216 Architectural Drawing 

Prerequisite: AT 105. Drawing as 
applied to architectural problems. 
Drafting, drawing conventions, 
presentations, graphic symbols, 
line quality and context, and free- 
hand drawing. 3 credit hours. 

AT 22 1 Typography I 

Prerequisite: AT 203, AT 211. An 
introduction to the form, language, 
terminology and use of typogra- 
phy. Letters, words and text 
arrangements form the compo- 
nents in these theoretical studies, 
which lead to simple communica- 
tion exercises. 3 credit hours. 

AT 222 Typography II 

Prerequisite: AT 221. Exploration 
of typographic structures and hier- 
archies as well as formal aspects of 
text. The typographic principles 
are applied to complex communi- 
cation problems such as publica- 
tion design and information graph- 
ics. 3 credit hours. 



AT 225 Photographic Methods 

Prerequisite: AT 209. An explo- 
ration of ideas, experiments and 
investigations in alternative photo- 
graphic processes. Includes toning, 
cyanotype printing, gum bichro- 
mate, platinum and palladium. 
Also covered will be negative 
manipulation, hand applied color 
and pinhole cameras. Laboratory 
fee; 3 credit hours. 

AT 23 1 History of Art I 

Western art from cave art through 
the Middle Ages to Gothic. This 
course seeks to understand expres- 
sive, social, cultural, political and 
economic aspects of the cultures in 
which specific art styles and visual 
developments emerged. This course 
forms the basic vocabulary for His- 
tory of Art II. Includes economic 
and technological changes in the 
societies and their reflections in art. 
Appropriate for business and engi- 
neering students. 3 credit hours. 

AT 232 History of Art II 

Western art from the Renaissance 
to the twentieth century in Europe 
and America; a continuation of AT 
231.3 credit hours. 

AT 233 History of Architecture 
and Interior Design 

A survey of developments in archi- 
tecture from antiquity to the present 
day. Special consideration of the aes- 
thetic and practical relationships of 
architectural space to interior decor. 
For the major and those interested 
in this field. 3 credit hours. 

AT 302 Figure Drawing 

Prerequisite: AT 105 or consent of 
the instructor. Study of drawing 
which concentrates on the human 
figure. 3 credit hours. 



161 



AT 304 Sculpture I 
The exploration of three-dimen- 
sional materials for maximum 
effectiveness in expressive design. 
Experimentation with clay, plas- 
ter, wood, stone, canvas, wire 
screening, metal, found objects. A 
basic understanding of major, 
fundamental methods: casting 
and carving. Laboratory fee; 
3 credit hours. 

AT 305 Sculpture II 

A continuation of AT 304 with 
further exploration of three-dimen- 
sional materials and the possibili- 
ties they present for creative visual 
statements. Laboratory fee; 3 cred- 
it hours. 

AT 309 Photographic Design 

Prerequisite: AT 209. Introduc- 
tion to basic materials and tech- 
niques of black and white photog 
raphy used in graphic design. The 
relation between image and type, as 
well as sequencing and the extend- 
ed print will be explored along 
with collage and basic bookmak- 
ing. Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

AT 310 Photographic Lighting 

Prerequisite: AT 209. Aesthetic and 
technical understanding of light. 
Use of natural and artificial lighting 
systems and methods for working 
with both color and black and white 
film. Emphasis on the portrait and 
still life image as well as creative 
problem solving. Laboratory fee; 
3 credit hours. 

AT 311 Color Photography 

Prerequisite: AT 209. Theory and 
practice of color photography 
Study of current color photograph- 
ic materials and processes. Labora- 
tory fee; 3 credit hours. 



AT 315 Printmaking 

The expressive potential of the 
graphic image through the tech- 
niques of monoprints, etching, 
silkscreening and photo/computer 
scanned printing processes. Labo- 
ratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

AT 317 Interior Design 

Prerequisites: AT 211 or AT 212; 
AT 233 or instructor's consent. A 
basic studio course with explo- 
ration of interior design problems 
and their relationship to architec- 
ture. Special emphasis on exploita- 
tion of space, form, color and tex- 
tures for greatest effectiveness. 
3 credit hours. 

AT 322 Illustration 

A solid foundation in the tech- 
niques of creative illustration. 
Various media and their expressive 
possibilities will be studied: 
charcoal, pencil, pen and ink, 
wash, colored pencils, acrylic. 
Focuses on application of these 
techniques. 3 credit hours. 

AT 33 1 Contemporary Art 

Focusing on art since 1945. The 
developments of the present stem 
from ideas emanating from the 
1 870s-especially Impressionism; 
this course seeks to understand these 
connections. Emphasis on econom- 
ic, historical and technological 
developments. Appropriate for busi- 
ness, communication, history and 
engineering students. 3 credit hours. 
AT 333 Survey of 
Afro-American Art 
Artistic creation by African-Amer- 
icans in the United States from 
the Colonial period to the present. 
Consideration of African cultural 
influences. Analysis of modern 
trends in the work of black artists. 
3 credit hours. 



AT 401 Studio Seminar I 

Prerequisites: AT 101-102, AT 
201, AT 302 or AT 209, and art 
electives. Drawing on development 
through their previous study, stu- 
dents will concentrate on major 
projects in the areas of their choice. 
1-4 credit hours. 

AT 402 Studio Seminar II 

Prerequisite: AT 401. Continua- 
tion of Studio Seminar I. 1-4 cred- 
it hours. 

AT 403-425 Selected Topics 

Selected topics of special or current 
interest in applied art or history of 
art. Variable credit hours. 
AT 599 Independent Study 
Prerequisites: consent ol the instruc- 
tor and department chair. Opportu- 
nity for the student, under the 
direction of a faculty member, to 
explore an area of interest. This 
course must be initiated by the stu- 
dent. 1-3 credit hours. 

BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

BA 100 Leadership in the 
Business Community 

Leaders and their behavior as it per- 
tains to the role of the leader within 
the organization is the focus for this 
participatory course. Theory and 
current research regarding leadership 
are discussed as well as the prerequi- 
sites, knowledge and practices 
required for successRil leadership. 
Student participation will be 
enhanced through use of videotape, 
role playing, writing activities and 
presentations. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 162 



BIOLOGY 



Biobgy courses marked with an aster- 
isk (*) are usually scheduled every 
other academic year. Courses marked 
with the symbol (f) may be offered at 
the discretion of the department. 

BI 121-122 General and Human 
Biology with Laboratory I and II 

An introduction to the study of 
biology which integrates biological 
principles and human biology. 
Major topics covered are biochem- 
istry, cell and molecular biology, 
genetics, anatomy and physiology, 
behavior, ecology and evolution. 
The laboratory involves experimen- 
tation and demonstration of princi- 
ples covered in lecture. Bl 121 is a 
prerequisite for BI 122. Laboratory 
fee; 4 credit hours each term. 

BI 215 Principles of Nutrition 

Prerequisite: Bl 121. An introduc- 
tion to nutrition science including 
nutrient interactions, digestion, 
absorption, sources of nutrients 
and importance of phytochemicals. 
Energy metabolism, weight con- 
trol, contemporary nutrition issues 
and individual nutrition analysis 
are included. 3 credit hours. 

BI 253-254 Biology for Science 
Majors with Laboratory I and II 

A discussion of the principles of bio- 
logical organization from the molec- 
ular level through the ecological. 
The basic course for biology and 
environmental studies majors. Labo- 
ratory fee; 4 credit hours each term. 

BI 261 Introduction to 
Biochemistry 

Prerequisite: CH 105 or equivalent. 
An introduction to biochemistry 



including the study of pH, water 
bioenergetics, enzymes, and the 
structure, function and metabolism 
of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, 
and nucleic acids. A non-laboratory 
course for students in dental 
hygiene and dietetics. Not open to 
biology majors. 3 credit hours. 

BI 301 Microbiology 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 121 or BI 253 and 
one college course in general chem- 
istry. A history of microbiology and 
a survey of microbial life. Includes 
viruses, rickettsia, bacteria, blue- 
green algae and fungi; their environ- 
ment, growth, reproduction, 
metabolism and relationship to 
man. Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

*BI 303 Cells and Tissues 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: Bl 121 or BI 253. 
Microscopic and chemical struc- 
tures of normal tissues, organs and 
their cellular constituents as related 
to function. Laboratory includes 
microscopic observation, tissue 
staining and slide preparation. 
Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

BI 304 Immunology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: Bl 121 or BI 253 and 
one college course in general chem- 
istry. The nature of antigens and 
antibodies, formation and action of 
the latter, other immunologically 
active components of blood and 
tissues and various immune reac- 
tions. Laboratory emphasizes cur- 
rent antibody methodology. Lab- 
oratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

*BI 305 Developmental Biology 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: Bl 122 or BI 254. A 



survey of developmental biology 
integrating classical embryology with 
modern concepts of cellular develop- 
ment. Laboratory will include exam- 
ination of embryonic serial sections 
as well as modern cellular and molec- 
ular studies of development. Labora- 
tory fee; 4 credit hours. 

BI 308 Cell Biology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 121 or BI 253, 
one college course in general chem- 
istry and one college course in gen- 
eral physics. Basic theories of phys- 
iology as applied to cells. Emphasis 
on cellular structure and function 
as well as cell-cell interactions in 
multicellular organisms. Labor- 
atory will stress practical aspects 
and modern techniques. Labora- 
tory fee; 4 credit hours. 

BI 309-310 Vertebrate Anatomy 
and Physiology with Laboratory 
I and II 

Prerequisites: BI 121-122 or Bl 
253-254. Examination of struc- 
ture and function of vertebrate 
organ systems with an emphasis 
on human systems. Laboratory 
fee; 4 credit hours each term. 

BI 31 1 Molecular Biology with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: BI 121 or BI 253, 
plus CH 115 and 117. An in- 
depth discussion of nucleic acids, 
the flow of information from 
nucleic acids to protein and the 
control of gene activity. Laboratory 
emphasizes the techniques of mod- 
ern molecular biology. Laboratory 
fee; 4 credit hours. 

*BI 315 Nutrition and Disease 

Prerequisites: Bl 215 and either BI 
122 or BI 254. Aspects of diet in 



163 



treating and preventing various 
symptoms and syndromes, dis- 
eases, inherited errors of metabo- 
lism and physiological stress condi- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

*BI 320 Ecology with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 116 and BI 254 
(or BI 122 with permission of 
instructor). VVn investigation of the 
major subdisciplines of ecology 
including organismal, population, 
community ecosystem and land- 
scape ecology. Human impacts and 
environmental management and 
assessment are also considered. 
Laboratory includes designing eco- 
logical studies, field sampling tech- 
niques ecological analysis, using 
global positioning systems in eco- 
logical studies and gathering infor- 
mation on the Internet. Several 
weekend field classes are required. 
Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

BI 350 Invertebrate Zoology 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: BI 122 or BI 254. A 
survey of invertebrate phyla focusing 
on taxonomy, evolutionary relation- 
ships, structure and fianction, physi- 
ological adaptations and life modes. 
Laboratory includes: examination 
of the structure and anatomy of rep- 
resentative taxa from the phyla, 
experiments and observations on 
behavior and responses to varying 
environmental conditions. Labora- 
tory fee; 4 credit hours. 
tBI 433 Medical Microbiology 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 301, CH 1 15. A 
study of the more common dis- 
eases caused by bacteria, fungi and 
viruses, including their etiology, 
transmission, laboratory diagnosis 
and control. Laboratory fee; 
4 credit hours. 



BI 461 Biochemistry 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 201, CH 202, 
CH 203 and CH 204. A survey of 
biochemistry including a discus- 
sion of pH, buffers, water, bioener- 
getics, oxidative phosphorylation, 
enzymology, metabolic regulation, 
and the structure, function and 
metabolism of carbohydrates, pro- 
teins, lipids, nucleic acids, vitamins 
and cofactors. Laboratory exercises 
are primarily designed to concen- 
trate on various experimental tech- 
niques including electrophoresis, 
chromatography, spectrophotome- 
try, centrifugation and enzymolo- 
gy. Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

BI 493 Evaluation of Scientific 
Literature 

Prerequisites: science major with 
junior or senior standing. In this 
seminar-format course the stu- 
dent will be trained to present 
and critically analyze research 
papers. In the first part of the 
semester students will be instruct- 
ed in critically reading and evalu- 
ating primary research articles. In 
the latter part of the semester the 
students will present primary 
research articles from the recent 
and historical literature, and a 
review topic in a seminar format. 
Active class participation in semi- 
nars is mandatory. 3 credit hours. 

BI 498 Internship 

Prerequisite: junior or senior stand- 
ing; biology or environmental sci- 
ence major. Supervised field experi- 
ence for qualified students in areas 
related to biology and/or environ- 
mental science. Minimum of 150 
hours of field experience required. 
3 credit hours. 



BI 501 Protein Biochemistry 
and Enzymology 

Prerequisites: BI 461, CH 201- 
204. First course in a series of 
advanced biochemistry courses; 
examines the relationship between 
protein structure and function. 
Topics include properties of pro- 
teins and amino acids, protein 
folding, enzyme kinetics and 
enzyme regulation. 3 credit hours. 

BI 503 Biochemistry of Nucleic 
Acid 

Prerequisites: BI 461, CH 201- 
204. Second course in the 
advanced biochemistry course 
series; examines cellular metabo- 
lism, the transfer of chemical ener- 
gy and the biosynthesis of amino 
acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids 
and nucleotides. 3 credit hours. 



BI 503 Biochemistry of Nucleic 
Acid 

Prerequisites: BI 461, CH 201- 
204. Final course in the series of 
advanced biochemistry courses; 
examines the biochemistry of 
nucleic acids, their function as 
genetic information and control 
over the expression of that infor- 
mation, nucleic acid-protein inter- 
actions, oncogenes and carcino- 
genes. 3 credit hours. 



*BI 510 Environmental Health 

Prerequisites: BI 310 and a college 
chemistry course. The emphasis is 
on the health effects of environ- 
mental and occupational pollu- 
tants and on the spread and control 
of communicable diseases. Toxico- 
logical and epidemiological tech- 
niques are discussed. 3 credit 
hours. 



Courses 1 64 



BI 5 1 1 Molecular Biology of 
Proteins with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 311 and BI 461. 
Because the techniques for working 
with proteins are basic to the cell 
and molecular biologist and extend 
beyond the understanding of basic 
protein biochemistry, this course 
provides a theoretical understand- 
ing of methods commonly utilized 
for protein/peptide analysis. In the 
laboratory students will isolate pro- 
teins from various tissues or expres- 
sion systems and analyze them by 
one-and two-dimensional poly- 
acrylamide gel electrophoresis. 
Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

BI 513 Molecular Biology of 
Nucleic Acids with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 311 and BI 461. 
Examination of gene expression 
and the techniques available for 
manipulating DNA, RNA and 
protein expression. Course utilizes 
an extensive laboratory component 
to instruct students in the practical 
and technical aspects of working 
with nucleic acids. Laboratory fee; 
4 credit hours. 

BI 520 Bioinformatics 

Prerequisite: BI 311. Students will 
become familiar with uses of com- 
puters in cellular and molecular 
biology, and will be introduced to 
databases that are presently avail- 
able for nucleic acid and protein 
sequences as well as literature cita- 
tions. Students will work with 
modeling software which looks for 
potential secondary structures 
within both protein and DNA 
sequences. 3 credit hours. 

BI 590 Special Topics in 
Biology/Science 

A course(s) covering topics in biol- 



ogy or science which are of special 
or current interest. 1-4 credit 
hours. 

BI 595-596 Laboratory 
Research I and II 

Prerequisite: biology major, con- 
sent of the department. Choice of 
a research topic, literature search, 
planning of experiments, experi- 
mentation and correlation of 
results in a written report, under 
the guidance of a department fac- 
ulty member. Three hours of 
work per week required per credit 
hour. Laboratory fee; 1-6 credit 
hours. 

BI 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: biology major, con- 
sent of the department. Weekly 
conferences with adviser. Three 
hours of work per week required 
per credit hour. Opportunity for 
the student, under the direction of 
a faculty member, to explore an 
area of personal interest. A written 
report of the work carried out is 
required. 1-3 credit hours, maxi- 
mum of 6. 

CULINARY ARTS 

CA 200 Classical Techniques in 
the Culinary Arts 

The student will understand the 
principles of professional cooking 
techniques and the interaction of 
the different ingredients used in 
cooking. The course will be theo- 
retical and will not include tasting 
of food or hands-on assignments. 
The student will follow a series of 
cooking demonstrations done by 
professional chefs, illustrating the 
techniques of classical profession- 
al cooking. 3 credit hours. 



CA 210 Applied Techniques in 
the Culinary Arts 

Prerequisite: CA 200. This course is 
designed to teach the basic classical 
cooking techniques, including the 
basic principles of baking, utilizing a 
hands-on format. The student will 
apply the theories and principles 
acquired in the prerequisite course in 
the context of a professional kitchen 
environment. The class will empha- 
size concepts of efficiency, organiza- 
tion, cleanliness and time manage- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

CA 220 Pastry Making 
Techniques 

This hands-on course will present 
the basic principles of pastry mak- 
ing in the context of a professional 
environment. From basic custards 
to complex doughs and batters, 
students will learn techniques as 
they create many assorted desserts 
and plated pastries. Cake decora- 
tion will be part of the focus of the 
course. 3 credit hours. 

CA 228 Human Resource 
Management for the Hospitality 
and Tourism Industry 

Prerequisite: Permission of adviser. 
Provides the knowledge required to 
formulate and manage effectively 
the human resources in a hospitali- 
ty and tourism related operation. 
Manpower analysis, organizational 
needs, job designs, recruitment 
process and other human resource 
topics are studied. 3 credit hours. 

CA 235 Dining Room 
Management 

This course will provide the knowl- 
edge necessary to fully understand 
dining room management as essen- 
tial to the success of commercial 
food operations. The course content 



165 



complements the production and 
service offered in CA 450 Advanced 
Cuisine Management and Tech- 
niques. Students will practice vari- 
ous service techniques that include 
American, French and Russian serv- 
ice standards as well as having the 
opportunity to demonstrate dining 
room organization, hospitalir)' 
human resource and marketing 
techniques, and dining thematic 
decoration skills. 3 credit hours. 

CA 300 Principles of Baking 

Prerequisite: CA 210. The basic 
principles of baking presented 
within the context of a profession- 
al and profit-generating commer- 
cial kitchen environment. Stu- 
dents will demonstrate these prin- 
ciples through hands-on assign- 
ments in a professional kitchen lab. 
3 credit hours. 

CA 304 Volume Food 
Production and Service 

Prerequisite: CA 200. This course is 
designed to teach the basic principles 
of volume food production and serv- 
ice, which is so critical to the com- 
mercial food industry. Students will 
be preparing meals that are con- 
sumed and analyzed by the public, 
applying the theories and principles 
acquired in the prerequisite course in 
the context of a professional kitchen 
environment. The class will empha- 
size concepts of efficiency, organiza- 
tion, cleanliness and time manage- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

CA 307 Cultural Understanding 
of Food and Cuisine 

The importance of food and cui- 
sine within the context of society. 
It will explore the impact of food 
on the evolution of mankind and 
address issues relating to the 



importance of food in the political 
and economic structure of the 
world. Questions regarding food 
supplies and sources as well as eth- 
ical questions facing mankind in 
the near future will be examined. 
Also explored will be the influ- 
ences and perceptions of food in 
different cultures of the world and 
how those perceptions affect inter- 
cultural understanding. 3 credit 
hours. 

CA 345 Catering and Events 
Management 

A review of a variety of concepts 
germane to catering and event 
management within the context of 
the hospitality industry. Topics 
include themed events, outside 
services, audio-visual and other 
special effects, on and off-premise 
catering and function sales, 
staffing, computer applications in 
banquet management, and general 
event planning. 3 credit hours. 

CA 440 International Food, 
Buffet and Catering 

Prerequisites: CA 210, CA 345. 
Students gain hands-on knowledge 
of the planning, organizing, 
preparing and serving of interna- 
tional food in the context of buffet 
catering service. Several public 
events featuring an international 
theme and food served in a buffet 
setting will be planned, created and 
prepared by student management 
teams under the supervision of a 
chef instructor. Gastronomy con- 
cepts will be studied as they relate 
to the international culture. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

CA 450 Advanced Cuisine 
Management and Technique 
This is the capstone course in food 



production and service. Students 
are provided an opportunity to 
practice advanced culinary tech- 
niques within various international 
and domestic cuisine themes. Stu- 
dents are divided into management 
teams and develop a meal manual 
that includes team mission state- 
ments, pre- and post-meal cost 
analysis, personnel deployment, 
interaction with the dining room 
management teams, standardized 
recipe creations and performance 
appraisal criteria. Student-man- 
agers prepare a dining experience 
that is offered to paying clientele. 3 
credit hours. 

CIVIL 
ENGINEERING 

CE 20 1 Statics 

Prerequisites: PH 150, M 117. 
Composition and resolution of 
forces in two and three dimensions. 
Equilibrium of forces in stationary 
systems. Analysis of trusses, frames 
and machines. Centroids and sec- 
ond moments of areas, distributed 
forces and friction. 3 credit hours. 

CE 202 Strength of Materials I 
Prerequisite: CE 201. Elastic 
behavior of structural elements 
under axial, flexural and torsional 
loading. Shear and bending 
moment diagrams. Stress in and 
deformation of members, includ- 
ing beams, columns and connec- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

CE 203 Elementary Surveying 

Prerequisite: M 115 or permission 
of instructor. Theory and practice 
of surveying measurements using 
tape, level and transit. Field prac- 
tice in traverse surveys and leveling. 



Courses 166 



Traverse adjustment and area com- of transportation systems including 

putations. Adjustment of instru- highways, airports, railroads, rapid 

ments, error analysis. Laboratory transit systems and waterways. 

fee. 3 credit hours. 3 credit hours. 



CE 205 Statics and Strength of 
Materials 

Prerequisites: PH 150, M 117 
(may be taken concurrently). 
Effects and distribution of forces 
on rigid bodies at rest. Various 
types of forces systems, friction, 
center of gravity, centroids and 
moments of inertia. Relation 
between externally applied loads 
and their internal effects on non- 
rigid, deformable bodies. Stress, 
strain, Hooke's law, Poisson's ratio, 
bending and torsion, shear and 
moment diagrams, deflection, 
combined stress and Mohr's circle. 
4 credit hours. 

CE 206 Engineering Geology 

Introduction to relationship 
between geologic processes and 
principles to engineering problems. 
Topics include engineering proper- 
ties of rock as a construction and 
foundation material, soil formation 
and soil profiles and subsurface 
water. 3 credit hours. 

CE 218 Civil Engineering Systems 

Prerequisites: CE 205, CS 110, M 
118. v^n introduction to civil engi- 
neering design. Analyze needs, 
determine capacities and develop 
design alternatives for civil engi- 
neering systems. Structures, water 
and wastewater facilities, geotech- 
nical and transportation systems 
are studied. 3 credit hours. 

CE 301 Transportation 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: M 117. A study of 
planning, design and construction 



CE 302 Building Construction 

Introduction to the legal, architec- 
tural, structural, mechanical and 
electrical aspects of building con- 
struction. Principles of drawing 
and specification preparation and 
cost estimating. 3 credit hours. 

CE 304 Soil Mechanics 

Prerequisite: M 203. Soil classifica- 
tions. Methods of subsurface 
exploration. Design principles are 
related to the potential behavior of 
soils subjected to various loading 
conditions. Seepage analyses. 3 
credit hours. 

CE 306 Hydraulics 

Prerequisite: M 204 or permission 
of instructor. The mechanics of flu- 
ids and fluid flow. Fluid statics, 
laminar and turbulent flow. Ener- 
gy, continuity and momentum. 
Analysis and design of pipes and 
open channels. Orifices and weirs. 
3 credit hours. 

CE 309 Water Resources 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: CE 306. Study of 
principles of water resources engi- 
neering including surface and 
ground water hydrology. Design of 
water supply, flood control and 
hydroelectric reservoirs. Hydraulics 
and design of water supply distri- 
bution and drainage collection sys- 
tems including pump and turbine 
design. Principles of probabihty 
concepts in the design of hydraulic 
structures. General review of water 
and pollution control laws. 3 cred- 
it hours. 



CE 312 Structural Analysis 

Prerequisite: CE 205 or CE 202. 
Basic structural engineering topics 
on the analysis of beams, trusses and 
frames. Topics include: load criteria 
and influence lines; force and 
deflection analysis of beams and 
trusses; analysis of indeterminate 
structures by approximate methods, 
superposition and moment distri- 
bution. Computer applications and 
a semester-long design-analysis 
project requiring engineering deci- 
sions. 3 credit hours (two hours lec- 
ture, two hours discussion). 

CE 315 Environmental 
Engineering 

Prerequisites: CH 115, CH 117, 
CE 309. Introduction to water sup- 
ply and demand. Water quantity 
and quality. Design and operation 
principles of water and wastewater 
treatment, disposal and reuse sys- 
tems. Collection, recycling and dis- 
posal practices of solid wastes. Fun- 
damentals of air pollution and air 
pollution control. 3 credit hours. 

CE 323 Mechanics and Structures 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CE 312 (may be taken 
concurrently). Experiments cover- 
ing mechanics and structural engi- 
neering. The response of metals and 
wood to different loading conditions 
will be examined. Laboratory instru- 
mentation will be studied. Laborato- 
ry procedures, data collection, inter- 
pretation and presentation will be 
emphasized. 2 credit hours. 

CE 327 Soil Mechanics Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CE 304 (may be taken 
concurrently). Experiments and lab- 
oratory testing in geotechnical engi- 
neering. Lab testing includes classi- 
fication, density, hydraulic conduc- 



167 



tivity, shear strength and consolida- 
tion tests. Laboratory procedures 
and data collection, interpretation 
and presentation will be discussed. 
2 credit hours. 

CE 328 Hydraulics and 
Environmental Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CE 315 (may be 
taken concurrently). Fundamentals 
of data collection, analysis and 
presentation. Principles of techni- 
cal report writing. Laboratory 
methods in hydraulics and envi- 
ronmental engineering. Experi- 
ments include pipe and open chan- 
nel flow, analysis of various 
hydraulics structures, pumps and 
other hydraulic machinery, titri- 
metric, gravimetric and instrumen- 
tal methods in water/ wastewater 
quality testing. 2 credit hours. 

CE 398 Internship 

Prerequisite: 60 credit hours 
toward the B.S. degree. A partner- 
ship consisting of the student, fac- 
ulty and employers/organizations 
providing exposure to and partici- 
pation in a working engineering 
environment. The internship will 
translate classroom knowledge to a 
professional work environment, 
and the student will work and learn 
with practicing engineers while 
gaining professional experience. A 
minimum of 300 hours perform- 
ing related engineering duties is 
required. No credit. 

CE 401 Foundation Design and 
Construction 

Prerequisite: CE 304 or consent of 
instructor. Application of soil 
mechanics to foundation design, 
stability, settlement. Selection of 
foundation type-shallow footings, 
deep foundations, pile founda- 



tions, mat foundations. Subsurface 
exploration. 3 credit hours. 

CE 403 City Planning 

Prerequisite: senior status or per- 
mission of instructor. Engineering, 
social, economic, political and legal 
aspects of city planning. Emphasis 
placed on case studies of communi- 
ties in Connecticut zoning. Princi- 
ples and policies of redevelopment. 
3 credit hours. 

CE 404 Water and Wastewater 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: CE 315. Physical, 
chemical and biological aspects of 
water quality and pollution con- 
trol. Study of unit operations and 
processes of water, wastewater and 
wastewater residuals treatment. 
Emphasis on hydraulic and process 
design of water pollution control 
facilities. 3 credit hours. 

CE 405 Indeterminate Structures 

Prerequisites: ME 307 or CE 312, 
CS 110, ME 204. The analysis of 
statically indeterminate structures. 
Topics include approximate meth- 
ods, moment distribution, conjugate 
beam, energy methods, influence 
lines and an introduction to matrix 
methods. Computer applications 
and a project requiring structural 
engineering decisions. 3 credit hours. 

CE 407 Professional and Ethical 
Practice of Engineering 

Prerequisite: senior status or per- 
mission of instructor. Principles of 
engineer-client, engineer society 
and owner-contractor relationships 
examined from ethical, legal and 
professional viewpoints. Examina- 
tion of codes of ethics and prepara- 
tion of contract documents. 3 cred- 
it hours. 



CE 408 Steel Design and 
Construction 

Prerequisite: CE 312. Analysis, 
design and construction of steel 
structures. Topics include tension, 
compression and flexural members; 
connections; members subjected to 
torsion; beam-columns; fabrica- 
tion, erection and shop practice. 
Designs will be based on Load 
Resistance Factor Design (LRFD). 
3 credit hours (two hours lecture, 
two hours discussion) . 

CE 409 Concrete Design and 
Construction 

Prerequisite: CE 312. Analysis and 
design of reinforced concrete 
beams, columns, slabs, footings, 
retaining walls. Fundamentals of 
engineering shop drawings. 3 cred- 
it hours (two hours lecture, two 
hours discussion). 

CE 410 Land Surveying 

Prerequisite: CE 203 or consent of 
instructor. A study of boundary 
control and legal aspects of land 
surveying including deed research, 
evidence of boundary location, 
deed description and riparian 
rights. Theory of measurement and 
errors, position precision, state 
plane coordinate systems, photo- 
gammetry. 3 credit hours. 

CE 411 Highway Engineering 
Prerequisite: CE 301 or consent of 
instructor. Highway economics 
and financing. Study of highway 
planning, geometric design and 
capacity. Pavement and drainage 
design. 3 credit hours. 

CE 412 Wood Engineering 
Prerequisite: CE 205 or CE 202. 
Study of the growth and structure of 
wood and their influence on 



Courses 168 



strength and durability, preservation 
and fire protection. The analysis and 
design of structural members of 
wood using the Allowable Stress 
Design method (ASD) including 
beams, columns and connections. 
The design of wood structures. Dis- 
cussion of Load Resistance Factor 
Design (LRFD). 3 credit hours (two 
hours lecture, two hours discussion). 

CE 413 Masonry Engineering 

Prerequisite: CE 205. The design 
and analysis of brick and concrete 
masonry non-reinforced and rein- 
forced structures. Strength, thermal, 
fire and sound characteristics, testing 
and specifications. 3 credit hours. 

CE 414 Route Surveying 

Prerequisite: CE 203. A continua- 
tion of elementary surveying cov- 
ering principles of route survey- 
ing, stadia surveys, practical 
astronomy, aerial photography, 
adjustments of instruments. Field 
problems related to classroom 
designs. 3 credit hours. 

CE 415 Traffic Engineering 

Prerequisite: CE 301 or junior sta- 
tus. Traffic flow theory including 
data collection, data analysis, free 

ways, multilane highways, signal- 
ized and unsignalized intersections, 
intersection signal coordination. 
Students will be taught how to use 
several computer programs to ana- 
lyze traffic flow along roadways. 
Projects will deal with actual loca- 
tions in the area. 3 credit hours. 

CE 450-454 Special Topics 

Selected topics of special or current 
interest in the field of civil engi- 
neering. 1-3 credit hours. 



CE 500 Senior Project I 

Prerequisite: senior status. An intro- 
duction to project planning and 
presentation. This course will pre- 
pare the student for professional 
practice by teaching organizational 
skills, scheduling, technical writing 
for a lay audience and oral presenta- 
tion. Students will begin working on 
their senior design project and use 
this preliminary work in their course 
assignments. Oral and written pre- 
sentations will be given to update 
the class on the progress of the proj- 
ect. 3 credit hours. 

CE501 Senior Project II 

Prerequisite: CE 500. Supervised 
individual or group project. The 
project may be the preparation of a 
set of contract documents for the 
construction of a civil engineering 
facility, research work with a report 
or a project approved by the facul- 
ty adviser. 3 credit hours. 

CE 505 Solid Waste Management 

Prerequisite: CE 315. Characteris- 
tics, volumes, collection and dis- 
posal of solid waste and refuse. 
Design of processing, recycling and 
recovery equipment, landfill design 
and operation; resource recovery; 
incineration. 3 credit hours. 

CE 520 Engineering Hydrology 

Prerequisite: CE 309. Theory, 
methods and applications of 
hydrology to contemporary engi- 
neering problems. Methods of data 
collection and analysis as well as 
design procedures are presented for 
typical engineering problems. Spe- 
cific topics to be considered within 
this framework include the rain- 
fall/runoff process, hydro graph 
analysis, hydrologic routing, urban 
runoff, storm water models and 



flood frequency analysis. 3 credit 
hours. 

CE 523 Open Channel Hydraulics 

Prerequisite: CE 309. Basic theo- 
ries of open channel flow will be 
presented and corresponding equa- 
tions developed. Methods of calcu- 
lating uniform/steady flow; gradu- 
ally varied flow; and rapid, spatial- 
ly varied, unsteady flow will be 
investigated. Flow through bridge 
piers, transitions and culverts; 
backwater curves and the design of 
open channels. 3 credit hours. 

CE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor 
and department chair. Opportun- 
ity for the student to explore an 
area of interest under the direction 
of a faculty member. Course must 
be initiated by the student and 
have the approval of the faculty 
adviser and chair. 1-3 credit hours. 



COMPUTER 
ENGINEERING 



CEN 398 Internship 

Prerequisite: 60 credit hours toward 
the B.S. degree. A partnership con- 
sisting of the student, faculty and 
employers/organizations providing 
exposure to and participation in a 
working engineering environment. 
The internship will translate class- 
room knowledge to a professional 
work environment, and the student 
will work and learn with practicing 
engineers while gaining profession- 
al experience. A minimum of 300 
hours performing related engineer- 
ing duties is required. No credit. 

CEN 457 Design Preparation 
Prerequisite: senior standing. This 



169 



course provides the student time 
and guidance in selecting a topic for 
the senior design course (CEN 458) 
which follows this one. Suitable 
design projects may be suggested by 
the student, the faculty or contacts 
in industry. Projects involving both 
hardware and software are encour- 
aged. Each student carries out a lit- 
erature search on the topic, prepares 
a written proposal with a plan of 
action for the project, obtains 
approval from the faculty adviser, 
makes oral reports of work in 
progress and presents a formal proj- 
ect proposal. 3 credit hours. 

CEN 458 Senior Design 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CEN 457. Students 
complete the design planned in 
CEN 457. This course provides 
students with experience at a pro- 
fessional level with engineering 
projects that involve analysis, 
design, construction of prototypes 
and evaluation of results. Projects 
involving both hardware and soft- 
ware are encouraged. A final report 
presentation and a formal written 
report are required. 3 credit hours. 



CHEMISTRY 

CH 103 Introduction to 
General Chemistry 

Introductory course for students 
without a high school chemistry 
background. Fundamentals of 
chemistry including such topics as 
elements, compounds, nomencla- 
ture and practical applications. 
Intended primarily for nonscience 
and nonengineering majors. CH 
104 is taken concurrently with CH 
103. 3 credit hours. 



CH 104 Introduction to General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 103. Experi- 
ments include systems of measure- 
ment, the measurement of physical 
properties, determination of per- 
centage of composition, chemical 
formulas, and chemical reactions. 1 
credit hour. 

CH 105 Introduction to General 
and Organic Chemistry with 
Laboratory 

Fundamentals of general and organ- 
ic chemistry: atomic structure and 
properties of compounds, stoi- 
chiometry and reactions, energy 
relationships, states of matter, solu- 
tions, hydrocarbons and classes of 
organic compounds. 4 credit hours. 

CH 115 General Chemistry I 

Prerequisite: High school algebra 
or M 109, CH 103, CH 105 or 
one unit of high school chemistry 
or written qualifying exam. Brief 
review of fundamentals including 
stoichiometry, atomic structure 
and chemical bonding. Other top- 
ics include thermochemistry, gas 
laws, properties of solution and 
inorganic coordination com- 
pounds. Intended primarily for sci- 
ence/engineering majors. CH 117 
is taken concurrently with CH 
1 15. 3 credit hours. 

CH 116 General Chemistry II 

Prerequisites: CH 115, CH 117 or 
the equivalent. Topics include 
nuclear chemistry; rates of chemi- 
cal reactions; chemical equilibria 
including pH, acid-base, common 
ion effect, buffers and solubility 
products; thermodynamics; an 
introduction to organic and bio- 
chemistry. Problems in each area 
include environmental applica- 



tions. CH 1 18 is taken concurrent- 
ly with CH 1 16. 3 credit hours. 

CH 117 General Chemistry I 
Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 115. Experi- 
ments include percent composi- 
tion, stoichiometry, heats of reac- 
tion, gas laws, molecular model 
building and coUigative properties 
of solutions. 1 credit hour. 

CH 118 General Chemistry II 
Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 1 16. Experi- 
ments include quantitative meas- 
urements of chemical reaction 
rates, equilibrium constants, the 
common ion effect, pH, buffers, 
electrochemical cells and simple 
organic synthesis. 1 credit hour. 

CH 201-202 Organic 
Chemistry I and II 

Prerequisites: CH 116, CH 118. 
Common reactions of aliphatic and 
aromatic chemistry with emphasis 
on fiinctional groups and reaction 
mechanisms. CH 203 and CH 204 
are taken concurrently with CH 
201-202. 3 credit hours each term. 



CH 203-204 Organic Chemistry 
I and II Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 201-202. 
Some of the techniques, reactions, 
and syntheses commonly employed 
in the organic chemistry laboratory 
are covered on microscale level 
including qualitative organic analy- 
sis and FTIR analysis. 1 credit hour 
each term. 

CH 211 Quantitative Analysis 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 116, CH 118. 
Theory and applications of acid- 
base, solubility, complex-formation 



Courses 1 70 



and oxidation-reduction equilibria 
to quantitative chemical analysis; 
introduction to statistics and evalu- 
ation of results. Laboratory analysis 
of samples by gravimetric and vol- 
umetric methods. 4 credit hours. 

CH 22 1 Instrumental Methods 
of Analysis with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 201, CH 203, 
CH 211 or permission of instructor. 
Theory and applications of various 
instrumental methods with empha- 
sis on ultraviolet, visible, atomic 
absorption, fluorescence, infrared 
and nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; 
gas and liquid chromatography; and 
potentiometry. Laboratory analysis 
of samples by methods discussed in 
the lecture. 4 credit hours. 

CH 321-322 Plastics and 
Polymer Chemistry I and II 

Prerequisites: CH 116, CH 118, 
CH 202, CH 204. All phases of 
the plastics and polymers field, 
including the chemistry involved, 
methods of production, physical 
properties and the uses of specific 
polymers. 3 credit hours each term. 



CH 331-332 Physical 
Chemistry I and II 
Prerequisites: CH 116, PH 205, M 
203 (may be taken concurrently). 
Kinetic theory of gases, thermody- 
namics, phase equilibria, transport 
and surface phenomena, kinetics, 
quantum mechanics, atomic and 
molecular spectroscopy. 3 credit 
hours each term. 

CH 333-334 Physical Chemistry 
I and II Laboratory 

To be taken with CH 331-332. 
Laboratory training in vacuum line 



techniques and real time collection 
of temperature, pressure and spec- 
trophotometric data by microcom- 
puter. Experiments include: diffu- 
sion, velocity and heat capacities of 
gases; calorimetry; phase diagrams 
of mixtures; electro-chemical prop- 
erties, kinetics of fast reactions, 
enzyme and oscillating reactions; 
rotational-vibrational spectroscopy. 
1 credit hour each term. 

CH 34 1 Synthetic Methods 
in Chemistry 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 204, 
CH 221. A one-semester laboratory 
course covering the synthesis and 
characterization of inorganic and 
organic compounds. Performance 
of a variety of reactions and chemi- 
cal manipulations with a focus on 
advanced laboratory techniques: 
handling air-sensitive materials, use 
of cryogenic conditions, separation 
and purefication, isolation of natu- 
ral products, experiment design, 
and safety procedures. A selection of 
methods for: transition metal, 
main-group element, and aromatic 
and aliphatic organic syntheses. 
Characterization of compounds by 
UV, IR, NMR, mass spectrometry 
and other instrumental methods. 

Eight hours of laboratory per week. 
4 credit hours. 

CH 411 Chemical Literature 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 204, 
CH 332. Acquaints the student 
with the chemical literature and its 
use. Assignments include library 
searches and online STN search- 
ing. 1 credit hour. 
CH 412 Seminar 
Prerequisite: CH 411. The student 
researches a specific current topic 
in chemical research or applied 



chemistry and presents a formal 
seminar to the faculty and stu- 
dents. 1 credit hour. 

CH 451 Thesis with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 204, 
CH 211, CH 221, CH 332. An 
original investigation in the labora- 
tory and/or library under the guid- 
ance of a member of the depart- 
ment. A final thesis report is sub- 
mitted. 2 credit hours. 

CH 452-455 Special Topics 
in Chemistry 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
In-depth study of topics chosen 
from areas of particular and cur- 
rent interest to chemistry and 
chemical engineering students. 
1-4 credit hours. 

CH 471 Industrial Chemistry 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 211, 
CH 221, CH 332. A course to 
bridge the gap from the academic 
to the industrial world. Topics 
include material accounting, ener- 
gy accounting, chemical trans- 
port, reactor design, process devel- 
opment and control. 3 credit 
hours. 



CH 501 Advanced Organic 
Chemistry 

Prerequisites: CH 202, CH 204. 
Topics include chemical bonding 
and molecular structure, and pri- 
mary mechanisms of various reac- 
tions such as substitutions, elimi- 
nations, rearrangements, and sym- 
metry. 3 credit hours. 

CH 521 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CH 331. Corequisite: 
CH 332. Review of atomic struc- 



171 



ture and introduction to group the- 
ory and symmetry. The chemistry of 
transition metal complexes and 
organometalHc compounds with 
emphasis on bonding and structure, 
physical and chemical properties 
and reaction mechanisms including 
catalysis and photochemistry. 
Bioinorganic chemistry and ionic 
solids will be covered as time per- 
mits. 3 credit hours. 

CH 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
Opportunity for the student under 
the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest. This 
course may be used to do prelimi- 
nary work on the topic studied for 
Thesis (CH 451). 1-4 credit hours. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CJ 100 Introduction to 
Criminal Justice 

Survey of criminal justice system 
with emphasis on prosecution, cor- 
rections and societal reaction to 
offenders. Retribution, rehabilita- 
tion, deterrence and incapacitation 
serve as generic frames of reference 
and theoretical points of departure 
for analyzing the dispositional and 
correctional processes. The course 
focuses on the process-from the 
police and prosecution through the 
courts; from the courts through the 
correctional system. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 102 Criminal Law 

The scope, purpose and definitions 
of substantive criminal law: crimi- 
nal liability, major elements of 
statutory and common law offens- 
es (with some reference to the 
Connecticut Penal Code) and sig- 



nificant defenses. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 105 Introduction to Security 

General survey of the major histor- 
ical, legal and practical develop- 
ments and problems of security. 
Course stresses the components, 
organization and objectives of 
security, the trend toward profes- 
sion-alization, the role of security 
in the public and private sectors 
and its relationship to manage- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 201 Principles of Criminal 
Investigation 

Introduction to criminal investiga- 
tion in the field. Conducting the 
crime scene search, interview of 
witnesses, interrogation of sus- 
pects, methods of surveillance and 
the special techniques employed in 
particular kinds of investigation. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 203 Security Administration 

An overview of security systems 
found in retail, industrial and gov- 
ernmental agencies, the legal 
framework for security operations, 
and the administrative and proce- 
dural processes in security manage- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 204 Forensic Photography 
with Laboratory 

Introduction to basic techniques, 
material and other aspects of crime 
scene photographs. Theory and 
practice of photographic image for- 
mation and recordings. Laboratory 
exercises with emphasis on homi- 
cide, sex offenses, arson and acci- 
dent photograph techniques. Labo- 
ratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CJ 205 Interpersonal Relations 

Prerequisite: Pill. Theories, con- 



ceptual models and research related 
to interpersonal relations. Topics 
include reciprocal theory, attitudes 
and labeling theory. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 209 Correctional 
Treatment Programs 

Prerequisites: CJ 100. Various 
treatment modalities employed in 
the rehabilitation of offenders. 
Field visits to various correctional 
treatment facilities such as half-way 
houses and community-based 
treatment programs. 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 210 Ethnic and Gender 
Issues in Criminal Justice 

Introduction to issues of diversity 
within the criminal justice system. 
The course will focus on prejudice 
and discrimination along with 
other special problems experienced 
by women, gays and various ethnic 
and racial minority groups in deal- 
ing with the criminal justice sys- 
tem. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 215 Introduction to 
Forensic Science 

Prerequisite: Cj 201. A classroom 
lecture/discussion session and a 
laboratory period. Topics include 
the recognition, identification, 
individualization and evaluation of 
physical evidence such as hairs, 
fibers, chemicals, narcotics, blood, 
semen, glass, soil, fingerprints, 
documents, firearms and tool 
marks. Laboratory fee; 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 217 Criminal Procedure I 
Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 102. An 
inquiry into the nature and scope 
of the U.S. Constitution as it 
relates to criminal procedures. 
Areas discussed include the law of 
search and seizure, arrests, confes- 



Courses 172 



sions and identification. 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 218 Criminal Procedure II 
and Evidence 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 102. 
Legal doctrines employed in con- 
trolling the successive stages of the 
criminal process. Rules of law relat- 
ed to wiretapping and lineups, pre- 
trial decision making, juvenile jus- 
tice and trial. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 220 Legal Issues 
in Corrections 

Prerequisites: junior status and CJ 
100, CJ 217. Examination of the 
legal foundations of correctional 
practice and review of recent judi- 
cial decisions which are altering the 
correctional environment. An 
analysis of the factors and forces 
which are creating a climate of sig- 
nificant reform in corrections. 3 
credit hours. 

CJ 22 1 Juvenile Justice System 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, P 111. 
Analysis of stages and decisions 
made at critical junctures of the 
juvenile justice process. Topics 
include an analysis of Supreme 
Court treatment of juvenile justice 
issues and the ability of the juvenile 
justice system to respond to juve- 
nile crime. Focus on the processing 
of juveniles through the system, 
and the special problems unique to 
juvenile justice. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 226 Industrial Security 
Prerequisite: CJ 105. Concepts of 
security as it integrates with indus- 
trial management systems present- 
ed along with industrial security 
requirements and standards, alarms 
and surveillance devices, animate 



security approaches, costing, plan- 
ning and engineering. Principles of 
safety practices and regulations, fire 
prevention, property conservation, 
occupational hazards and personal 
safeguards. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 227 Fingerprints 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CJ 201, CJ 215. The 
genetics and mathematical theory 
relating to fingerprints, chemical 
and physical methods used in 
developing latent fingerprints, and 
major systems of fingerprint classi- 
fication. Laboratory fee; 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 250 Scientific Methods in 
Human Services 

Prerequisites: CJ/HMS 100, M 
109 or M 127. Introduction to the 
use of scientific methods and logic 
in the human service professions. 
Topics studied will include science 
and the scientific approach to 
problem solving, the logic of causal 
inference, problem and hypothesis 
formulation, the use of experimen- 
tal designs, laboratory methods, 
survey research methods and meas- 
urement issues in human services. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 251 Quantitative Applications 
in Human Services 

Prerequisite: CJ/HMS 250. Intro- 
duction to the use of quantitative 
analysis through study of the basic 
statistical tools and databases used 
in human services. Emphasis will 
be on applied applications of quan- 
titative methods in service delivery 
systems. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 300 History of 
Criminal Justice 



Prerequisite: CJ 100. The develop- 
ment of the major CJ elements 
including police, prisons, proba- 
tion and parole. Significant histor- 
ical events and philosophical pos- 
tulates as they pertain to this devel- 
opment. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 301 Group Dynamics 
in Criminal Justice 

Prerequisites: CJ 205, P 111. 
Analysis of theory and applied 
methods in the area of group 
process. Focus on both individual 
roles and group development as 
they relate to criminal justice 
issues. Experiential exercises are 
included. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 303-304 Forensic Science 
Laboratory I and II 

Prerequisite: CJ 215. Specific exam- 
ination of topics and laboratory test- 
ing procedures introduced in CJ 
215. In the classroom, laboratory 
procedures are outlined and dis- 
cussed. Identification and individu- 
alization of evidence; casting of hairs 
and fibers for microscopic identifi- 
cation; electrophoretic separation of 
blood enzymes. Laboratory fee; 3 
credit hours each term. 



CJ 306 Security 
Problems Seminar 

Prerequisites: CJ 105, CJ 203. An 
analysis of special problem areas 
including college and university 
campuses, hospitals, hotel/motels, 
etc. Also, special problems con- 
cerning computer protection, bank 
security, executive personnel pro- 
tection, credit cards, case law and 
legal aspects, control of proprietary 
information and white collar 
crime. 3 credit hours. 



173 



CJ 310 Criminal 
Justice Institutions 

Prerequisite: CJ 300. Examination 
of the societal and psychological 
imphcations of various types of 
institutions. Inchides both social 
and total institutions and exam- 
ines their similarities and dissimi- 
larities with particular emphasis 
on their implications for criminal 
justice. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 3 11 Criminology 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, P 111, SO 
113. An examination of principles 
and concepts of criminal behavior; 
criminological theory; the nature, 
extent and distribution of crime; 
legal and societal reaction to crime. 
3 credit hours. (Same course as 
SO 311.) 

CJ 312 The Police and 
Crime Control 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. The changing 
role, perspectives and operational 
strategies of policing as they relate to 
the crime control function of the 
police. The focus will be on innova- 
tive, promising, emerging or "futur- 
istic" and often highly controversial 
police practices, programs and 
approaches to law enforcement as 
well as on selective community 
crime prevention efforts undertaken 
in conjunction with, under the aus- 
pices of or independendy from the 
police department. Special attention 
will be devoted to police brutality, 
the use of deadly force and its con- 
sequences, including high-speed 
police pursuits. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 315 Domestic Violence 

Introduction to the study of family 
violence issues. Typology and histo- 
ry of family abuse, responses to fam- 



ily violence and public policy issues 
will be the focus of study. Issues in 
domestic violence, sexual abuse, 
emotional abuse, elder abuse, child 
abuse, treatment approaches and 
legal guidelines. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 333 Police Civil Liability 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 102, CJ 
217 or permission of instructor. 
Introductory overview of types of 
civil liability lawsuits brought 
against law enforcement officers. 
Exploration of ways to relieve the 
pressures of this potential liability. 
Emphasis placed on negligence and 
intentional torts. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 340 Comparative 
Criminal Justice 

AflPords students the opportunity to 
explore a number of foreign systems 
with emphasis on policing. Different 
perspectives of crime problems will 
be looked at through the prism of 
foreign culture. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 350 Leadership and 
Management in Human Services 

Prerequisite: junior or senior stand- 
ing. An in-depth view of leadership 
and management skills in a variety 
of criminal justice and human serv- 
ice settings. Special focus will 
include problem solving and quality 
control in agencies. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 400 Criminal Justice 
Problems Seminar 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 300. An 
examination of theoretical and 
philosophical issues affecting the 
administration of justice: the prob- 
lems of reconciling legal and theo- 
retical ideals in various sectors of 
the criminal justice system with the 
realities of practice. 3 credit hours. 



CJ 402 Police in Society 

Prerequisites: CJ 100, CJ 300. 
Acquaints students with the major 
developments and trends of polic- 
ing in a free society. Emphasis 
placed on American police and the 
role of the police in a democracy. 
Further emphasis placed on the 
examination of the interactions 
between the police and the commu- 
nities they serve. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 403 Advanced Forensic 
Science I with Laboratory 

In-depth examination of blood 
grouping procedures for red cell 
antigens, isoenzymes and serum 
proteins, identification and typing 
of body fluids and their stains; col- 
lection, processing and handling 
of biological materials in casework. 
Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

CJ 404 Advanced Forensic 
Science II with Laboratory 
In-depth examination of several 
subjects in modern criminalistics, 
including hair and fiber analysis 
and comparison, arson accelerants 
and explosives residues, glass com- 
parisons and forensic chemistry. 
Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

CJ 408 Child and Family 
Intervention Strategies 
Prerequisites: P HI, P 336, CJ 
205, CJ 209, CJ 301. This course 
is designed to introduce students to 
the application of investigation and 
critical thinking strategies to the 
problems of child abuse, neglect 
and domestic violence. Assessment, 
decision-making and case manage- 
ment strategies will be explored. 3 
credit hours. 



Courses 1 74 



CJ 409 Adult Intervention 
Strategies 

Prerequisite: CJ/HMS 409. A 
comprehensive investigation of 
mental health and correctional sys- 
tems, including residential and 
community-based treatment. Par- 
ticular attention will be placed on 
strategies for dealing with resistant 
clients. Students will develop criti- 
cal thinking skills relating to best 
practices in a variety of settings. 3 
credit hours. 

CJ 410 Legal Issues in 
Private Security 

Examines legal problems affecting 
the private security industry and 
ways to prevent loss from litigation. 
Includes intentional torts, negli- 
gence, agency, contracts and law of 
arrest, search and seizure, and inter- 
rogation by citizens. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 4 1 1 Victimology 

Introduction to the principles and 
concepts of victimology, analysis of 
victimization patterns and trends, 
and responses to criminal victim- 
ization. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 412 Substance Abuse and 
Addictive Behavior 

Course provides an overview of 
drug use and addictive behavior as 
it relates to law enforcement and 
correctional treatment issues; cur- 
rent estimate is that 80-90% of 
violent crime in the United States 
is correlated with alcohol and drug 
use. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 413 Victim Law and Service 
Administration 

Prerequisite: CJ 411. Introduces 
the study of crime victims' legal 
rights and the services system avail- 
able to crime victims within the 



criminal justice system and in 
other settings. Topics include vic- 
tim assistance programs from law 
enforcement through the courts 
and corrections systems as well as 
community-based advocacy and 
support. This study of victim serv- 
ices is integrated with a focus on 
the underlying legal structure of 
crime victim statutory and consti- 
tutional rights including notifica- 
tion, participation, protection and 
financial remedies (e.g., restitution, 
compensation and civil litigation) 
as well as other rights. Practical 
program management, evaluation 
and funding issues are incorporat- 
ed. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 414 Legal Rights of 
Crime Victims 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. Introduces 
the study of crime victims' rights 
within the justice system. Topics 
include victim-witness programs, 
victim impact statements, victim 
notification laws, compensation 
schemes and victims' rights legisla- 
tion. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 4 1 6 Seminar in 
Forensic Science 

Prerequisites: CJ 201, CJ 215. An 
examination and evaluation of cur- 
rent issues in the law enforcement 
science field. Course aids in under- 
standing how various physical evi- 
dence can be utilized as an inves- 
tigative tool. Also, a review of mod- 
ern analytical techniques and their 
application in law enforcement sci- 
ence. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 420 Advanced 
Investigative Techniques 

Prerequisites: CJ 201, CJ 215, CJ 
218 and junior/senior standing. An 
in-depth study of the principles 



and techniques associated with the 
collection and documenting of 
information obtained during an 
investigation. Addresses the many 
sources of information, utilization of 
informants, the use of hypnosis, 
polygraph, advanced strategies for 
interviews and investigations, and 
provides documentation techniques. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 440 Death Investigation — 
Scene to Court 

Prerequisites: senior standing as 
Criminal Justice or Forensic Science 
major plus CJ 201, CJ 215 and CJ 
4 1 5 or permission of instructor. An 
in-depth study of the principles and 
techniques associated with investi- 
gating homicides; suicides; and acci- 
dental, natural or equivocal deaths. 
While considering the sociological, 
psychological and legal aspects typi- 
cally found in these cases, the 
process will take the student from 
the scene to the court— criminal or 
civil. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 450-454 Special Topics 

A study of selected issues of partic- 
ular interest to the students and 
instructor. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 498 Research Project 

Prerequisite: consent of the depart- 
ment chair. The student carries out 
an original research project in a 
criminal justice setting and reports 
the findings. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 500A Criminal Justice 
Pre-Internship 

Prerequisite: senior standing in CJ. 
A course designed to assist students 
to gain full understanding and 
appreciation of the internship 
experience. Students will be ac- 
quainted with work rules in crimi- 



175 



nal justice agencies and helped to 
select the correct internship for 
their particular interest. A key issue 
will be extended discussion of 
criminal justice ethics as related to 
the various aspects of the criminal 
justice system. Students are re- 
quired to complete the CJ 500A 
course prior to enrolling in the CJ 
500B internship experience. 3 
credit hours. 

CJ 500B Criminal Justice 
Internship 

Prerequisite: CJ 500A and consent 
of department chairperson. Pro- 
vides academically monitored field 
experience with selected federal, 
state or local criminal justiced 
agencies with faculty supervision, 
guidance and review. The course 
will include a required classroom 
discussion meeting(s) to facilitate a 
better understanding of the issues 
presented during the internship 
experience. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 502 Forensic Science 
Internship 

Prerequisite: junior/senior stand- 
ing. Provides academically super- 
vised, real-world experience for 
forensic science majors. The 
internship usually constitutes the 
only practical experience in an 
actual casework lab that students 
have during the forensic science 
program, and it provides a valuable 
asset to the student in the job mar- 
ket. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 520 Computer Crime: 
Legal Issues and Investigation 
Procedures 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
An overview of computer crime and 
the procedures forensic computing 



specialists, law enforcement investi- 
gators and prosecutors must invoke 
to prosecute computer criminals 
successfully. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 522 Computers, Technology 
and Criminal Justice Information 
Management Systems 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
An introduction to information sys- 
tems used within the criminal jus- 
tice system. Overview of existing 
criminal justice information systems 
with implications for future needs. 
Analysis of the impact of science 
and technology on criminal justice 
agencies. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 523 Internet Vulnerabilities 
and Criminal Activity 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
This course provides appropriate 
strategies for the proper documen- 
tation, preparation and presenta- 
tion of investigations involving the 
Internet and familiarizes students 
with legal information which 
impacts Internet investigations. 
3 credit hours. 

CJ 524 Network Security, Data 
Protection and Telecommunication 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A 
comprehensive introduction to net- 
work security issues, concepts and 
technologies. The core technologies 
of access control, cryptography, dig- 
ital signatures, authentication, net- 
work firewalls and network security 
services are reviewed along with 
issues of security policy and risk 
management. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 525 Information Systems 
Threats, Attacks and Defenses 

This course provides an overview of 
the actors, motives and methods 



used in the commission of comput- 
er-related crimes and describes the 
methods used by organizations to 
prevent, detect and respond to these 
crimes. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 526 Firewall and Secure 
Enterprise Computing 

This course covers theory and prac- 
tices of Internet firewalls and many 
of the details and vulnerabilities of 
the IP and embedded protocol 
sites. In the laboratory and on-line 
portion of the course students will 
construct, deploy and test a real 
firewall against common Internet 
attacks. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 527 Internet Investigations 
and Audit-Based Computer 
Forensics 

Theory and techniques for tracking 
attackers across the Internet and 
gaining forensic information from 
computer systems. The course 
includes case studies of Internet- 
based crimes and addresses limits 
of forensic techniques. 3 credit 
hours. 

CJ 528 Computer Viruses and 
Malicious Code 

This course addresses theoretical 
and practical issues surrounding 
computer viruses. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 529 Practical Issues in 
Cryptography 

Practical issues in cryptography, 
including examples of current his- 
torical cryptography and stegona- 
graphic systems; major types of 
cryptosystems and cryptanalytic 
techniques, and how they operate; 
hands-on experience with current 
cryptographic technology. 3 credit 
hours. 



Courses 1 76 



CJ 540 Computer Applications in 
Research and Program Evaluation 

Prerequisites: CJ/HMS 250, 
CJ/HMS 251, M 109 or Ml 27. 
An advanced course reviewing 
major statistical packages and mod- 
els employed in the analysis of 
criminal justice and human servic- 
es data. Students will learn analyt- 
ic techniques using real data sets. 
Program evaluation needs will be 
studied and tested. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 541 Problem Solving: 
Planning, Analysis and 
Evaluation 

Prerequisite: senior standing. An 
advanced seminar utilizing the 
skills developed in preceding 
research methods and program 
evaluation courses. The focus will 
be on integrating and developing 
an effective, yet flexible problem 
solving schema for criminal justice 
and human service agencies. Quan- 
titative and qualitative solutions 
will be stressed to fit the appropri- 
ate problem. Field problems will be 
solicited. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 555 Crime Prevention 
Through Environmental Design 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. Analysis of the- 
ory and applied methods of crime 
prevention using environmental 
design methods. Experiential exer- 
cises are included. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 556 Problem-Oriented 
Policing 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. An in-depth 
examination of problem-oriented 
policing, including examination of 
the SARA model, specialized tac- 
tics and methods of community 
analyses. 3 credit hours. 



CJ 557 Crime Mapping and 
Analysis 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. Survey of CIS 
research and applications in the 
field of public safety, including 
analysis of hot spots, density pat- 
terns and forecasts of crime pat- 
terns. 3 credit hours. 



CJ 558 Leadership Issues in 
Policing 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. Study of lead- 
ership within modern police organ- 
izations. Experiential exercises are 
included. 3 credit hours. 

CJ 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of depart- 
ment chair. An opportunity for the 
student, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore and 
acquire competence in a special 
area of interest. 1-3 credit hours. 

CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING 

CM 201 Fimdamentals of 
Chemical Engineering I 

Prerequisites: CH 116, E 105, 
ES 108, M 117. Corequisite: PH 
150. An introduction to the profes- 
sion of chemical engineering and 
the application of fundamental 
chemical, physical and mathemati- 
cal concepts to the solution of 
chemical engineering problems. 
Topics include data analysis, physi- 
cal property estimation, material 
balances, stoichiometry with sin- 
gle/multiple reactions and recycle 
calculations. 3 credit hours. 

CM 202 Fundamentals of 
Chemical Engineering II 

Prerequisite: CM 201. A continua- 



tion of CM 201 with emphasis on 
the use of energy balances for both 
nonreactive and reactive processes. 
Combined material and energy 
balances are used in solving a vari- 
ety of chemical engineering prob- 
lems. 3 credit hours. 

CM 301 Transport Phenomena 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: CM 202, E 110, M 
203. A unified introduction to 
momentum, heat and mass trans- 
fer. Use of macroscopic balances, 
applications in fluid mechanics, 
thermal energy transport and mass 
transfer operations, particularly 
absorption processes. Application 
of transport phenomena principles 
to systems involving momentum, 
heat and mass transfer with empha- 
sis on understanding system and 
equipment operation. 3 credit 
hours. 

CM 310 Transport Operations I 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: M 204, CM 301. 
Application of transport phenome- 
na principles to systems involving 
momentum, heat and mass trans- 
fer with emphasis on equipment 
design. Use of microscopic and 
macroscopic balances, continuity 
and Navier-Stokes principles and 
turbulent flow theories to develop 
mathematical models of physical 
systems with applications in fluid 
mechanics and thermal energy 
transport. Topics include design 
of piping systems, flow instru- 
ments, filters, heat exchangers, 
evaporators and others of current 
interest. Laboratory work includes 
experiments in fluid flow and heat 
transfer, computer simulation, 
oral and written reports. 4 credit 
hours. 



177 



CM 311 Chemical Engineering 
Thermodynamics 

Prerequisite: CM 202. Applica- 
tions ot the first and second laws 
of thermodynamics to batch and 
flow processes important in 
chemical engineering for homo- 
geneous and heterogeneous sys- 
tems, mixtures and pure materi- 
als. Topics include phase and 
chemical equilibria, chemical 
reactions, thermochemistry, ther- 
modynamic properties and misci- 
bility. 3 credit hours. 

CM 321 Reaction Kinetics 
and Reactor Design 

Prerequisite: CM 202. Corequisite: 
M 204. Homogeneous and hetero- 
geneous catalyzed and noncat- 
alyzed reaction kinetics for flow 
and batch chemical reactors. Appli- 
cation of kinetic data to both 
isothermal and nonisothermal 
reactor design. This course is 
intended for both chemists and 
chemical engineers. 3 credit hours. 

CM 401 Mass Transfer 
Operations 

Prerequisites: M 204, CM 301. 
Advanced topics in diffusion and 
mass transfer in solids, liquids and 
gases. Topics include Pick's law, 
mass transfer coefficients, mass 
transfer correlation, interphase 
transfer, unsteady state mass trans- 
fer, adsorption, membrane separa- 
tions, humidification and drying. 
Application to the analysis and 
design of mass transfer controlled 
process equipment. 3 credit hours. 

CM 410 Transport Operations II 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CM 310. Application 
of transport phenomena principles 



to systems involving momentum, 
heat and mass transfer with empha- 
sis on equipment design. Topics 
include design ol staged separation 
equipment for distillation, extrac- 
tion and leaching, absorption, and 
others of current interest. Labora- 
tory work includes experiments in 
mass transfer, reactor systems, 
computer simulation, oral and 
written reports. 4 credit hours. 

CM 420 Process 
Design Principles 

Prerequisites: CM 310, IE 204. 
Corequisites: CM 321, CM 410. 
Study and application of principles 
needed in the design of process sys- 
tems. Topics include: cost estima- 
tion, hazard and safety analysis, eth- 
ical concerns, preliminary design 
techniques, optimization, comput- 
er-aided design (using ASPEN 
PLUS), alternative designs and tech- 
nical reports. Methods include team 
and individual assignments, oral and 
written presentations. 3 credit hours. 

CM 42 1 Plant and Process Design 

Prerequisites: CM 321, CM 410, 
CM 420 and senior status. A cap- 
stone course in the design of pro- 
cessing plants and equipment, 
applying principles from transport 
operations, thermodynamics, 

kinetics and economics. Students 
work individually and in groups to 
develop flowsheets, select equip- 
ment, specify operating conditions 
and analyze designs from technical, 
economic and safety perspectives. 
Extensive report writing and oral 
presentations. 3 credit hours. 



CM 43 1 Process Dynamics and 
Control with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: EE 201, M 204, CM 



310, CM 321. Fundamental princi- 
ples of chemical process dynamics 
used in the measurement and con- 
trol of process variables such as tem- 
perature, pressure and flow rate. 
Development of linear and nonlin- 
ear dynamic process models, stabili- 
ty analysis and control system design 
using analytical and computer meth- 
ods. Laboratory assignments stress 
the analysis, design and tuning of 
process loops using computer simu- 
lations and industrial control equip- 
ment on pilot-scale process equip- 
ment. Students gain experience 
using industrial control hardware 
such as programmable logic con- 
trollers and distributed control sys- 
tems. 4 credit hours. 

CM 450-455 Special Topics 
in Chemical Engineering 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
Intensive study of some aspects of 
chemical engineering not covered 
in the more general courses. 1-4 
credit hours. 

CM 501/502 Senior 
Project I and II 

Prerequisites: senior status and 
consent of course instructor (facul- 
ty adviser) and program director. 
Student should propose an origi- 
nal, significant problem or theory. 
The investigation should include at 
least two of the following elements: 
theoretical analysis, mathematical 
or computer modeling, optimal 
design methods or laboratory 
experimentation. Weekly confer- 
ences with adviser, final written 
and oral report with format to be 
determined by faculty adviser. 3 
credit hours per term. 



Courses 178 



CM 521 Air Pollution 
Fundamentals 

Prerequisite: permission of instruc- 
tor. An introduction to the sources 
of air pollution, the transport of 
gaseous and particulate pollutants 
in the atmosphere on local and 
global scales, transformations of 
pollutants by atmospheric process- 
es, the impact of pollutants on the 
environment, the control of 
sources of air pollution and legisla- 
tive mandates. Introduction to 
meteorological concepts and com- 
puter transport models. Current 
issues such as ozone depletion and 
global warming will also be dis- 
cussed. 3 credit hours. 

CM 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of faculty 
supervisor and program director. 
Opportunity for the student, under 
the direction of a faculty member, to 
explore an area of personal interest. 
Weekly conferences with supervisor, 
final written (and possibly oral) 
report, format to be determined by 
faculty supervisor. 1-4 credit hours. 



COMMUNICATION 

CO 100 Human Communication 

Competencies and skills needed to 
communicate effectively in varied 
personal, relational and profession- 
al contexts. Communication 
process, verbal/nonverbal commu- 
nication, listening, persuasion, 
conflict management and group 
decision making are studied in 
interpersonal, public, mass and 
organizational settings. Students 
are assisted in developing skills 
appropriate to real-life situations. 
Recommended for all students 
regardless of major. 3 credit hours. 



CO 101 Fundamentals of 
Mass Communication 

Corequisite: CO 100. Introduc- 
tion to the mass media of newspa- 
pers, film, magazines, radio, televi- 
sion, trade publications and public 
relations. Course emphasizes 
media's impact on society. 3 credit 
hours. 

CO 102 Writing for the Media 

A study of drills and exercises in 
writing television and radio news, 
news releases, speeches, public 
service announcements and film 
documentaries. Emphasis is placed 
on firsthand practical experience 
assignments and criticism of com- 
pleted copy. 3 credit hours. 

CO 103 Audio in Media 

Concerned with sound as used in 
radio, television and film. Course 
entails lectures, demonstration and 
lab practice of sound production 
and transmission. Laboratory fee; 3 
credit hours. 

CO 109 Commimication for 
Management and Business 

Prerequisite: CO 100. Introduction 
to the concepts and skills needed to 
communicate effectively in busi- 
ness and professional settings. Stu- 
dents develop communication com- 
petency by focusing on communi- 
cation activities common to busi- 
ness and service organizations. 
Interpersonal communication, 
group and meeting communica- 
tion, listening skills, interviewing, 
speeches, public and instructional 
presentations, and negotiation are 
stressed. 3 credit hours. 



CO 114 Production 
Fundamentals 

Introduction to theory and tech- 
nique in sound and video media. 
Several team projects will provide a 
fundamental production orienta- 
tion in each medium as well as pro- 
vide the environment to discuss 
goals and objectives of production. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CO 200 Theories of Group 
Communication 

Prerequisite: CO 100. Focus is on 
the dynamics of communication 
and group processes including 
leadership styles, team building, 
task and maintenance functions, 
problem-solving and decision- 
making, and conflict management. 
Students develop communication 
skills through class activities 
designed to maximize effective 
decision-making and evaluation. 3 
credit hours. 

CO 203 Radio Production 

Prerequisite: CO 103 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Theory and 
practice of techniques involved in 
the function and operation of a 
radio station. Microphone tech- 
niques, engineering operations, 
transmitter readings, logging and 
programming will be included. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CO 205 Intercultural 
Communication 

Prerequisite: CO 100. A theoretical 
and practical survey of intercultur- 
al communication processes. This 
course is concerned with the inter- 
personal dimensions of intercultur- 
al communication and will exam- 
ine the distinctive cultural orienta- 
tions, behaviors, expectations and 
values that affect communication 
situations. 3 credit hours. 



179 



CO 208 Introduction 
to Broadcasting 

Prerequisite: CO 101. General sur- 
vey and background of broadcast- 
ing, cable, pay and premium TV 
services and new technologies. 
Current changes, law, regulation, 
financing and public input are 
examined. Emphasis is placed on 
current status and future potential 
of these industries. 3 credit hours. 

CO 212 Television Production I 

Prerequisite: CO 114 or permission 
of instructor. Introduction to the 
mechanics, techniques and aesthetic 
elements of television production. 
Course provides the basic grounding 
in the art and craft of the medium. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CO 214 Elements of Film 

Prerequisite: CO 114 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Stresses the 
understanding of film as a creative 
form of communication. Student is 
introduced to basic techniques of 
motion picture production 
through lectures, audiovisual activ- 
ity and small group involvement. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CO 220 Film Production I 

Prerequisite: CO 214. Involves the 
transformation of an original idea 
into film: Initial analysis, proposed 
treatment plan, sequencing, film 
scripting, preproduction planning, 
nature of the production process. A 
short film is produced through 
team effort. Laboratory fee; 3 cred- 
it hours. 

CO 300 Persuasive 
Communication 

Prerequisite: CO 100. Study of 
communication as social influence. 



Analysis of theories of attitude 
change. The use and effects of 
compliance-gaining strategies in 
interpersonal, public and mass 
communication contexts. Students 
develop, present and analyze per- 
suasive messages. 3 credit hours. 

CO 301 Communication 
Theory and Research 

Prerequisite: junior status. Acquaints 
students with the nature of commu- 
nication inquiry. Theories of com- 
munication effects are surveyed. 
Research methodologies relevant to 
advertising, journalism, broadcast 
media, public relations and organi- 
zational communication settings are 
examined. 3 credit hours. 

CO 302 Social Impact of Media 

Prerequisite: CO 101. Examines 
such problems as regulatory control 
of the media, law and ethics, and the 
behavioral aspects of mass and inter- 
personal communication. Students 
examine the variety of media writing 
and commence writing their own 
media messages. 3 credit hours. 

CO 306 Public Relations Systems 
and Practices 

This course makes students aware 
of the depth and sensitivity of the 
role public relations plays in 
today's business environment. 
Orients students to career paths 
utilizing communication, jour- 
nalistic and management skills as 
well as skills acquired in business 
and English courses. Use of the 
lecture/discussion, case study and 
guest speaker approach to teach 
all students the historical, theoret- 
ical, practical and technical appli- 
cations of public relations. 3 cred- 
it hours. 



CO 308 Broadcast Journalism 

Prerequisite: CO 102. Entails prac- 
tice in news gathering, editing, writ- 
ing, and use of news services and 
sources. Creating documentary and 
special event programs through film 
for television news, on-the-spot film 
and video-tape reporting are includ- 
ed. 3 credit hours. 

CO 309 Public Relations Writing 

Prerequisite: CO 102. Examines the 
elements of good writing as applied 
to the public relations field. Students 
research and identify general and 
specialized audience needs and cre- 
ate messages to satisfy those needs. 
They plan and execute projects 
within selected media such as news- 
papers, magazines, TV, radio and 
film, as well as speeches for public 
appearances. 3 credit hours. 

CO 310 Pictorial Journalism 

The study of photography and 
media design as an active observa- 
tion and interpretation of events in 
the print media. 3 credit hours. 

CO 312 Television Production II 

Prerequisite: CO 212. An interme- 
diate course designed to provide the 
student with the opportunity to 
coordinate the many areas of TV 
production. Videotape and live pro- 
duction techniques are employed. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CO 317 Advanced Writing 
for the Media 

Prerequisite: CO 102. Planning 
and writing longer forms of scripts, 
emphasizing documentary and 
dramatic writing for production. 
3 credit hours. 



Courses 180 



CO 320 Film Production II 

Prerequisite: CO 220. The creative 
process involved in translating the 
screen play into a narrative film is 
explored. Narrative form, structure 
and production technique are exam- 
ined through examples of short and 
feature length films. Students pro- 
duce short narrative films by team 
effort. Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CO 335 Advertising Media 

This course covers the characteris- 
tics of major media and the impact 
of advertising on the demand for 
products and services. It will pro- 
vide students with a critical study 
of communication principles and 
concepts as applied to advertising 
copy. Emphasis will be on how 
consumers use media; media plan- 
ning and evaluation; copywriting 
styles; coordination of visual and 
verbal concepts; and the principle 
problems of building, implement- 
ing and evaluating advertising pro- 
grams. 3 credit hours. 



CO 340 The History of Film 

A survey of the historical develop- 
ment of the film medium consisting 
of lectures, discussions and the 
screening of films which demon- 
strate the interrelationships between 
the historical development and the 
establishment of the film medium as 
a powerful communicative art form. 
Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

CO 399 Media Campaigns 

Examines the role played by the 
mass media in political campaign- 
ing. Students look at historical 
perspectives and study current 
trends. FCC laws regarding adver- 
tising, lowest unit cost, section 
315 and other regulations will be 
examined. Students view video- 



tapes of past political media cam- 
paign examples and have the 
opportunity to participate in and 
produce hypothetical political 
media campaigns. 3 credit hours. 

CO 400 Communication 
in Organizations 

Communication examined in for- 
mal organizational contexts such as 
school, industry, hospitals and gov- 
ernment. Students will be prepared 
to function more effectively in 
organizations' dynamic communi- 
cation systems, and to solve prob- 
lems relative to the interaction of 
organizations with the environ- 
ment via the interactions of people 
and messages. 3 credit hours. 

CO 410 Management 
Communication Seminar 

Open to all upper division students, 
regardless of major. Involves struc- 
ture and fijnction of communication 
in organizations. Practice in under- 
standing and managing interperson- 
al differences. Emphasizes concepts 
and principles needed for effective 
management of organizational com- 
munication processes. 3 credit hours. 

CO 412 Advanced 
Television Production 

Prerequisite: CO 312. Essentials 
of budgeting, marketing and regu- 
latory policies and rules. Produc- 
tion teams are formed to produce 
sophisticated local television pro- 
grams under close supervision. 
3 credit hours. 

CO 415 Broadcast Management 

Involves the administrative and 
personnel problems of television 
and radio studio management, 
broadcast engineering, local sales, 
continuity and programming. 
Discus-sions will in-clude sched- 



uling and the development of 
facilities. 3 credit hours. 

CO 420 Communication 
and the Law 

Prerequisite: junior status. This 
course will trace the freedom and 
control of the print, broadcast, 
cable and telecommunications 
industries, and the effect on the 
public. 3 credit hours. 

CO 435 Advertising Seminar 
Prerequisites: CO 335 and senior 
standing. Strategic approaches to 
managing an advertising campaign 
related to a specific area, topic or 
product are developed. Emphasis 
on market research, determining 
consumer target markets, media 
selection, creation of copy, devel- 
opment and control of budgets, 
and evaluation and presentation of 
advertising. 3 credit hours. 



CO 440-454 Special Topics 

Special topics in communication 
which are of special or current 
interest. 3 credit hours. 

CO 500 Seminar in 
Communication Studies 

This capstone course will inte- 
grate the current and developing 
trends with the individual stu- 
dent's interest and perspectives. 
Students will present for discus- 
sion and examination issues of 
interest within a unifying theme. 
3 credit hours. 

CO 598 Internship 

On-the-job learning in selected 
organizations in production, public 
relations, journalism or advertis- 
ing. 3 credit hours. 



181 



CO 599 Independent Study 
in Communication 

Prerequisite: consent of faculty 
member and department chair. 
Opportunity for the student 
under the direction of a facuhy 
member to explore an area of 
interest. 1-3 credit hours per 
semester with a maximum of 6 
credit hours. 



COMPUTER 
SCIENCE 



CS 107 Introduction to 
Data Processing 

Concepts underlying modern 
application of computer systems. 
Windows, word processing, spread 
sheets, databases. Not to be taken 
for credit by computer science majors. 
3 credit hours. 



CS 110 Introduction to C 
Programming I 

Prerequisite or corequisite: M 115. 
A first course in computer pro- 
gramming using the C language; 
for engineering, computer science, 
mathematics and science students. 
Problem solving methods, algo- 
rithm development and good pro- 
gramming st)'le. Expressions, func- 
tions, libraries, basic types and 
arrays. Programming assignments 
will stress numeric applications. At 
the discretion of the instructor, 
class meetings will be used for 
group labs, drill or review sessions. 
Lecture plus lab (3 contact hours); 
2 credit hours. 

CS 111 Introduction to C 
Programming II (for non-CS 
majors) 



Prerequisite: CS 110. Further top- 
ics in C language programming^^ 
non-computer science majors. Prob- 
lem solving methods, algorithm 
development and good program- 
ming style. Strings, structured data, 
two dimensional arrays, files, 
parameter passing mechanisms. 
Programming assignments will 
stress numeric applications. Lec- 
ture plus lab (3 contact hours for 8 
weeks); 1 credit hour. 

CS 112 Introduction to C 
Programming II 

Prerequisite: CS 110. Further topics 
in C language programming for 
computer science majors. Problem 
solving methods, algorithm devel- 
opment and good programming 
style. Strings, structured data, two- 
dimensional arrays, files, recursion, 
dynamic memory allocation, 
parameter passing mechanisms and 
the use of pointers to process arrays. 
Basic algorithms for searching, sort- 
ing and simple numerical analysis. 
Programming assignments will 
include both numeric and nonnu- 
meric applications. Lecture plus lab 
(3 contact hours); 2 credit hours. 

CS 166 Fundamentals of 
Digital Computing 

Prerequisite: CS 11 0. A foundation 
course for computer science 
majors. Introduction to fundamen- 
tals, including logic, sequences, 
sets, functions, recursion, induc- 
tion, proof methods, counting 
techniques and Big-O notation. 3 
credit hours. 

CS 226 Data Structures and 
Algorithms I 

Prerequisite: CS 112. Preferred 
also: CS 166. Program design and 
debugging techniques. Dynamic 



memory allocation. Data structures 
and their applications: linked lists, 
stacks, queues, priority queues, 
trees. Recursion. Sorting and hash- 
ing algorithms. Substantial pro- 
grams will be written in C. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

CS 310 Computing Theory 

Prerequisites: CS 166, CS 226. 
Central topics in theory of compu- 
tation including: algebraic methods, 
proof procedures and formal sys- 
tems. Regular expressions, formal 
languages, grammars, the Chomsky 
hierarchy, finite automata, push- 
down the automata, decidability, 
the Church-Turing thesis, Turing 
machines and other formal comput- 
er models. 3 credit hours. 

CS 314 Computer Organization 

Prerequisite: CS 226. The structure 
and fianction of computers. The 
nature and characteristics of mod- 
ern computer systems and the 
operation of individual compo- 
nents — CPU, control unit, memo- 
ry units and I/O devices. Topics 
include addressing methods, 
machine language sequencing, 
microprogramming, complex I/O 
organization, interrupt systems, 
multi-module memory systems 
and caches, peripheral devices, 
microprocessors and pipelined 
computers. 3 credit hours. 

CS 320 Operating Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 314, or EE 371 as a 
prerequisite and EE 472 as a coreq- 
uisite. Modern operating system 
concepts including: interrupts, pro- 
cess and thread management, con- 
currency, deadlock, memory man- 
agement, file system management, 
resource allocation. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 1 82 



CS 326 Data Structures 
and Algorithms II 

Prerequisites: CS 166, CS 226. 
Data structures-trees, graphs, hash 
tables. Recursive techniques-divide 
and conquer, backtracking, recur- 
sion elimination. Algorithms-sort- 
ing, searching, shortest paths. 
Analysis of the complexity of algo- 
rithms. Programming will be 
required. 3 credit hours. 

CS 330 Systems Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 226, and either CS 
320 or EE 371. Techniques for 
UNIX systems programming in the 
C language. Topics include macro 
preprocessors, conditional compila- 
tion, low-level interface program- 
ming, UNIX system calls including 
file operations and directory opera- 
tions, process control, interprocess 
communication and client-server 
routines. Programming projects 
required. 3 credit hours. 
CS 338 Structure of 
Programming Languages 
Prerequisite: CS 310 and compe- 
tence in two computer languages. 
Computer language compo- 
nents — their specification, seman- 
tics, implementation and internal 
operation. The structure, syntax 
and semantic aspects of several lan- 
guages are examined. Short pro- 
grams are required in two new lan- 
guages. 3 credit hours. 

CS 416 Computer Ethics 

Prerequisite: junior or senior stand- 
ing. A critical examination of ethical 
theories and their application to the 
uses of computers and information 
technology. Issues include profes- 
sional ethics, privacy, responsibility, 
access, property rights, computer 
crime and social implications. (See 
also PL 416.) 1 credit hour. 



CS 417 Java Applet 
Programming 

Prerequisites: CS 226, CS 320. A 
study of object-oriented program- 
ming in an Internet environment 
using the Java Abstract Windows 
Toolkit. Also covers concurrency 
and synchronization with threads. 
3 credit hours. 

CS 420 Software Design and 
Development 

Prerequisite: senior standing in 
computer science. Application and 
extension of ideas and skills from 
preceding courses. Topics include: 
the human-machine interface; an 
introduction to object-oriented 
techniques; formal methods for 
capturing requirements, designing, 
improving and debugging code. A 
major group project will be 
designed and implemented. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

CS 425 Principles of 
Computer Graphics 

Prerequisites: M 118 and CS 226. 
Development and implementation 
of the fundamental algorithms of 
computer graphics: 2-D viewing, 
geometric transformations, clip- 
ping, curves, user interaction. 
Introduction to 3-D viewing and 
surfaces. Programming projects 
required. 3 credit hours. 

CS 434 Assembly Language 

Prerequisite: CS 314 or EE 371. 
Introduction to assembly language 
programming, including the hard- 
ware instruction set, assembly lan- 
guage syntax and features, macros, 
subprograms, interrupts, I/O con- 
versions. Programming required. 
3 credit hours. 



CS 437 Database Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 320 or CS 326. 
Overview of database systems. Pur- 
pose, structure, capabilities, use. 
Introduction to typical systems and 
their internal operation. Design 
and implementation of relational 
databases. 3 credit hours. 

CS 440 Programming Laboratory 

Prerequisite: junior or senior stand- 
ing in computer science, consent of 
faculty superviser and approval of 
program coordinator. The student 
will write a large program or a series 
of programs. Projects will be an 
extension of the course materials of 
one of the junior/senior courses. 
Course may be taken repeatedly, up 
to three times, working in different 
languages or doing more advanced 
projects. 1 credit hour. 

CS 445 Network Administration 

Prerequisite: CS 320. Fundamentals 
of administration of a networked 
computer. Topics include basic 
duties of a system administrator; 
overview of TCP/IP networking; 
file system layouts; user manage- 
ment; network services such as 
DNS, NIS, DHCP, file sharing, 
printing, mail, ftp, web, interfacing 
different operating systems on one 
network; and general security issues 
including prevention through fire- 
walls and secure shells. Lab exercis- 
es will use both UNIX and Win- 
dows systems. 3 credit hours. 

CS 447 Computer 
Communications 

Prerequisites: CS 314 or EE 472 
and any one of the following: ES 
345 or IE 346 or M 371 or EE 
320. Problems and solutions in 
network design. Layered models, 
network topology, protocols, virtu- 



183 



al circuits and packet switching, 
local networks (CSMA, token ring, 
ethernet), security (DES, public 
key crypto-systems), Internet pro- 
tocols, client/server programming, 
sockets. 3 credit hours. 

CS 450-469 Special Topics 
Prerequisite: junior or senior stand- 
ing in computer science. New devel- 
opments or current practices in 
computer science. 3 credit hours. 

CS 478 Artificial Intelligence 

Prerequisite: CS 226. The con- 
cepts, syntax and procedures of a 
functional language (LISP or a 
derivative of LISP such as Scheme). 
Methods and present capabilities of 
artificial intelligence. Topics: gen- 
eral search strategies, heuristics, 
game trees, knowledge representa- 
tion, propositional and first-order 
logic, inference, probabilistic rea- 
soning, planning and expert sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 
CS 504 Senior Project 
Prerequisite: senior standing in 
computer science, consent of facul- 
ty superviser and approval of pro- 
gram coordinator. A project is 
selected and carried out in conjunc- 
tion with the faculty adviser. Work 
is presented at a seminar at the end 
of the term. 3 credit hours. 

CS 526 Object-Oriented 
Principles and Practice/C++ 
Prerequisite: CS 330 or permission 
of instructor. The C++ language; 
object-oriented design and program- 
ming. Protection oi privacy, encap- 
sulation of data with relevant fiinc- 
tions. Advanced aspects of C++; 
inheritance, templates, polymor- 
phism, virtual functions and excep- 
tion handling. Several programming 
projects in C++. 3 credit hours. 



CS 528 Object-Oriented Design 

Prerequisite: CS 417 or CS 526. 
An object-oriented design method- 
ology course. Topics include 
requirements capture, object-ori- 
ented system analysis, design and 
implementation. Primary emphasis 
on the UML methodology, separa- 
tion of layers, design patterns and 
the importance of these in develop- 
ing a software project. Students 
will design a major group project 
and implement portions using C++ 
or Java. 3 credit hours. 

CS 551 Advanced Computer 
Graphics 

Prerequisite: CS 425. Three- 
dimensional graphics including 
surface modeling, transformations, 
three-dimensional viewing, spline 
curves and surfaces, color theory 
and shading, hidden-surface elimi- 
nation and an introduction to ray 
tracing. Progamming projects 
required. 3 credit hours. 

CS 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: junior or senior stand- 
ing in computer science, consent of 
faculty superviser and approval of 
program coordinator. (Refer to aca- 
demic regulations for independent 
study). Exploration of an area of 
interest. Written and oral presenta- 
tions are normally required. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 

DH 105 Introduction to 
Dental Hygiene I 

Provides entry-level dental hygiene 
students with an introduction to 
the profession of dental hygiene. 1 
credit hour. 



DH 110 Introduction to 
Dental Hygiene II 

Prerequisite: DH 105. This course 
is a continuation of DH 105 and 
provides students with a survey of 
contemporary issues encountered 
by health care workers. Emphasis is 
placed on professional standards, 
health promotion, disease preven- 
tion and ethical issues that are 
encountered by dental hygienists. 
1 credit hour. 

DH 214 Oral Facial Structures 

Prerequisites: DH 105, DH 110, 
and BI 121. This course examines 
the head and neck region, empha- 
sizing the anatomy of oral facial 
structures, including the teeth. 
This course also addresses oral his- 
tology and embryology. 4 credit 
hours. 

DH215 Radiology 

Prerequisites: DH 105, DH 110, 
DH 214, DH 220, and BI 121. 
This course is an extension of the 
clinical course sequence and con- 
centrates on the role of radiographs 
in the diagnosis and treatment of 
oral diseases. The course empha- 
sizes radiographic characteristics 
and production, equipment, safety, 
processing and interpretation. 
3 credit hours. 

DH 220 Dental Hygiene 
Concepts I 

Prerequisites: sophomore status and 
DH 105, DH 110. DH 220 is the 
first in a series of clinical courses; it 
provides the foundations of clinical 
dental hygiene practice. The course 
focuses on: professionalism, ethical 
decision-making principles, infec- 
tion control, the impact of tooth 
accumulated deposits and the devel- 
opment of the knowledge and skills 



Courses 1 84 



necessary for the delivery of dental 
hygiene services. Clinical laboratory 
fee; 3 credit hours. 

DH 240 Dental Hygiene 
Concepts II 

Prerequisites: sophomore status and 
DH 105, DH 110, DH 214, DH 
220. This course is an extension of 
DH 220 and focuses on the contin- 
uing development of the didactic, 
affective and psychomotor skills 
necessary for comprehensive dental 
hygiene treatment. Lecture topics 
include medical history, oral inspec- 
tion, data collection procedures, 
caries process, fluoride, oral physio- 
therapy and chemotherapeutics for 
the management of caries and peri- 
dontal disease, and treatment plan- 
ning. Classroom presentations con- 
centrate on the dental hygiene 
process of care. Clinical laboratory 
fee; 4 credit hours. 

DH 320 Pharmacology and 
Pain Management 

Prerequisites: junior status and 
required first- and second-year 
dental hygiene courses. This course 
provides an overview of medica- 
tions encountered by health care 
workers. Particular attention is 
paid to the impact various medica- 
tions have on dental and dental 
hygiene treatment. Medications, 
local anesthetics and other 
chemotherapeutic agents utilized 
in the dental treatment setting will 
be emphasized. 3 credit hours. 

DH 325 General and 
Oral Pathology 

Prerequisites: junior status and 
required first-and second-year den- 
tal hygiene courses. A survey of 
general pathology with emphasis 
on the impact of pathologic condi- 



tions on the oral cavity. Diseases of 
the gingiva and periodontium and 
the role of the dental hygienist in 
recognition and referral will be 
emphasized. 3 credit hours. 

DH 327 Periodontology 

Prerequisites: junior status and 
required first- and second-year den- 
tal hygiene courses. This course pro- 
vides an in-depth examination of 
periodontal diseases, the immune 
response, and both surgical and 
nonsurgical interventions. The role 
of the dental hygienist as a peri- 
odontal co-therapist is emphasized. 
3 credit hours. 

DH 330 Dental Hygiene 
Concepts III 

Prerequisites: junior status and 
required first- and second-year den- 
tal hygiene courses. Dental Hygiene 
330 is a continuation of the clinical 

course sequence. Content emphasis 
is placed on instrument alternatives, 
professional mechanical oral hygiene 
care, instrumentation theory for pre- 
vention and control of periodontal 
diseases, and the utilization of 
patient cases to assess periodontal 
status. Clinically, students will be 
treating patients with a broader 
scope of oral/physical conditions 
while incorporating patient radi- 
ographs into the dental hygiene 
treatment plan. Clinical laboratory 
fee; 3 or 5 credit hours. 

DH 342 Dental Materials 

Prerequisites: DH 330, junior sta- 
tus and required first- and second- 
year dental hygiene courses. This 
lecture/laboratory course provides 
students with an understanding of 
the biomaterials and techniques 
utilized in preventive, restorative 
and surgical dental procedures. 



Emphasis is placed on the role of 
the dental hygienist in maintaining 
and evaluating preventive and 
restorative materials. 3 credit hours. 

DH 350 Dental Hygiene 
Concepts IV 

Prerequisites: required first and 
second-year dental hygiene courses 
and DH 320, DH 325, DH 327, 
DH 330 and BI 115. DH 350 is 
the fourth course in the clinical 
course sequence. The didactic por- 
tion of the course concentrates on 
ethical decision-making skills, 
problem solving abilities, treating 
the medically compromised patient, 
and practice management princi- 
ples. Clinically students will have 
an opportunity to treat more chal- 
lenging cases. Clinical laboratory 
fee; 5 credit hours. 

DH 423 Instructional 
Planning and Media 

Prerequisites: junior status and 
required first- and second-year 
dental hygiene courses. This course 
provides dental hygiene students 
and practitioners with an overview 
of the instructional planning 
process. Emphasis will be placed 
on the steps in the process, the 
development and utilization of 
media, and oral presentation skills. 
3 credit hours. 

DH 438 Dental Hygiene Research 

Prerequisites: senior status and 
required first-, second- and third- 
year dental hygiene courses. This 
course provides dental hygiene stu- 
dents with the skills needed to 
understand, interpret and critique 
professional literature. Emphasis is 
placed on statistical tests and the 
design of a sound research proto- 
col. 3 credit hours. 



185 



DH 455 Dental Hygiene 
Public Health 

Prerequisites: required first- and 
second-year dental hygiene courses 
and DH 320, DH 325, DH 327, 
DH 330 and Bl 115. This course 
emphasizes the role of dental and 
dental hygiene public health pro- 
grams in the health care delivery 
system. The role of the dental 
hygienist in community disease 
prevention and health promotion 
activities will be stressed. Students 
will have the opportunity to inter- 
act with a broad spectrum of com- 
munity groups during the field 
experience aspect of the course. 

4 credit hours. 

DH 460 Advanced Dental 
Hygiene Concepts 

Prerequisites: required first and sec- 
ond-year dental hygiene courses and 
DH 320, DH 325, DH 327, DH 
330, DH 342, DH 350 and BI 11 5. 
The clinical course sequence culmi- 
nates in DH 460; this course pro- 
vides the opportunity for students 
to integrate skills and didactic 
knowledge previously gained. Clini- 
cal time will focus on increasing 
time efficiency, while maintaining 
recognized standards of care. Didac- 
tic content will focus on profession- 
al credentials, state licensing agen- 
cies, continuing education, the role 
of professional organizations, 
employment goals and resume 
preparation. Clinical laboratory fee; 

5 credit hours. 

DH 461 Oral Medicine 

Prerequisites: required first and sec- 
ond-year dental hygiene courses and 
DH 320, DH 325, DH 327, DH 
330 and BI 115. Oral Medicine 
utilizes the content from Anatomy 
and Physiology, Pharmacology, Oral 



Pathology, Dental Hygiene Con- 
cepts and other courses as the basis 
for discussing the impact of systemic 
conditions on the oral cavity. The 
medical history will be utilized in a 
case study approach to address the 
role of the dental hygienist in med- 
ical risk assessment and manage- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

DH 462 Dental Hygiene 
Internship 

Prerequisites: junior status and 
required first- and second-year den- 
tal hygiene courses. This course pro- 
vides senior-level dental hygiene 
students with the opportunity to 
apply the knowledge and skills 
gained throughout the dental 
hygiene curriculum in an internship 
experience that is compatible with 
fiiture career goals. 3 credit hours. 

DH 468 Dental Hygiene 
Senior Project 

Prerequisites: senior status and DH 
423, DH 438. This course provides 
the student with the opportunity to 
design a research protocol for a 
selected area of dental hygiene 
research. All previous and current 
coursework will assist the student to 
design and present a protocol that 
will be the basis for a hiture research 
study. 3 credit hours. 

DH 490-499 Special Topics 
Prerequisite: dental hygiene 
major; specifics of course(s) to be 
determined in consultation with 
the program director. Oppor- 
tunity for the student, under the 
direction of the dental hygiene 
faculty, to explore an area of inter- 
est. 1-3 credit hours; maximum of 
6 credits. 



DIETETICS 



DI 150 Sports Nutrition 

Review of the principles ol nutri- 
tion and exercise with emphasis on 
counseling the athlete; facts and 
fallacies of sports nutrition; energy 
and fluid balance; evaluating sports 
nutrition information in the lay lit- 
erature; appropriate diets for train- 
ing; and managing the young per- 
son, older adult and athlete with 
special needs. Planning meals for 
training and competition, as well as 
dietary evaluation using computer- 
ized nutrient analyses, will be 
included. 3 credit hours. 

DI 200 Introduction to Food 
Science and Preparation 

Provides basic knowledge of food 
science, food preparation and bak- 
ing principles; physiology of taste; 
components of food including 
color and flavor pigments (phyto- 
chemicals), application of scientific 
reactions during preparation and 
cooking; weighing and measuring 
skills; proper tasting and product 
evaluation techniques; as well as 
safe handling of knives and kitchen 
equipment. Instruction will include 
sanitary food experimentation and 
preparation in addition to class- 
room lectures. Laboratory fee; 3 
credit hours. 

DI 214 Menu Planning 
Principles of meal planning and 
writing menus for volume food 
combinations, texture, color, nutri- 
tion and cost. The interrelated 
steps involved in quantity food 
production, the delivery of food 
and the responsibilities of manage- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 186 



DI 216 Safety and Sanitation 

Basic principles of food sanitation 
and work safety are stressed. The stu- 
dent will write policies and proce- 
dures and conduct an in-service 
training class for a food service facil- 
ity in the hospitality field. Emphasis 
is placed on the causes and preven- 
tion of food poisoning and the 
moral and legal responsibilities of 
management to present safe and san- 
itary food to patrons. 3 credit hours. 

DI 326 Principles of Dietetics 
Management 

Provides knowledge required to 
effectively manage the provision of 
dietetic services in a food service 
operation, clinical nutrition 
department, community or ambu- 
latory nutrition program, private 
practice office, or other food/nutri- 
tion facility. Management princi- 
ples will be discussed using human 
resource applications, leadership 
theories, decision making tools and 
organizational skills for the success- 
ful dietetics manager. Managing 
materials, productivity, financial 
data and information in a dietetics 
environment will be discussed 
using qualit)^ improvement princi- 
ples. 3 credit hours. 

DI 330 Dietetic Practice 
in Today's Society 

Prerequisite: BI 215. Introduction 
to the health team. Emphasis on 
responsibilities of dietetic service 
professionals. Provides necessary 
tools for client assessment and 
interviewing. Discusses role of 
quality assurance in dietetic prac- 
tice. 3 credit hours. 



DI 340 Health Concerns 
and Menu Planning 

Acquaints the student with the 
techniques of menu planning 
required by today's health-con- 
scious trends. Menus are modified 
for various institutional settings 
with emphasis on calories, fat, cho- 
lesterol and sodium. 3 credit hours. 

DI 342 Food Preparation for the 
Health-Conscious 

Provides knowledge and expertise in 
creating and redesigning recipes. 
Incorporates today's healthy eating 
principles. Emphasis is placed on 
eating healthy without it costing 
more. Laboratory fee; 3 credit hours. 

DI 405 Community and 
Institutional Nutrition 

Emphasizes tools for developing 
effective dietetic programs in the 
community. Looks at the organiza- 
tion and development of action 
plans. Develops knowledge of the 
fundamentals of the political and 
legislative process. Discussion of 
nutritional problems that may be 
secondary to other health, social and 
economic influences. 3 credit hours. 

DI 450-455/499 Special Topics 

Selected topics in dietetics, health 
care, food service management, 
team concepts and a variety of cur- 
rent issues. 3 credit hours. 

DI 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: permission of the pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
research projects or other approved 
phases of independent study. 
3 credit hours. 



ENGLISH 



Note: E 105 and E 110 are required 
by all departments in the university 
and must be taken during the stu- 
dent's first year at the university. 
They are prerequisites for all upper- 
level, 200 or above, English courses. 

E 101 Academic Reading 

Reading, analyzing and interpret- 
ing nonfiction for the purpose of 
learning to comprehend textbooks. 
3 excess credit hours. 

E 103 Fundamentals 

Designed to increase awareness of 
the structure of English. Intensive 
practice in writing to improve the 
student's ability to construct 
effective sentences, paragraphs 
and short themes. 3 excess credit 
hours, 6 class hours per week. See 
section titled Developmental 
Studies Program elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

E 104 Fundamentals 
For international students. Same 
course description as E 103. 

E 105 Composition 

Prerequisite: satisfactory grade on 
English placement test or E 103. 
Analytical study of essays for the 
purpose of improving skills of 
written communication. Practice 
in writing in a variety of rhetori- 
cal modes with emphasis upon 
clarity and precision. 3 credit 
hours. 

E 106 Composition 

For international students. Same 
course description as E 105. 



187 



E 110 Composition and 
Literature 

Prerequisite: E 105 or placement 
by the English department. Read- 
ing, analyzing and interpreting lit- 
erature in three basic genres: fic- 
tion, poetry and drama. Writing of 
analytical and critical essays. The- 
atre fee for day sections. 3 credit 
hours. 

E 1 1 1 Composition and 
Literature 

For international students. Same 
course description as E 110. 

E 114 Oral Exposition 

A disciplined approach to oral 
communication for freshmen. 
Objectives are to develop profi- 
ciency in locating, organizing and 
presenting material and to help 
the student gain confidence and 
fiuency in speaking extemporane- 
ously. Students beyond the fresh- 
man year should take E 230. 3 
credit hours. 

E 20 1 Literary Heritage 

Prerequisite: E 11 0. Selected clas- 
sics of prose, poetry and drama 
from Homer through the Renais- 
sance. 3 credit hours. 

E 202 Modern Literature 

Prerequisite: E 1 1 0. Selected clas- 
sics of prose, poetry and drama 
from the seventeenth century to 
the present. 3 credit hours. 

E 21 1 Early British Writers 

Prerequisite: E 110. A study of 
important British writers from the 
beginning of literature in English 
through the Neoclassic era. 3 cred- 
it hours. 



E 212 Modern British Writers 

Prerequisite: E 110. A study of 
important British writers from 
the Romantic era to the present. 
3 credit hours. 

E 213 Early American Writers 

Prerequisite: E 110. A study of 
important American writers from 
Colonial times to the 1850s. 
3 credit hours. 

E 214 Modern American Writers 

Prerequisite: E 110. A study of 
important American writers from 
the 1860s to the present. 3 cred' 
hours. 



It 



E 2 1 7 African-American 
Literature I 

Prerequiste: E 110. A survey of 
African-American writers from the 
late 1700s to 1940. Texts selected 
from a variety of genres with 
emphasis on the African-American 
experience and heritage. 3 credit 
hours. 

E 2 1 8 African-American 
Literature II 

Prerequisite: E 217 or permission 
of instructor. A survey of African- 
American writers from the Harlem 
Renaissance to the present. Texts 
selected Irom a variety of genres 
with emphasis on the African- 
American experience and heritage. 
3 credit hours. 

E 220 Writing for Business 
and Industry 

Prerequisite: E 110. Intensive prac- 
tice in the various types of writing 
required of executives, business 
people, engineers and other profes- 
sionals, with emphasis on business 
letters, memos, resumes, internal 
and external reports, evaluations 



and recommendations, descrip- 
tions of procedures and processes. 
3 credit hours. 

E 225 Technical Writing and 
Presentation 

Prerequisite: E 110. Intensive prac- 
tice in the common forms of techni- 
cal writing, with emphasis on tech- 
nical description, processes, reports 
and manuals. Oral presentation of 
written work. 3 credit hours. 

E 230 Public Speaking and 
Group Discussion 

Prerequisite: E 110. Objectives are 
to develop proficiency in organiz- 
ing and presenting material, and to 
give practice in speaking, group 
interaction, conference manage- 
ment and small group discussion. 
3 credit hours. 

E 251 Narrative Nonfiction 
Prerequisite: E 110. Exploration of 
and practice in writing "the fourth 
genre," creative nonfiction. Empha- 
sis on the short piece, the literary 
memoir, and the personal essay. 
3 credit hours. 

E 260 The Short Story 

Prerequisite: E 1 10. A critical study 
of the best stories of American and 
British writers as well as stories, in 
translation, of writers of other 
nationalities. 3 credit hours. 

E 267 Creative Writing I 

Prerequisite: E 110. Exercises and 
instruction in writing short fiction 
and poetry. Composing, critiquing 
and editing skills developed in 
workshop format. 3 credit hours. 

E 268 Creative Writing II 

Prerequisite: E 267. Advanced exer- 



Courses 188 



cises and instruction in writing short 
fiction and poetry. Composing, cri- 
tiquing and editing skills refined in 
workshop format. 3 credit hours. 

E 270 The Advanced Essay 
Workshop 

Prerequisite: E 251 or E 267 or per- 
mission of instructor. Variable top- 
ics selected from travel, nature, sci- 
ence, social critique, humor. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

E 275 Popular Lyrics 
Prerequisite: E 1 1 0. Popular lyrics 
have always reflected the shifting 
values and concerns of American 
life-from the songs of the Jazz age, 
the Depression and World War II to 
rock'n'roll and the music video rev- 
olution of today. Through printed 
lyrics, recordings and videos, such 
topics as The American Dream, love 
and relationships, war and protest 
are traced in the songs of Irving 
Berlin and Cole Porter along with 
Ira and George Gershwin; from 
Broadway to Tin Pan Alley, to the 
Beatles, Bob Dylan and Paul Simon; 
from rhythm and blues, and coun- 
try western, to folk, rock and rap. 3 
credit hours. 

E 281 Science Fiction 
Prerequisite: E 1 10. A survey of the 
development of science fiction dur- 
ing the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Reading of American, 
English and European science fic- 
tion novels and short stories. 
3 credit hours. 

E 290 The Bible as Literature 

Prerequisite: E 1 10. A study of liter- 
ary genres in the Bible: narrative, 
drama, poetry, wisdom literature, 
books of prophecy, letters. Extensive 



readings in both the Old and New 
Testaments. 3 credit hours. 

E 300 Writing Proficiency 
Examination 

Prerequisite: E 110. Required of 
each student after earning 57 cred- 
it hours (including transfer cred- 
its). See Writing Proficiency Exam- 
ination statement or contact Eng- 
lish Department Chair. 

E 323 The Renaissance 
in England 

Prerequisite: E 110. Major writers 
of the English Renaissance, includ- 
ing Sidney, Spenser, Donne and 
Milton. 3 credit hours. 

E 341 Shakespeare 

Prerequisite: E 110. An analysis of 
representative tragedies, comedies 
and history plays. 3 credit hours. 

E 353 Literature of the 
Romantic Era 

Prerequisite: E 110. Poetry and 
prose of the major Roman- 
tics-Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Shelley, Keats, Lamb and 
Hazlitt-with attention given to the 
milieu of the writers, the Continen- 
tal background and theories of 
Romanticism. 3 credit hours. 

E 356 Victorian Literature 

Prerequisite: E 110. Poetry and 

prose from 1830-1900. The 

works of Tennyson, Browning, 

Arnold, Carlyle, Mill, Newman, 

Ruskin and others studied in the 

light of the social, political and 

religious problems of the period. 

3 credit hours. 

E 371 Literature of the 

Neoclassic Era 

Prerequisite: E 110. British writers 



of the period 1660-1789, with 
emphasis on Dryden, Pope, Swift 
and Johnson. 3 credit hours. 

E 390 The Novel in English 

Prerequisite: E 110. Great novels 
written in English (with the excep- 
tion of American novels, which are 
studied in American literature 
courses). 3 credit hours. 

E 392 Poe, Hawthorne 
and Melville 

Prerequisite: E 110. A study of 
the poetry and fiction of the 
major representatives of the tragic 
outlook on life in mid-nineteenth 
century American literature: Poe, 
Haw-thorne and Melville. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

E 394 American Humor 

Prerequisite: E 110. An intensive 
study of the history of American 
humor and its relevance to modern 
America. Various media will be 
studied and major humor writers 
including Mark Twain and Woody 
Allen will be studied. This distance 
learning course is taught on-line, 
using Internet resources to com- 
plement traditional materials. 
3 credit hours 

E 395 American Realism 
and Naturalism 

Prerequisite: E 110. Readings in 
the works of such major realists as 
Howells, Twain and James and 
important naturalist successors 
such as Frank Norris, Stephen 
Crane and Theodore Dreiser. 
3 credit hours. 

E 406-409 International 
Literature 

Prerequisite: E 110. Selected poetry. 



189 



drama and fiction, in translation, 
from one of the following nations: 
Russia, France, Germany or Spain. 
Topic to be announced for each 
semester. 3 credit hours each course. 

E 477 American Literature 
Between the World Wars 

Prerequisite: E 110. A study of the 
achievements of the main figures of 
the heroic generation that flour- 
ished between the two world wars 
and brought about "America's 
Coming of Age." Poets Ezra 
Pound, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, 
Wallace Stevens and William Car- 
los Williams; novelists Heming- 
way, Faulkner, Fitzgerald. 3 credit 
hours. 

E 478 Contemporary 
American Literature 

Prerequisite: E 1 10. Intensive study 
of recent American fiction, nonfic- 
tion, poetry and drama. 3 credit 
hours. 

E 480 Internship 

Prerequisite: E 1 10. A work experi- 
ence, arranged through the depart- 
ment, that will require the effective 
use of written or spoken English. 
3 credit hours. 

E 481-498 Studies in Literature 

Prerequisite: E 110. Special topics 
in literature, which may include a 
concentration on a single figure, a 
group of writers or a literary 
theme. 3 credit hours each course. 

E 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of the instruc- 
tor and the chair of the depart- 
ment; restricted to juniors and sen- 
iors who have at least a 3.0 quality 
point ratio. Opportunity for the 
student under the direction of a fac- 



ulty member to explore an area of 
interest. This course must be initiat- 
ed by the student. 1-3 credit hours 
per semester. 

ECONOMICS 



EC 100 Economic History 
of the U.S. 

Development of American econom- 
ic interactions in the various stages 
of agriculture, trade, industry, 
finance and labor. Change of eco- 
nomic practices and institutions, 
particularly in business, banking and 
labor as well as the changing role of 
government. 3 credit hours. 
EC 133 Principles of Economics I 
Foundations ol economic analysis, 
including economic progress, 
resources, technology, private enter- 
prise, profits and the price system. 
Macroeconomics including national 
income, employment and economic 
growth. Price levels, money and 
banking, the Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem, theory of income, employment 
and prices, business cycles and prob- 
lems of monetary, fiscal and stabi- 
lization policy. 3 credit hours. 

EC 134 Principles of 
Economics II 

Microeconomics including mar- 
kets and market structure and the 
allocation of resources. The distri- 
bution of income, the public econ- 
omy, the international economy 
and selected economic problems. 
3 credit hours. 

EC 200 Global Economy 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. 
This survey provides an under- 
standing of the linkages between 
the American economy and the rest 
of the world in a period of 



increased globalization. Particular 
emphasis will be placed on under- 
standing the various policies 
towards international trade and 
finance, and their relationship to 
business. 3 credit hours. 

EC 250 Economics and U.S. 
Industrial Competitiveness 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134. An 
examination of the free market and 
the most effective path to revitaliz- 
ing the competitiveness of U.S. 
industry in world markets. 
Addressed are such key issues as 
government assistance to indus- 
tries, regions and workers; regula- 
tion and antitrust; dealing with 
international competition; and 
promoting trade in services. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

EC 311 Government Regulation 
of Business 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. An appraisal of 
public policy toward transporta- 
tion, trusts, monopolies, public 
utilities and other forms of govern- 
ment regulation of economic activ- 
ity. 3 credit hours. 

EC 312 Contemporary 
Economic Problems 
Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. Selected current 
economic problems: inflation, un- 
employment, poverty in an affluent 
society, economic issues in health 
services, the economics of higher 
education and the problems of the 
cities and population. Examination 
and exploration of policies to cure 
these problems. 3 credit hours. 

EC 314 Public Finance 
and Budgeting 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 



Courses 190 



and junior standing. A general 
survey of government finance at 
the federal, state and local levels, 
including government expendi- 
tures, principles of taxation, pub- 
lic borrowing, debt management 
and fiscal policy for economic sta- 
bilization. 3 credit hours. 

EC 336 Money and Banking 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. Nature and flinc- 
tion of money, commercial banking 
system. Federal Reserve System and 
the Treasury, monetary theory, 
financial institutions, international 
financial relationships, history of 
money and monetary policy in the 
United States and current problems 
of monetary policy. 3 credit hours. 

EC 340 Microeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. Study of commod- 
ity and factor pricing, theory of 
production, cost theory, market 
structures under perfect and imper- 
fect market conditions. 3 credit 
hours. 

EC 341 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. An investigation 
of the makeup of the national 
income and an analysis of the fac- 
tors that enter into its determina- 
tion. The roles of consumption, 
investment, government finance 
and money influencing national 
income and output, employment, 
the price level and rate of growth 
and policies for economic stability 
and growth. 3 credit hours. 

EC 342 International Economics 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. The role, impor- 
tance and currents of international 



commerce; the balance of interna- 
tional payments; foreign exchange 
and international finance; interna- 
tional trade theory; problems of 
payments adjustment; trade restric- 
tions; economic development and 
foreign aid. 3 credit hours. 

EC 350 Economics of 
Labor Relations 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. History of the 
union movement in the United 
States, union structure and govern- 
ment, problems of collective bar- 
gaining, economics of the labor 
market, wage theories, unemploy- 
ment, governmental policy and 
control and problems of employ- 
ment security. 3 credit hours. 

EC 420 Applied 
Economic Analysis 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. A study of applied 
economics involves application of 
the tools of economic analysis to 
the real-life problems 

of business firms, government 
agencies and other organizations. 
3 credit hours. 

EC 440 Economic Development 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. Economic problems 
of developing countries and the poli- 
cies necessary to induce growth. 
Individual projects required. 3 credit 
hours. 

EC 442 Economic Thought 
Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. The development of 
economic doctrine from mercantil- 
ism and Adam Smith to Marx and to 
the thinking of modem-day theo- 
rists, such as Friedman, Galbraith, 
Schumpeter and Debreu. Emphasis 
upon the main currents of thought 



with the applicability to present-day 
problems. Individual study and 
reporting. 3 credit hours. 

EC 598 Internship 

Prerequisite: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. On-the-job learn- 
ing in selected organizations in 
areas related to the student's major. 
3 credit hours. 

EC 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: EC 133, EC 134 and 
junior standing. Independent 
research projects or other approved 
forms of independent study. 
3 credit hours. 



ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 



EE 155 Digital Systems I 

Fundamental concepts of digital 
systems. Binary numbers, Boolean 
algebra, combinational logic design 
using gates, map minimization 
techniques. Use of modular MSI 
components such as adders, multi- 
plexers, etc. Analysis and design of 
simple synchronous sequential cir- 
cuits, including flip-flops, shift reg- 
isters and counters. Introduction to 
VHDL. 3 credit hours. 

EE 201 Introduction to 
Electrical Circuits 

Prerequisite: M 117. Corequisites: 
M 118, PH 205. Energy effects 
and ideal circuit elements, inde- 
pendent and dependent sources; 
Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Laws; 
resistive networks; node and mesh 
analysis; Thevenin and Norton 
Theorems, maximum power trans- 
fer, analysis of first order networks; 
introduction of sinusoidal steady 
state, phasors, impedance, admit- 



191 



tance. DC and transient analysis 
using SPICE. 3 credit hours. 

EE 202 Network Analysis 

Prerequisites: EE 201, M 118. 
Continuation of EE 201. Analysis 
and design of networks in sinu- 
soidal steady state. Use of phasors 
and phasor diagrams, voltage and 
current gain, resonance, watts, 
VARS, power factor. Average and 
RMS values. Maximum power 
transfer. Mutual inductance, ideal 
transformers, Fourier series, use of 
SPICE in steady state analysis 
and design. 3 credit hours. 

EE 212 Principles of 
Electrical Engineering 

Prerequisite: EE 201. Digital logic 
systems. The binary number sys- 
tem, binary arithmetic, decimal to 
binary conversion, binary codes, 
hexadecimal codes. Boolean alge- 
bra, AND, OR, NAND, NOR 
and XOR gates. Combinational 
logic design. Multiplexer, rom, 
decoders, and read and write mem- 
ory. Digital systems. Sequential 
logic, latches and flip-flops, digital 
counters, registers, sequential logic 
design. This course includes several 
laboratory exercises related to top- 
ics covered in EE 201 as well as 
new topics in EE 212; the course is 
equally divided between lectures 
and laboratory. This course is 
intended for non-electrical engineer- 
ing majors. 3 credit hours. 

EE 247 Electronics I 

Prerequisite: EE 201. Signals and 
their frequency spectrum, ampli- 
fiers, circuit models for amplifiers, 
frequency response. Operational 
amplifiers, ideal op-amps, invert- 
ing and noninverting configura- 
tions, op-amp circuits. Basic semi- 



conductor concepts, drift currents, 
the p-n junctions, analysis of diode 
circuits, Zener diodes. BJT transis- 
tors, physical structure and modes 
of operation, biasing techniques, 
the BJT as an amplifier, biasing the 
BJT for discrete circuit design, 
analysis of the transistor as a 
switch. Field-effect transistors, 
structure and physical operation of 
MOSFETs, voltage-current charac- 
teristics of various FETs. FET cir- 
cuits at DC, the FET as an ampli- 
fier. 3 credit hours. 

EE 256 Digital Systems 
Laboratory 

Prerequisite: EE 155. Covers digital 
systems test instruments. Experi- 
ments in combinational and intro- 
ductory sequential circuits. Software 
tools; simulators. Schematic capture 
and introduction to hardware 
description languages. Design of sim- 
ple digital circuits. Written and oral 
laboratory reports. 2 credit hours. 

EE 257 Analog Circuits 
Laboratory 

Corequisite for electrical engineering 
majors: EE 202. Prerequisite for 
computer engineering majors: EE 
201. Laboratory exercises and proj- 
ects in dc and ac circuits including 
Ohm's law, Kirchhoff s laws. Mesh 
and Nodal Analysis, Thevenin's and 
Norton's theorems, capacitance and 
inductance measurements, transient 
behavior of RLC circuits, operational 
amplifiers and applications. PSPICE 
and Lab View are introduced; written 
and oral reports are required. Labora- 
tory fee; 2 credit hours. 

EE 302 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisites: EE 201 and M 204. 
Continuous-time and discrete-time 
signal and system properties; linear 



difference equations; the convolu- 
tion integral and convolution sum; 
the Laplace transform; the Z trans- 
form; the Fourier transform of con- 
tinuous-time signals. 3 credit hours. 

EE 306 Electronic Materials 
and Devices 

Prerequisite: EE 247. Semi-con- 
ductor materials including doping, 
conduction, diffusion, p-n junc- 
tion effects. Hall effect and quan- 
tum theory. Diode current-voltage 
relation, diode capacitance and 
breakdown; FET and BJT opera- 
tion. Magnetic properties of mat- 
ter. 3 credit hours. 

EE 320 Random Signal Analysis 

Prerequisite: EE 302. The elements 
of probability theory. Continuous 
and discrete random variables. 
Characteristic functions and cen- 
tral limit theorem. Stationary ran- 
dom processes, auto correlation, 
cross correlation. Power density 
spectrum of a stationary random 
process. Systems analysis with ran- 
dom signals. 3 credit hours. 

EE 341 Numerical Methods 
in Engineering 

Prerequisites: M 203 and a standard 
programming language. Topics 
include: solutions of algebraic and 
transcendental equations by iterative 
methods; system of linear equations 
(matrix inversion, etc.); interpola- 
tion, numerical differentiation and 
integration; solution of ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Scientific and 
engineering applications. 3 credit 
hours. (This course is cross listed 
with M 338 Numerical Analysis.) 

EE 344 Electrical Machines 

Prerequisite: EE 202. Magnetic 
fields and magnetic circuits, forces 



Courses 192 



and torques. Theory, characteristics, 
operation, testing, equivalent cir- 
cuits, design concepts and appHca- 
tions of direct current and alternat- 
ing current machines including 
transformers, synchronous and 
induction machinery. Design of 
main dimensions of transformer 
cores, rotors and stators and arma- 
ture windings. 3 credit hours. 

EE 348 Electronics II 

Prerequisite: EE 306. Review of 
FETs. Biasing the PET in discrete 
circuits, biasing configurations of 
single stage IC MOS amplifiers, 
PET analog switches. Differential 
and multistage amplifiers, the BJT 
differential pair, biasing in BJT inte- 
grated circuits, actively loaded dif- 
ferential pair, MOS differential 
amplifiers and multistage ampli- 
fiers. Frequency response of ampli- 
fiers, s domain analysis, poles and 
zeros, Bode plots, Miller effect, fre- 
quency response of differential 
amplifiers, study of various wide- 
band amplifiers. Output stages and 
power amplifiers. Class A, B and AB 
stages, IC power amplifiers. Analog 
integrated circuits, complete analy- 
sis of 741 op-amp circuit, CMOS 
op-amps, D/A and A/D converter 
circuits. 3 credit hours. 

EE 349 Electronics 
Design Laboratory 

Prerequisite: EE 348 (may be taken 
concurrently). Laboratory exercises 
and design projects intended to give 
students practical experience in ana- 
log electronics. Experiments include 
operational amplifiers, diodes, BJTs, 
PETs, single and multistage amplifi- 
er design as well as open ended 
design projects. PSPICE and Lab- 
View are used; written and oral 
reports are required. Laboratory fee; 
2 credit hours. 



EE 355 Control Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 302. The model- 
ing of linear and nonlinear physi- 
cal systems with discrete and con- 
tinuous state space equations. 
Solutions to the discrete and con- 
tinuous linear state equation; state 
transition matrices; phase variable 
forms. Eigenvalues and eigenvec- 
tors; Jordan canonical form. Con- 
trollability and observability of 
discrete and continuous systems. 
Relationships between controlla- 
bility, observability and transfer 
functions. The stability of discrete 
and continuous linear systems, 
Liapunov, root locus, Nyquist, 
feedback; PID control; lead-lag 
control. 3 credit hours. 

EE 356 Digital Systems II 

Prerequisites: EE 155 or equiva- 
lent. Course focuses on sequential 
logic design. Both synchronous 
and asynchronous techniques are 
covered with an emphasis on con- 
troller-based modular design. 
Design with a hardware descrip- 
tion language. Advanced topics 
will be covered as time permits. 
Course includes laboratory activi- 
ty. 3 credit hours. 

EE 371 Computer Engineering 

Prerequisites: CS 111, EE 155. 
Introduction to the architecture of 
digital computers. Stored program 
concept, instruction processing, 
memory organization, instruction 
formats, addressing modes, 
instruction sets, assembler and 
machine language programming. 
Input/output programming, direct 
memory access. Bus structures and 
control signals. Course includes 
laboratory activity. 3 credit hours. 



EE 398 Internship 

Prerequisite: 60 credit hours toward 
the B.S. degree. A partnership con- 
sisting of the student, faculty and 
employers/organizations providing 
exposure to and participation in a 
working engineering environment. 
The internship will translate class- 
room knowledge to a professional 
work environment, and the student 
will work and learn with practicing 
engineers while gaining professional 
experience. A minimum of 300 
hours performing related engineer- 
ing duties is required. No credit. 

EE 437 Industrial Power 
Systems Engineering 

Prerequisite: EE 202. Study of the 
components forming a power sys- 
tem, three-phase systems, transmis- 
sion line modeling and design, per 
unit quantities, modeling of power 
systems, one-line diagrams, sym- 
metrical components, sequence 
networks and unsymmetrical fault 
calculations, matrices and matrix 
algebra. 3 credit hours. 



EE 438 Electric Power 
Transmission 

Prerequisite: EE 437. Power system 
modeling for fault analysis using 
sequence networks, bus impedance 
matrix formulation, rake equivalent 
method, fault analysis by computer 
methods, transmission line ABCD 
parameters and distributed parame- 
ter analysis, design and performance 
using computers, load flow analysis, 
Gauss-Siedel method, Newton- 
Raphson method, economic load 
sharing, stability design and analysis 
using computers and FORTRAN 
programs. 3 credit hours. 



193 



EE 439 Electric Power 
Distribution 

Prerequisites: EE 344, EE 437. 
Structure of electric power distri- 
bution, distribution transformers, 
subtransmission lines, substations, 
bus schemes, primary and second- 
ary systems, radial and loop feeder 
designs, voltage drop and regula- 
tion, capacitors, power factor cor- 
rection and voltage regulation, pro- 
tection, buses, automatic reclosures 
and coordination. 3 credit hours. 

EE 445 Communications Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 320. The analysis 
and design of communications sys- 
tems. Signal analysis, transmission 
of signals, power density spectra, 
amplitude, frequency and pulse 
modulation; pulse code modula- 
tion; digital signal transmission. 
Performance of communications 
systems and signal to noise ratio. 
3 credit hours. 

EE 446 Digital Electronic Circuits 

Prerequisite: EE 348. Analysis and 
design of digital circuit classes 
(comparators and logical gates) by 
application of Ebers-Moll transis- 
tor model (saturation/active/cutoff 
regions). Comparators treated as 
overdriven differential/operational 
amplifiers, including bistable 
Schmitt trigger. Gates treated for 
major technologies: resistor-tran- 
sistor logic (RTL); transistor-tran- 
sistor logic (TTL); and emitter- 
coupled logic (ECL). Related inte- 
grated circuit analysis including 
internal variables and I-O charac- 
teristics. 3 credit hours. 

EE 450 Analog Filter Design 

Prerequisite: EE 202. Techniques 
in the analysis and design of analog 
filters. First order and second order. 



Design of Butterworth, Cheby- 
shev, Bessel-Thomson and Cauer 
lowpass. Lowpass to band-pass, 
bandstop and highpass filter trans- 
formations, design, and sensitivity 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 

EE 452 Digital Filter Design 

Prerequisite: EE 302. Techniques 
in the analysis and design of digital 
filters. Digital filters terminology 
and frequency response. FIR filter 
design. IIR digital filter design 
including Butterworth, Cauer, and 
Chebyshev lowpass, highpass, 
bandpass and bandstop filters. The 
DFT and IDFT. FFT algorithms. 
3 credit hours. 

EE 455 Control System Design 

Prerequisite: EE 355. State space 
representation of dynamical sys- 
tems via LaGrange's equations and 
rigid body dynamics. Solution of 
linear time varying differential 
equations in state-space form. 
Interpretation and properties of 
the state transition matrix. Trans- 
formation of state variables and 
the canonical forms. Robustness 
and stability via frequency- 
domain analysis. Control-lability 
and observability via the control- 
lability and observability grammi- 
an. Shaping the dynamic response 
via pole placement using full- and 
reduced-order linear observers and 
state feedback. Compensator de- 
sign by the separation principle. 
3 credit hours. 

EE 456 Hardware Description 
Language 

Prerequisite: EE 356. General 
structure of VHSIC Hardware 
Description Language (VHDL) 
code; entities and architecture in 
VHDL; signals, variables, data 



types; concurrent signal assign- 
ment statements; if, case and loop 
statements; components; package; 
functions and procedures; slices; 
attributes; generate statement; 
blocks; projects on design of com- 
binational and sequential circuits 
using VHDL. 3 credit hours. 

EE 457 Design Preparation 

Prerequisites: EE 349 and the 
appropriate prerequisites for the 
area. This course provides the stu- 
dent time and guidance in selecting 
a topic for the senior design course 
(EE 458) which follows this one. 
Suitable design projects may be sug- 
gested by the student, the faculty or 
via industrial contacts. Each student 
carries out a literature search in an 
area of interest, prepares a written 
proposal with a plan of action for 
the project, obtains approval by the 
faculty project adviser and makes an 
oral presentation of the project pro- 
posal. 2 credit hours. 

EE 458 Electrical Engineering 
Design Laboratory 

Prerequisite: EE 457. A laboratory 
course required of all B.S.E.E. candi- 
dates. The student selects a sub-area 
of electrical engineering and devotes 
the entire semester to laboratory 
design activities under the supervi- 
sion of a faculty member. This course 
provides the student with experience 
at a professional level with engineer- 
ing projects that involve analysis, 
design, construction of prototypes 
and evaluation ol results. 

At the present time design labo- 
ratory activity includes: 
Communications/Signal Process 
Laboratory. Prerequisites: EE 445 
or EE 450 or EE 452, EE 457. 

Control Systems Laboratory. Pre- 



Courses 194 



requisites: EE 355, EE 457. 

Digital Design Laboratory. Prereq- 
uisites: EE 356, EE 371, EE 457. 
Corequisite: EE 472 or EE 475. 

Fiber Optics/Microwave Labora- 
tory. Prerequisite: EE 462 or EE 

480, EE457. 

Machines/Power Systems Labora- 
tory. Prerequisites EE 344, EE 437, 
EE 457. 

Final report presentation and for- 
mal written final report required. 
3 credit hours. 

EE 461 Electromagnetic Theory 

Prerequisites: M 203, PH 205. 
Basic electromagnetic theory 
including static fields of electric 
charges and the magnetic fields 
of steady electric currents. Funda- 
mental field laws including 
Coulomb's Law, Gauss' Law, Biot- 
Savart's Law and Ampere's Law. 
Maxwell's equations, scalar and 
vector potentials, Laplace's equa- 
tion and boundary conditions. 
Magnetization, polarization. 
3 credit hours. 

EE 462 Electromagnetic Waves 

Prerequisite: EE 461. Electromag- 
netic wave propagation and reflec- 
tion in various structures, includ- 
ing coaxial, two-wire and wave- 
guide systems. Transmission lines. 
Various modes of propagation in 
rectangular waveguides. The dipole 
antenna. Linear antenna arrays. 
3 credit hours. 

EE 472 Computer Architecture 

Prerequisite: EE 356. Introduc- 
tion to theory of computing, 
processor design, control unit 
design, microprogramming, mem- 
ory organization, survey of parallel 
processors as time permits. 3 cred- 
it hours. 



EE 475 Microprocessor Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 371. Micro- 
processors and peripheral devices. 
Hardware and software aspects of 
interfacing. Microprocessor-based 
system design. Introduction to 
advanced topics such as data comu- 
nications, memory management 
and multiprocessing, as time per- 
mits. The course is structured 
around laboratory exercises. 
3 credit hours. 

EE 480 Fiber Optic 
Communications 

Prerequisite: EE 461. The funda- 
mentals of lightwave technology, 
optical fibers, LEDs and lasers, 
signal degradation in optical 
fibers. Photodetectors, power 
launching and coupling, connec- 
tors and splicing techniques. 
Transmission link analysis. This 
course will include selected labo- 
ratory experiments. 3 credit 
hours. 

EE 500 Special Topics in 
Electrical Engineering 

Prerequisite: instructor's consent. 
Special topics in the field of electri- 
cal engineering. 3 credit hours. 

EE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of faculty 
supervisor and approval of depart- 
ment chair. (Refer to academic regu- 
lations for independent study.) Inde- 
pendent study provides the opportu- 
nity to explore an area of special 
interest under faculty supervision. 
May be repeated. 3 credit hours. 



ENVIRONMENTAL 
SCIENCE 

EN 101 Introduction to 
Environmental Science 

Today's environmental problems 
have scientific, social and political 
aspects to them. This course, which 
is strongly suggested for majors and 
is suitable for nonmajors, will focus 
on the scientific aspects, but will not 
ignore the other two. The student 
will be introduced to the geology, 
biology, physics and chemistry 
behind the problems and to the 
social and political difficulties inher- 
ent in dealing with them. Through a 
combination of lectures, case histo- 
ries, in-class discussions and observa- 
tion of the environmental decision 
making process at work, it is hoped 
that the student will gain an under- 
standing of the complex nature of 
environmental problems and of the 
choices that must be made in solving 
them. May be taken concurrently 
with EN 102 Environmental Science 
Laboratory for laboratory science cred- 
it. Environmental Science majors 
and minors must take EN 102 con- 
currently. 3 credit hours. 

EN 102 Environmental 
Science Laboratory 

Corequisite: EN 1 1 . A laboratory 
to accompany EN 101 Introduc- 
tion to Environmental Science. 
Laboratory and field methods of 
identifying, characterizing and 
dealing with environmental con- 
cepts and problems such as water 
quality, waste disposal, ecosystem 
structure and change, population 
growth, pesticides and food pro- 
duction. Some field work required. 
Portions of some laboratory ses- 
sions will be devoted to discussion. 
1 credit hour. 



195 



EN 320 Introduction to 
Environmental Geology 

Prerequisite: EN 101 and intro- 
ductory chemistry or physics. An 
introduction to geology-related 
environmental problems and the 
applications of geology to environ- 
mental problem solving. Topics 
will include an introduction to 
basic physical geology, natural haz- 
ards-causes and remediation, ener- 
gy and mineral resources, waste 
disposal and the applications of 
geology to land use planning. 3 
credit hours. 

EN 500 Environmental 
Geoscience 

Prerequisite: M 1 1 5 or permission 
of instructor. Study of the systems 
of atmosphere, hydrosphere and 
lithosphere important in the under- 
standing of the causes of and solu- 
tions to environmental problems. 
Includes material from meteorology, 
climatology, oceanography, geology, 
geophysics, geomorphology and 
hydrology. Some weekend field 
trips, or acceptable alternative, 
required. 3 credit hours. 

EN 502 Environmental Effects 
of Pollutants 

Prerequisites: BI 320 EN 500. The 
demonstrated and suspected effects 
of air, water and other pollutants 
on natural systems and on human 
welfare. Methods of studying 
effects. Some weekend field trips, 
or acceptable alternative, required. 
3 credit hours. 

EN 521 Hydrology 
Prerequisite: Any one of the follow- 
ing: a college-level course in physics, 
geology, hydraulics, limnology or 
permission of instructor. Lectures 
cover basic hydrologic theory 



including nature and chemical 
behavior of water, precipitation and 
cvapotranspiration, interception, 
surface water, ground water, water 
supply and treatment, and water law. 
Other topics may include irrigation, 
flood control karst hydrology and 
water chemistry. Required labs cover 
field measurement, sampling and 
problem-solving techniques. Some 
weekend fieldwork required. Labo- 
ratory fee; 4 credit hours. 

EN 525 Geomorphology 
Prerequisite: EN 500/600 or a pre- 
vious college-level course in physical 
geology or geography, or permission 
of instructor. Study of landforms 
and the processes that produce them 
including the operation of erosional 
and depositional processes in a vari- 
ety of geologic settings (fluvial, 
coastal, glacial, periglacial, karst and 
arid). Also covers relationship of 
landforms and processes to the solu- 
tion of environmental problems. 
Lectures cover processes and labora- 
tories focus on landform recogni- 
tion and geomorphic process inter- 
pretation using maps and aerial 
photographs. Two required field 
trips (one 2-day and one 2 1 /2-day) 
with shared transportation and 
costs. 4 credit hours. 

EN 527 Soil Science 
Prerequisite: EN 500/600 or a pre- 
vious college level course in physi- 
cal geology/geography or permis- 
sion of instructor. Properties, 
occurrence and management of soil 
as a natural resource. Covers the 
chemistry, physics, morphology 
and mineralogy of soils and their 
genesis and classification. Soil 
properties will be related to their 
role in environmental problem 
solving and decision making. 



3 credit hours. 

EN 533 Special Topics in 
Field Geology 

Prerequisite: EN 500/600 or a pre- 
vious college level course in geolo- 
gy; other prerequisite(s) depend on 
specific course topic. Selected field 
studies and trips of special interest. 
Credit varies depending on the 
length of the trip or investigation. 
May be taken more than once. 
1-4 credit hours. 

EN 540 Introduction to 
Geographical Information 
Systems 

Survey of GIS technology, research 
and applications in natural 
resource management, environ- 
mental assessment, urban plan- 
ning, business, marketing and real 
estate, law enforcement, public 
administration and emergency pre- 
paredness. Includes critical evalua- 
tion, case studies and computer 
demonstrations. 3 credit hours. 

EN 541 Geographical 
Information System Techniques 
and Applications I 

Prerequisites: working knowledge of 
PC-based computing and consent 
of instructor/program coordinator. 
First of a two-course se-quence on 
GIS technology and applications. 
Laboratory exercises using both 
raster- and vector-based GIS sys- 
tems. Hardware and software com- 
ponents of GIS; data acquisition, 
input and manipulation; carto- 
graphic output; report generation. 
3 credit hours. 

EN 542 Geographical 
Information System Techniques 
and Applications II 

Prerequisite: EN 541 or consent of 



Courses 196 



instructor. Second of a two-course 
sequence on GIS technology and 
applications. Labpratory exercises 
using both raster- and vector-based 
GIS systems. Advanced GIS tech- 
niques; spatial analysis and model- 
ing for a variety of applications 
(e.g., environmental science, busi- 
ness, planning); development of 
GIS systems. 3 credit hours. 

EN 543 Application of GIS in 
Environmental Science 

Prerequisite: EN 642 or consent of 
instructor. Application of advanced 
GIS techniques to environmental 
assessment and management con- 
structed around a real-world project 
from a government agency or non- 
profit organization. Students will 
collaborate to design and imple- 
ment the complete GIS applica- 
tion. Definition of project goals, 
special project needs and steps nec- 
essary for successful completion. 3 
credit hours. 

EN 590 Special Topics in 
Environmental Science 

Prerequisites depend on the specif- 
ic course content. Essentially, the 
course is a study of selected field 
studies, projects and/or occasional 
trips of special interest. ?? credit 
hours 

EN 598 Internship 
Prerequisite: permission of adviser. 
An opportunity for field/work 
experience under the supervision of 
a faculty adviser. 3 credit hours. 

EN 599 Independent Study 
Prerequisites: environmental sci- 
ence major, consent of the depart- 
ment. Weekly conferences with 
adviser. Three hours of work per 



week required per credit hour. 
Opportunity for the student, 
under the direction of a faculty 
member, to explore an area of per- 
sonal interest. A written report of 
the work carried out is required. 1- 
6 credit hours, maximum of 6. 



ENGINEERING 
SCIENCE 

ES 103 Technology in 
Modern Society 

Scientific and technological develop- 
ments and their implications for the 
future of society. Prospects and 
problems in communications, ener- 
gy sources, automation, transporta- 
tion and other technologies. Use and 
control of technological resources 
for public benefit. 3 credit hours. 

ES 107 Introduction to 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: Ml 09 or equivalent. 
Overview of the problems, per- 
spectives and methods of the engi- 
neering profession. Modeling of 
real world problems for purposes of 
optimization, decision-making and 
design. Practical techniques of 
problem formulation and analysis. 
3 credit hours. 

ES 108 Engineering Workshop 

Prerequisite: M 115 (may be 
taken concurrently). An introduc- 
tion to the use of elementary sta- 
tistics and basic computer model- 
ing for engineering problem-solv- 
ing. Computer packages used may 
include spreadsheets, databases, 
math packages and drafting. 1 
credit hour. 



ES 345 Applied 
Engineering Statistics 

Prerequisites: M 118 and CS 107 
or equivalent. Topics include basic 
terminology, data presentation, 
descriptive statistics, curve-surface 
fitting and correlation, probability 
and model fitting, random vari- 
ables, statistical inferences, one- 
way analysis of variance, prediction 
and tolerance intervals, and control 
charts. 3 credit hours. 

ES 4 1 5 Professional 
Engineering Seminar 

Prerequisite: senior status. Discus- 
sion of topics on professional engi- 
neering and ethical matters pertain- 
ing to the practice of engineering. 
This course intended for non-civil 
engineering majors. Civil engineering 
majors take CE 407. 1 credit hour. 



FRESHMAN 
EXPERIENCE 



FE 00 1 Freshman 
Experience Seminar 

A ten-week course required during 
the first semester of study for all 
first-time, full-time freshman day 
students. The goal of this team- 
taught seminar class is to give stu- 
dents the tools to help them under- 
stand and succeed in a competitive 
environment by addressing such 
topics as the mission of UNH, aca- 
demic standards, diversity, time 
and stress management, college life 
vs. high school, university relation- 
ships, responsible human sexuality, 
exploration of self, alcohol and 
substance abuse, and career plan- 
ning and development. Seminar 
fee; 1 credit hour. 



197 



FINANCE 



FI 313 Business Finance 

Prerequisites: A 101, EC 133, QA 
217. An introduction to the princi- 
ples of financial management and 
the impact of the financial markets 
and institutions on that managerial 
function. An analytic emphasis will 
be placed on the tools and tech- 
niques of the investment, financing 
and dividend decision. In addition, 
the institutional aspects of financial 
markets, including a description of 
financial instruments, will be 
developed. 3 credit hours. 

FI 314 Principles of Real Estate 

Prerequisite: FI 313. An introduc- 
tion to the fundamentals of real 
estate practice and the essentials of 
the various aspects of the real estate 
business. Emphasis will be placed 
on brokerage, mortgage financing, 
investments, management and valu- 
ation relative to commercial and 
industrial real estate. 3 credit hours. 

FI 325 International Finance 

Prerequisite: FI 313. An introduc- 
tion to the theory and determina- 
tion of foreign exchange rates, 
mechanisms of adjustment to bal- 
ance of payments disturbance, 
fixed vs. flexible exchange rates. 
The international reserve supply 
mechanism and proposals for 
reform of the international mone- 
tary system. 3 credit hours. 

FI 327 Risk and Insurance 
Prerequisite: FI 313. An examina- 
tion and evaluation of risk in busi- 
ness affairs and the appropriate 
methods for handling them from 
the viewpoint of the business firm. 
Emphasis will be placed on, and 
extended consideration devoted to, 



the various forms of insurance cov- 
erage. 3 credit hours. 

FI 329 Corporate Financial 
Management 

Prerequisite: FI 313. A comprehen- 
sive analysis of the structure of opti- 
mal decisions relative to the func- 
tional areas of corporate financial 
decision making. Emphasis is placed 
on developing an understanding of 
the applications and limitations of 
decision models for the investment, 
financing and dividend decisions of 
the corporation. Topics include: firm 
valuation, capital budgeting, risk 
analysis, cost of capital, capital struc- 
ture and working capital manage- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

FI 330 Investment Analysis 
and Management 

Prerequisite: FI 313. An analysis of 
the determinants of valuation for 
common stocks, preferred stocks, 
bonds, convertible bonds and pre- 
ferred stock, stock warrants, and puts 
and calls. Emphasis will be placed on 
the analytic techniques of security 
analysis, portfolio analysis and port- 
folio selection. 3 credit hours. 



FI 341 Financial Decision 
Making 

Prerequisite: FI 330. An examina- 
tion of the conceptual foundations 
underlying portfolio theory, capital 
market theory and firm financial 
decision making. Emphasis will be 
placed on an integrated analysis of 
firm financial decision making 
under varying conditions of cer- 
tainty and capital market perfec- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

FI 345 Financial Institutions 
and Markets 

Prerequisite: FI 313 (may be taken 



concurrently). An examination of 
the relationship between the finan- 
cial system and the level, growth 
and stabilit)' of economic activity. 
Emphasis will be placed on the the- 
ory, structure and regulation of 
financial markets and institutions, 
coupled with the role of capital 
market yields as the mechanism 
that allocates savings to economic 
investment. 3 credit hours. 

FI 371 Structuring and 
Financing a New Business 
Prerequisite: FI 313. This course 
covers the financing requirements 
for a new business start-up. Students 
will learn the process of evaluating a 
venture and structuring the deal for 
raising money to finance the busi- 
ness. 3 credit hours. 

FI 450-454 Special Topics 
in Finance 

Prerequisite: FI 313. Junior-level 
standing required unless specified 
in course schedule description and 
instructor or finance coordinator 
approval. In-depth coverage of a 
selected topic in finance. 3 credit 
hours. 

FI 598 Internship 

Prerequisite: FI 313. On-the-job 
learning in selected organizations 
in the areas related to the student's 
major. 3 credit hours. 

FI 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: FI 313. The student 
undertakes independent research 
in finance under supervision of an 
instructor. The topic and meetings 
will be coordinated with the 
instructor. Research findings are 
presented in a formal paper. 3 cred- 
it hours. 



Courses 198 



FRENCH 



FR 101-102 Elementary 
French I and II 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and 
reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation and the fundamental 
principles of grammar. 3 credit 
hours each term. 

FR 201-202 Intermediate 
French 1 and II 

Prerequisites: FR 101-102 or equi- 
valent. Stresses the reading com- 
prehension of modern prose texts 
and a review of grammar necessary 
for this reading. Students are 
encouraged to do some reading in 
their own areas of interest. 3 credit 
hours each term. 



FIRE SCIENCE 

FS 102 Principles of Fire 
Science Technology 

Introduction to fire science. 
Review of the role, history and phi- 
losophy of fire protection in the 
United States. Particular emphasis 
placed on identifying fire hazards 
and finding appropriate methods 
of protecting life and property 
from fire. Includes career orienta- 
tion and discussion of current and 
future problems in fire protection. 
3 credit hours. 

FS 105 Municipal Fire 
Administration 

Delineates the fire safety problem, 
explores accepted administrative 
methods for getting work done, 
covers financial considerations, 
personnel management, fire insur- 



ance rates, water supply, buildings 
and equipment, distribution of 
forces, communications, legal con- 
siderations, fire prevention, fire 
investigation, emergency medical 
services, and records and reports. 
Designed for individuals involved 
in providing fire protection and 
EMS services in the public or pri- 
vate sector as well as those in safety 
or insurance. 3 credit hours. 

FS 106 Emergency Scene 
Operations 

The responsibilities and operating 
modes of officers commanding fire 
department units, including engine, 
ladder and rescue companies. A 
basic study of the Incident Com- 
mand System and its application. 
Initial evaluation of the problems 
confronting first responding units. 
Outline of particular problems 
encountered in various types of 
occupancies, buildings and situa- 
tions. Stress on safety of the operat- 
ing forces as well as of the public. 
Standpipe and sprinkler system uti- 
lization. Overhauling operations. 3 
credit hours. 

FS 201 Essentials of Fire 
Chemistry with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: CH 1 15/1 17 or permis- 
sion of instructor. The examination 
of the chemical requirements for 
combustion, the chemistry of fuels 
and explosive mixtures and the study 
of the various methods of stopping 
combustion. Analysis of the proper- 
ties of materials affecting fire behav- 
ior. Detailed examination of the basic 
properties of fire. 4 credit hours. 



the property and casualty insurance 
industry with an emphasis on 
property and liability coverages. 
The basic fire insurance policy is 
studied in depth. Methods of rat- 
ing buildings to promulgate a 
property insurance rate. Various 
methods of estimating the replace- 
ment cost and actual cash value of 
buildings are practiced. The con- 
cept of HPR (Highly Protected 
Risk) is studied. 3 credit hours. 

FS 204 Fire Investigation I 

Prerequisite: FS 102, FS 201. An 
analysis of fire investigations from 
the viewpoint of the field investiga- 
tor. An in-depth study of deter- 
mining the cause and origin of 
fires. Proper protection and collec- 
tion of evidence will be covered. 
3 credit hours. 

FS 207 Fundamentals of Fire 
Prevention 

Fundamentals of fire loss; stan- 
dards; fire laws; and the engineer- 
ing, chemistry and physics related 
to fire protection and prevention. 
Fire inspection practices and proce- 
dures as well as the fire and safety 
problems involved in various occu- 
pancies will be discussed in depth. 
3 credit hours. 

FS 208 Instructor Methodology 

A study of the methods and tech- 
niques of teaching fire safety and 
security to public safety and indus- 
trial employees. The use and devel- 
opment of visual aids. Actual teach- 
ing demonstrations and practice. 
3 credit hours. 



FS 203 Fire and Casualty FS 30 1 Building Construction 

Insurance Codes and Standards 

Provides a working knowledge of Prerequisite: FS 102. An in-depth 



199 



study of building construction with 
a particular emphasis on how each 
type of construction reacts to condi- 
tions present during a fire. Emer- 
gency responder safety will be a key 
issue. Potential signs of collapse will 
be studied in depth. The codes 
involved in building construction 
and fire/life safety. 3 credit hours. 

FS 302 Chemistry of 
Hazardous Materials 

Prerequisite: FS 201. An in-depth 
study of the chemical and physical 
properties of a wide variety of haz- 
ardous materials to enable the stu- 
dent to establish the safety measures 
in a hazardous chemical environ- 
ment. Basic properties of hazardous 
materials and appropriate handling 
methods. Explanation of chemical 
reactions, toxicity, oxidation, char- 
acteristics of explosives, plastics, 
resins and fibers. 3 credit hours. 

FS 303 Process and 
Transportation Hazards 

Prerequisite: FS 201. A strong 
overview of the types and properties 
of hazardous materials as well as 
their modes and methods of trans- 
portation, storage and use. Types 
and hazards of various containers. 
In-depth study of identification and 
control of emergencies involving 
hazardous materials. The various 
marking systems used to aid in iden- 
tification. 3 credit hours. 

FS 304 Fire Detection 
and Control 

Prerequisite: FS 102. An overview 
of fire detection and suppression 
equipment as well as the associated 
NFPA standards. Various types of 
fire detectors and detection/alarm 
systems. Basic electric circuits and 
the proper application, design and 
installation of these systems. Non- 



water-based fire suppression sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 

FS 305 Fire Detection and 
Control Laboratory 

Corequisite: FS 304. Electrical 
circuitry as applied to fire 
alarm/detection systems. Practical 
experience with various panels and 
detectors. Advantages and disad- 
vantages of open vs. closed circuits 
and methods of overcoming circuit 
disadvantages. 1 credit hour. 

FS 308 Industrial Fire Protection I 

Prerequisite FS 102. A study of fire 
hazards and potential fire causes in 
business and industry. Critical 
analysis of private protection meas- 
ures available to reduce loss poten- 
tial. Various methods of providing 
an acceptable level of protection 
for various industrial occupancies. 
3 credit hours. 

FS 309 Industrial Fire 
Protection II 

Prerequisite: FS 308. An explo- 
ration of management and organi- 
zational principles with emphasis 
on industrial fire equipment, fire 
brigades, loss control programs, 
and OSHA regulations dealing 
with industry. 3 credit hours. 

FS 3 1 1 Fire Protection Fluids 
and Systems 

Prerequisite: FS 102. Study of the 
fluids used in fire suppression sys- 
tems as well as the systems and 
hardware utilized to distribute the 
agent. Chemical and physical 
properties of fluids used in fire sup- 
pression systems. Fundamentals of 
automatic sprinkler systems. The 
design and testing of fire protec- 
tion water supplies. The codes 
involved in water-based fire sup- 
pression systems. 3 credit hours. 



FS 312 Fire Protection Fluids 
and Systems Laboratory 

Corequisite: FS 311. This course 
supplements FS 31 1 Fire Protection 
Fluids and Systems by providing a 
more in-depth study of the 
hydraulic principles used in design- 
ing water-based fire suppression 
systems. The process of designing 
and reviewing hydraulic-designed 
automatic sprinkler systems, 
including the use of computer pro- 
grams for these purposes. Hands- 
on testing of fire protection water 
supplies. 1 credit hour. 



FS 313 Fire Investigation II 

Prerequisite: FS 204. An advanced 
course geared towards personnel 
who have or may have statutory 
responsibility for fire investigation 
in the public sector and for private 
sector persons who conduct or 
may conduct investigations for 
insurance companies or litigation 
purposes. Proper techniques for 
investigation of fires and explo- 
sions will be studied in depth 
along with the appropriate stan- 
dards. 3 credit hours. 

FS 314 Fire Investigation II 
Laboratory 

Corequisite: FS 313. Experiments 
and practical experience in fire 
investigation with an emphasis on 
proper investigative techniques. 
1 credit hour. 

FS 325 Fire/Life Safety Codes 

Study of NFPA- 101 Life Safety 
Code in depth, along with the var- 
ious occupancies involved within 
structures. The basic concepts, 
interrelationships of these require- 
ments and the need for redundan- 
cy of safeguards provided. Applica- 
tion of this and other applicable 



Courses 200 



codes; building codes and other 
reference codes. 3 credit hours. 

FS 404 Special Hazards Control 

Prerequisite: FS 102. Types of 
industrial processes requiring spe- 
cial fire protection treatment such 
as heating equipment, flammable 
liquids, gases and dusts. Emphasis 
on fundamental theories involved, 
inspection methods, determination 
of relative hazard, application of 
codes and standards and economics 
of installed protection systems. 
3 credit hours. 

FS 405 Emergency Incident 
Management 

Prerequisite: FS 106. A study of the 
effective organization and manage- 
ment of emergency resources at 
various fire and large-scale emer- 
gency incidents. Includes a review 
of national standards and federal 
regulations impacting emergency 
incident management. Case studies 
of actual and theoretical incidents 
will be used to reinforce command 
and control concepts. 3 credit 
hours. 

FS 408 Fire Protection Law 

A study of law in relation to fire 
protection, liability of personnel, 
civil service, the search of the fire 
scene and criminal law related to 
arson and arson arrests. 3 credit 
hours. 

FS 409 Arson for Profit 

Prerequisite: FS 313/314. An 
overview of the financial tech- 
niques needed to investigate arson- 
for-profit fires with emphasis on 
sources of information, identifica- 
tion and analysis of financial docu- 
ments. 3 credit hours. 



FS 425 Fire Protection 
Plan Review 

Prerequisites: FS 301, FS 304/305, 
FS 311/312. The technical and 
hands-on practical experience 
necessary to complete a review of 
plans, specifications and shop 
drawings for fire/life safety sys- 
tems. Systems and topics include, 
but are not limited to: construc- 
tion; fire resistance rated assem- 
blies; means of egress; occupancy 
classification; emergency systems; 
fire detection, alarm and commu- 
nication systems; automatic and 
manual extinguishing systems; 
and HVAC systems. 3 credit 
hours. 

FS 450 Fire Protection 
Heat Transfer 

Prerequisite: ME 301. The essentials 
of fire spread and fire behavior: the 
combustion process, heat transfer, 
limits of flammability, flames and 
fire plumes, burning of fijels, flam- 
ing combustion, spread of flame, 
flash-over, and production and 
movement of smoke. 3 credit hours. 

FS 460 Fire Hazards Analysis 

Prerequisites: FS 301, FS 
304/305, FS 311/312. The appli- 
cation of systems analysis, proba- 
bility, engineering economy and 
risk management techniques to 
the fire problem. The basic princi- 
ples of fire growth and spread in a 
building. Time lines will be estab- 
lished from the time of ignition to 
that of extinguishment. Various 
methods of modifying the time 
line. 3 credit hours. 

FS 497 Research Project 

Designed to allow fire science 
majors to research a topic of spe- 
cial interest to the individual stu- 



dent. Development of a student 
project and a written report in a 
specific area of fire science with 
faculty supervision. Grade award- 
ed upon completion of the proj- 
ect. 3 credit hours. 

FS 498 Research Project I 

Designed to allow fire science majors 
to research a topic of special interest 
to the individual student. Develop- 
ment of a student project and a writ- 
ten report in a specific area of fire 
science with faculty supervision. 
Grade awarded upon completion of 
the project. 1 credit hour. 

FS 499 Research Project II 

Designed to allow fire science majors 
to research a topic of special interest 
to the individual student. Develop- 
ment of a student project and a writ- 
ten report in a specific area of fire 
science with faculty supervision. 
Grade awarded upon completion of 
the project. 2 credit hours. 

FS 500 Special Topics 

Selected topics in fire science on a 
variety of current problems and 
specialized areas not available in 
the regular curriculum. 3 credit 
hours. 

FS 501 Internship 

Prerequisite: consent of the direc- 
tor of the fire science program. 
The purpose of the fire science 
internship is to provide the 
^student with real-life work expe- 
rience. The student will be placed 
with an agency, the sponsor, who 
agrees to provide a meaningful 
work experience for the intern. 
The intern is required to spend 
a minimum of 128 hours with the 
sponsor and prepare a paper 
outlining the experience. 3 credit 
hours. 



201 



FS 502 Emergency Medical 
Technician 

This course is designed to prepare 
the basic emergency medical tech- 
nician in accordance with the 
U.S. Dept. of Transportation cur- 
riculum and Connecticut EMS 
guidelines. The course covers an 
introductory survey of emergency 
medical services including 
medical, legal/ethical aspects, role 
of the EMT, CPR at the American 
Heart Association Basic Rescuer 
Level, patient assessment, care 
of wounds and fractures, airway 
maintenance, medical and envi- 
ronmental emergencies, patient 
transportation, emergency child- 
birth and basic extrication. Stu- 
dents can expect to spend some 
time involved in practical experi- 
ences. Laboratory fee; 6 credit 
hours. 

FS 510 Senior Seminar 

This course will integrate the current 
and developing knowledge of the 
behavior of fire with the problems 
presented by today's building con- 
struction, building materials and 
building codes. This course will use 
the seminar format with full student 
participation. 3 credit hours. 

FS 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of the direc- 
tor of the fire science program. The 
independent study is designed to 
allow the fire science major to com- 
plete a fire science course that is 
not being offered or the student is 
otherwise unable to complete in 
the traditional manner. This self 
study opportunity will be allowed 
only with permission of the direc- 
tor of fire science aft:er determining 
that the student has sufficient 
background in the subject to com 



plete the material in a satisfactory 
manner. 3 credit hours. 



GERMAN 

GR 101-102 Elementary 
German I and II 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and 
reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation and the fundamental 

principles of grammar. 3 credit 
hours each term. 

GR 201-202 Intermediate 
German I and II 

Prerequisites: GR 101-102 or the 
equivalent. Stresses the reading 
comprehension of modern prose 
texts and a review of grammar nec- 
essary for this reading. Students are 
encouraged to read in their own 
areas of interest. 3 credit hours 
each term. 

HUMAN SERVICES 



HMS 250 Scientific Methods in 
Human Services 

Prerequisites: CJ/HMS 100, M 
109 or M 127. Introduction to the 
use of scientific methods and logic 
in the human service professions. 
Topics studied will include science 
and the scientific approach to 
problem solving, the logic of causal 
inference, problem and hypothesis 
formulation, the use of experimen- 
tal designs, laboratory methods, 
survey research methods and meas- 
urement issues in human services. 
3 credit hours. 

HMS 251 Quantitative 
Applications in Human Services 
Prerequisite: CJ/HMS 250. Intro- 



duction to the use of quantitative 
analysis through study of the basic 
statistical tools and databases used 
in human services. Emphasis will 
be on applied applications of quan- 
titative methods in service delivery 
systems. 3 credit hours. 

HMS 350 Leadership and 
Management in Human Services 

Prerequisite: junior or senior stand 

ing. An in-depth view of leadership 
and management skills in a variety 
of criminal justice and human serv- 
ice settings. Special focus will 
include problem solving and quality 
control in agencies. 3 credit hours. 

HMS 408 Child and Family 
Intervention Strategies 
Prerequisites: P 111, P 336, CJ 
205, CJ 209, CJ 301. This course 
is designed to introduce students to 
the application of investigation and 
critical thinking strategies to the 
problems of child abuse, neglect 
and domestic violence. Assessment, 
decision-making and case manage- 
ment strategies will be explored. 
3 credit hours. 

HMS 409 Adult Intervention 
Strategies 

Prerequisite: HMS 409. A compre- 
hensive investigation of mental 
health and correctional systems, 
including residential and communi- 
ty-based treatment. Particular atten- 
tion will be placed on strategies for 
dealing with resistant clients. Stu- 
dents will develop critical thinking 
skills relating to best practices in a 
variety of settings. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 202 



HMS 540 Computer 
Applications in Research and 
Program Evaluation 

Prerequisites: CJ/HMS 250, 
CJ/HMS 251, M 109 or Ml 27. 
An advanced course reviewing 
major statistical packages and 
models employed in the analysis of 
criminal justice and human servic- 
es data. Students will learn analytic 
techniques using real data sets. Pro- 
gram evaluation needs will be stud- 
ied and tested. 3 credit hours. 

HMS 541 Problem Solving: 
Planning, Analysis and 
Evaluation 

Prerequisite: senior standing. An 
advanced seminar utilizing the 
skills developed in preceding 
research methods and program 
evaluation courses. The focus will 
be on integrating and developing 
an effective, yet flexible problem 
solving schema for criminal justice 
and human service agencies. Quan- 
titative and qualitative solutions 
will be stressed to fit the appropri- 
ate problem. Field problems will be 
solicited. 3 credit hours. 



HOTEL AND 
RESTAURANT 

MANAGEMENT 



HR 165 Introduction to 
Hospitality and Tourism 

This survey course gives overall 
direction to the hospitality and 
tourism professions, how they inte- 
grate with one another, and the 
various key aspects that are unique 
to the profession of tourism — the 
basis of the industry, with hotels 
and food service being its two main 
components. 3 credit hours. 



HR 200 Classical Techniques in 
the Culinary Arts 

The student will understand the 
principles of professional cooking 
techniques and the interaction of 
the different ingredients used in 
cooking. The course will be theo- 
retical and will not include tasting 
of food or hands-on assignments. 
The student will follow a series of 
cooking demonstrations done by 
professional chefs, illustrating the 
techniques of classical professional 
cooking. 3 credit hours. 

HR 202 Hospitality Purchasing 

Introduction to the purchasing, 
receiving and issuing of foods and 
food items. The identification of 
guides, preparation of specifica- 
tions and cost control procedures 
are stressed. 

HR 210 Applied Techniques in 
the Culinary Arts 

Prerequisite: HR 200. This course 
is designed to teach the basic classi- 
cal cooking techniques, including 
the basic principles of baking, uti- 
lizing a hands-on format. The stu- 
dent will apply the theories and 
principles acquired in the prerequi- 
site course in the context of a pro- 
fessional kitchen environment. 
The class will emphasize concepts 
of efficiency, organization, cleanli- 
ness and time management. 3 
credit hours. 



HR 226 Front Office Procedures 

Students will acquire an understand- 
ing of the principles regarding pro- 
cedures and intradepartmental inter- 
actions — which include sales and 
marketing, housekeeping, mainte- 
nance(engineering), accounting, and 
the food and beverage seg- 



ments-while maintaining high stan- 
dards of guest service. Examination 
of how various hospitality computer 
hardware and software applications 
assist with the above responsibilities. 
3 credit hours. 



HR 227 Guest Services 
Management 

Introduction to various manage- 
ment aspects of guest services, lodg- 
ing and assisted-care operations as 
applied to the hospitality industry. 
Staffmg, budget preparation, mate- 
rials planning^ directing and con- 
trolling ongoing operations are sig- 
nificant sections of this course. 
3 credit hours. 

HR 228 Human Resource 
Management for the Hospitality 
and Tourism Industry 

Prerequisite: HR 165. Provides the 
knowledge required to formulate 
and manage effectively the human 
resources in a hospitality and 
tourism related operation. Man- 
power analysis, organizational 
needs, job designs, recruitment 
process and other human resource 
topics are studied. 3 credit hours. 

HR 235 Dining Room 
Management 

This course will provide the knowl- 
edge necessary to fully understand 
dining room management as essen- 
tial to the success of commercial 
food operations. Students will 
practice various service techniques 
that include American, French and 
Russian service standards as well as 
having the opportunity to demon- 
strate dining room organization, 
hospitality human resource and 
marketing techniques, and dining 



203 



thematic decoration skills. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

HR 250 Lodging Operations 

Analysis and evaluation of^ lodging 
operations, including assisted-care 
facilities, to include rooms, divi- 
sions, food and beverage, sales and 
marketing, engineering/mainte- 
nance, human resources, account- 
ing and other major functional 
areas. 3 credit hours. 

HR 260 Club, Resort and 
Casino/Gaming Operations 
Management 

Typical organizational structures, 
management techniques and the 
special aspects of operations for 
private clubs, resorts, casino/gam- 
ing. 3 credit hours. 

HR 280 Legal Aspects of 
Hospitality, Tourism and Private 
Clubs 

An overview of specific issues and 
liabilities that the professional 
manager will face is presented. 
Classic and current case studies and 
issues will be presented to the stu- 
dent, including laws that affect per- 
sonal and financial advancement. 
3 credit hours. 



HR 304 Volume Food 
Production and Service 

Prerequisite: HR 200. This course 
is designed to teach the basic prin- 
ciples of volume food production 
and service, which is so critical to 
the commercial food industry. Stu- 
dents will be preparing meals that 
are consumed and analyzed by the 
public, applying the theories and 
principles acquired in the prerequi- 
site course in the context of a pro- 



fessional kitchen environment. 
The class will emphasize concepts 
of efficiency, organization, cleanli- 
ness and time management. 3 
credit hours. 



HR 305 Wine Appreciation 

Considers the major wines and 
wine regions of the world, with 
emphasis on American, French and 
German wines. Wine tasting is an 
integral part of the course. Stu- 
dents must be 21 years of age. 3 
credit hours. 

HR 315 Beverage Management 

The beverage area is perceived as a 
profit center for hotels and restau- 
rants. Themes, decor and ambience 
that enhance the hospitality experi- 
ence are explored. All management 
functions are examined; planning, 
staffing, accounting, marketing 
and menu development are 
emphasized. Other pertinent topics 
are discussed, including liability 
and licensing issues. 3 credit hours. 

HR321 Hospitality Accounting 

Financial and managerial account- 
ing principles and practices for the 
hospitality industry are examined. 
The Uniformed System of 
Accounts of the American Hotel 
and Motel Association will be fol- 
lowed. Included in this course will 
be hospitality financial statement 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 

HR 322 Marketing for Tourism, 
Hospitality and Private Clubs 

Development of general marketing 
skills as managers face more com- 
petitive forces, and how managers 
need to better understand the mar- 
keting opportunities facing them 



and how best to compete in that 
evolving environment. The ability 
to communicate with internal and 
outside constituencies is reviewed 
in detail, giving consideration to 
newsletters, web-based or 
enhanced communications, and 
other media for interacting with 
employees, and the external com- 
munity. 3 credit hours. 

HR 330 Hospitality Property 
Management 

Property and facilities management 
is crucial to the success of lodging 
and assisted-care facilities. Analysis 
of various components consisting 
of hospitality energy usage and 
environmental impacts on the hos- 
pitality industry will be presented. 
Included in the analysis will be 
how a hospitality manager creates 
and implements systematic control 
procedures for lodging properties. 
3 credit hours. 



HR 375 Hospitality 
Entrepreneurship 

Examination of the various aspects 
of marketing for the hospitality 
entrepreneur. Different segments 
of the hospitalit)' industry will be 
analyzed. 3 credit hours. 

HR 400 Leadership Theory for 
Hospitality and Tourism 
Professionals 

The demand by industry manage- 
ment for critical decision making 
skills within the hospitality and 
tourism professions is essential. 
Oral and written presentation 
comparing and contrasting man- 
agement and leadership ideas based 
on classical models are used to eval- 
uate the student's specific leader- 
ship style and how that style can be 



Courses 204 



successful in the hospitality and 
tourism profession. 3 credit hours. 

HR 4 1 1 Hospitality Layout 
and Design 

Prerequisite: HR 330. Prospectus 
and feasibility planning for hospi- 
tality and assisted-care facilities is 
emphasized. Overall property and 
building design for hospitality enti- 
ties, including equipment, receiv- 
ing and storage space, accessibility 
design and other factors are includ- 
ed in the course. The course will 
include a team-designed, scaled 
drawing project presentation. 3 
credit hours. 

HR 450 Advanced Cuisine 
Management and Technique 

This is the capstone course in food 
production and service. Students 
are provided an opportunity to 
practice advanced culinary tech- 
niques within various international 
and domestic cuisine themes. Stu- 
dents are divided into management 
teams and develop a meal manual 
that includes team mission state- 
ments, pre- and post-meal cost 
analysis, personnel deployment, 
interaction with the dining room 
management teams, standardized 
recipe creations and performance 
appraisal criteria. Student-man- 
agers prepare a dining experience 
that is offered to paying clientele. 
3 credit hours. 

HR 491-499 Special Topics in 
Hospitality 

Special studies of a variety of cur- 
rent topics and specialized areas in 
the field not available as part of the 
regular curriculum. 3 credit hours 



HR 501 Leadership Applications 
for Hospitality and Tourism 
Professionals 

Prerequisite: HR 400. Building on 
the theories presented in the prereq- 
uisite course, this course provides the 
opportunity to apply the knowledge 
of leadership models to hospitality 
and tourism current issues. Research 
and oral presentations based on 
team projects is the major focus of 
this course. 3 credit hours. 

HR 510 Hospitality Internship 

Prerequisite: completion of 600 
hours of practicum and consent of 
instructor. Interns are required to 
complete 400 hours of internship 
experience in conjunction with the 
designated internship coordinator. 
The internship experience will 
emphasize supervisory responsibili- 
ties whenever possible. This experi- 
ence will be formulated by the facul- 
ty, the designated coordinator, the 
student and an industry profession- 
al, a cooperative effort that helps to 
ensure the students success. The 
internship will be augmented by 
written and oral reports, industry 
performance evaluations and faculty 
oversight. This is a designated course 
for the Culinary Arts Certificate pro- 
gram. 3 credit hours. 

HR 516 Advanced Financial 
Management and Policy Analysis 
for Hospitality and Tourism 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and 
consent of department chair. This 
course takes the experienced hospi- 
tality student through the certifica- 
tion process for designation as a 
Certified Hospitality Account 
Executive (CHAE) and includes 
the certification exam as a portion 
of the course and final grading 



process. Additionally, Hospitality 
Financial & Technology Profes- 
sionals (HFTP) membership is 
included. Topics include invest- 
ment trends and analysis, lease and 
purchase considerations, working 
capital finance, audit and financial 
management, and the CHAE exam 
preparation. Students are responsi- 
ble for the cost and fees required 
for the CHAE examination and 
HFTP membership. 3 credit hours. 

HR 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
department coordinator. Indepen- 
dent research projects or other 
approved phases of independent 
study. 3 credit hours. 



HISTORY 



HS 101 Foundations of the 
Western World 

Traces the course of western civi- 
lization from its earliest beginnings 
in the ancient Middle East down to 
the eighteenth century. Includes 
major cultural trends, interactions 
between society and economy, and 
analysis of the rise and fall of 
empires. 3 credit hours. 

HS 102 The Western World in 
Modern Times 

Europe and its global impact from 
the eighteenth century to the pres- 
ent. Includes revolutionary move- 
ments, the evolution of mass democ- 
racy and the world wars of the twen- 
tieth century. 3 credit hours. 

HS 108 History of Science 

The development of science and 
technology from antiquity to the 



205 



present. Their impact on society 
and the world. 3 credit hours. 

HS 110 American History 
Since 1607 

A one-semester survey course, cov- 
ering such major topics as colonial 
legacies, the American Revolution, 
nation-state building, sectional 
tensions, urbanization, industrial- 
ization, the rise of world power sta- 
tus, social and cultural develop- 
ments and post- World War II. Not 
open to those who have had HS 
211 or 212. 3 credit hours. 

HS 120 History of Blacks in the 
United States 

The history and background of 
black people in the United States. 
Social, political and cultural devel- 
opment. 3 credit hours. 

HS 207 World History 
Since 1945 

Survey of major events and trends 
since World War II. Advanced 
industrial societies are emphasized. 
Includes decolonization, East- West 
conflicts, and patterns of economic 
cooperation and competition. 
3 credit hours. 

HS 211 United States to 1865 

Survey of American social econom- 
ic, political and diplomatic devel- 
opments from colonial times to 
1865. Not open to those who have 
had HS 1 10. 3 credit hours. 

HS 212 United States Since 1865 
Survey of American history from 
1865 to the present. Institutional 
and industrial expansion, periods 
of reform and adjustment. The 
U.S. as a world power. Not open to 
those who have had HS 110. 
3 credit hours. 



HS 260 Modern Asia 

The ideological, cultural and tradi- 
tional political, economic and 
diplomatic history of east, south 
and southeast Asia from the six- 
teenth century to the present. 
3 credit hours. 

HS 262 Modern Chinese History 

A study of China from 1800, 
including the impact of the West 
and Japan; its transformation from 
monarchy to civil war to the Peo- 
ple's Republic of China up to the 
present; the Republic of China on 
Taiwan; the incorporation of Hong 
Kong in the PRC. 3 credit hours. 

HS 264 Modern Japanese History 

An analysis of the diverse political, 
economic, social, military and cul- 
tural factors which influenced the 
emergence of Japan as a modern 
nation in the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies; its post- World War II growth 
into an economic giant and its cur- 
rent evolution. 3 credit hours. 

HS 270 Europe from Renaissance 
Through Enlightenment 

Europe from 1300 to 1800; from 
feudal states to nation states; devel- 
opment of cultural, political, social 
and economic life; religious unity 
and religious diversity. 3 credit hours. 

HS 306 Modern Technology 
and Western Culture 

The development of the modern 
technological world and its rela- 
tionship to social, economic and 
cultural changes from the Industri- 
al Revolution to the present. 
3 credit hours. 

HS 312 United States in 
the Twentieth Century 

The interaction of political, eco- 



nomic, social and intellectual 
events and their impact on twentieth 
century America. 3 credit hours. 

HS 345 Europe in the 
Nineteenth Century 

European history from the 
Napoleonic period to World War I; 
its internal development and world 
impact. 3 credit hours. 

HS 351 Russia and the 
Soviet Union 

The development of czarist Russia 
from 1200 to the Revolution of 
1917; the former USSR from 1917 
to the present. 3 credit hours. 

HS 353 Modern Britain 

The development of British history 
from the Restoration of 1660 to 
the present. Includes Britain's role 
in international affairs. Special 
emphasis on social and economic 
topics. 3 credit hours. 

HS 355 Modern Germany 

German civilization from the sev- 
enteenth century to the present; its 
impact on Europe and the world. 
3 credit hours. 

HS 381-389 Selected Studies 
in History 

Special topics in history dealing 
with the modern world. An in- 
depth study of vital historical 
issues. 3 credit hours. 

HS 446 Europe in the 
Twentieth Century 

Recent and contemporary Euro- 
pean history beginning with World 
War I. Institutional development 
and its changing role in politics. 
3 credit hours. 



Courses 206 



HS 491 Senior Seminar 

The undertaking oi an independ- 
ent study and research project. 

Required of all history majors in 
their senior year. 3 credit hours. 

HS 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of faculty 
member and department chair. 
Opportunity for the student, under 
the direction of a faculty member, to 
explore an area of interest. This 
course must be initiated by the stu- 
dent. 1-3 credit hours per semester 
with a maximum of 6. 



HUMANITIES 

HU 300 The Nature of Science 

Prerequisites: E 110, HS 102, a 
laboratory science course, and a 
social science course. Investigates 
science as a human activity, as a 
social institution, and as an instru- 
ment for acquiring and using 
knowledge. The nature of scientific 
knowledge, the organization of sci- 
entific activity and the interaction 
of science with technology and cul- 
ture. A course about science and 

the process of generating new 
knowledge. 3 credit hours 

INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS 

IB 413 International Marketing 

Prerequisites: EC 200, MK 300. 
Applied marketing decision mak- 
ing in international firms. The 
development of marketing strategy 
and techniques in foreign markets. 
Study of key multinational market- 
ing skills, especially research, prod- 



uct policy, pricing, promotion and 
distribution. 3 credit hours. 



IB 421 Operation of the 
Multinational Corporation 

Prerequisites: EC 200, FI 313, MG 
310. Specific problems encoun- 
tered by multinational firms. Top- 
ics include investment decisions, 
environmental scanning, planning 
and control and the social responsi- 
bilities of firms in host nations. 
3 credit hours. 

IB 422 International Business 
Negotiations 

Prerequisites: EC 200, MG 310. 
An analysis of the various stages 
involved in the international business 
negotiating process beginning with 
planning and ending with post-con- 
tract adjustments. A survey and eval- 
uation of the various primary and 
secondary sources negotiators can go 
to for information needed in the 
negotiating process. 3 credit hours. 

IB 450 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: EC 200. Junior-level 
standing required unless specified 
in course schedule description. 
Selected topics of special or current 
interest in the study of internation- 
al business. 3 credit hours. 

IB 549 Global Business Strategy 

Prerequisite: IB 413. Identification 
and relation of the elements 
involved in the dynamics of a com- 
pany and its international environ- 
ment through case analysis. This is 
a capstone course in international 
business. 3 credit hours. 

IB 598 Internship 

Prerequisite: EC 200. Supervised 
field experience for qualified stu- 
dents in areas related to their 



major. 3 credit hours. 

IB 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: EC 200. A planned 
program of individual study under 
the supervision of a member of the 
faculty. 3 credit hours. 

INDUSTRIAL 
ENGINEERING 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 

Prerequisite: M 117 and CS 107 
or equivalent. A quantitative 
analysis of applied economics in 
engineering design; the economy 
study for comparing alternatives; 
interest formulae; quantitative 
methods of comparing alterna- 
tives; intangible considerations; 
selection and replacement econo- 
my for machines and structures; 
break-even and minimum cost 
points; depreciation; effect of 
income taxes on the economy 
study; review of current industrial 
practices. Promotes logical deci- 
sions through the consideration of 
alternative courses of action. 
3 credit hours. 

IE 243 Work Design 

Prerequisite: sophomore status. 
Introductory course in the design 
and evaluation of efficient work 
methods and working environ- 
ments. Techniques useful in prob- 
lem definition, design of alterna- 
tive work methods, and evaluation 
of alternative designs including 
process charting, operation analy- 
sis and principles of motion econ- 
omy. Emphasis placed on human 
factors and safety implications of 
alternative work method designs. 
Equitable time standards are 
developed for work method 
designs through the use of time 



207 



study procedures including stop- 
watch time study, computerized 
predetermined-time systems and 
work sampling. 3 credit hours. 

IE 302 Ergonomics 

Prerequisite: junior standing. 
Covers basic terminology and 
application of ergonomic princi- 
ples to the workplace. Topics 
include repetitive motion injuries, 
cumulative trauma disorders, 
carpal tunnel syndrome, anthro- 
pometry, human error analysis, 
channel capacity, reaction time, 
human-machine interaction, and 
current ergonomics news and 
applications. 3 credit hours. 

IE 303 Cost Control 

Prerequisites: junior status and M 
118. Basic analysis of cost control 
techniques. Designed to give mem- 
bers of the management team the 
underlying rudiments of cost esti- 
mating and control systems. Theo- 
ry of standard costs, flexible budg- 
eting and overhead handling tech- 
niques emphasized by analytical 
problem solution. Life-cycle cost- 
ing. Value engineering. 3 credit 
hours. 

IE 304 Production Control 

Prerequisites: IE 243, M 118. The 
basic principles that govern the 
design of production control sys- 
tems in an industrial plant. The 
principles used in solving problems 
of procuring and controlling mate- 
rials, in planning, routing, schedul- 
ing and dispatching are considered. 
Familiarizes the student with exist- 
ing and new methods used in this 
field including MRP, JIT, comput- 
er-aided process planning and 
group technology. 3 credit hours. 



IE 31 1 Quality Assurance 

Prerequisite: junior status. Quality 
considerations in product design 
and manufacturing; product 
inspection and process control; 
total quality management princi- 
ples as applied to process design, 
control and improvement; prod- 
uct safety and liability issues. 
3 credit hours. 

IE 344 Human Factors 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: IE 347. Covers psy- 
chological and physiological 
aspects of people at work, includ- 
ing: work physiology, information 
processing, motor skills and move- 
ment control, signal detection the- 
ory and anthropometry with the 
aim of improvements in workplace 
design. 3 credit hours. 

IE 346 Probability Analysis 

Prerequisite: M 203. Develops the 
theory of probability and related 
applications. Covers combinations 
and permutations, probability 
space, law of large numbers, ran- 
dom variables, conditional proba- 
bility. Bayes' Theorem, Markov 
chains and stochastic processes. 
3 credit hours. 

IE 347 Statistical Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 346 and CS 107 or 
equivalent. Provides an introduc- 
tion to the application of statistical 
techniques to engineering prob- 
lems. Measures of central tendency 
and dispersion, estimation, hypoth- 
esis testing, correlation and regres- 
sion, elementary analysis of vari- 
ance. 3 credit hours. 

IE 348 Manufacturing Processes 

Corequisite: IE 304. Provides a 



basic understanding of metal cut- 
ting as applied to conventional 
manufacturing. Properties of mate- 
rial; machining fundamentals; tool 
geometry; surface finish; forces; 
material removal processes; casting 
processes; measurement and 
inspection; process capability and 
quality control; ferrous and nonfer- 
rous metals; chip/type machining 
processes; machining economics in 
turning, milling and drilling. 3 
credit hours. 

IE 402 Operations Research 

Prerequisite: IE 346 and CS 107 or 
equivalent. The operations research 
area is oriented to various mathe- 
matical methods for solving certain 
kinds of industrial problems. Topics 
included are: linear programming, 
including simplex method; trans- 
portation and assignment problems; 
queuing; dynamic programming; 
simulation. 3 credit hours. 

IE 403 Operations Research II 
Prerequisite: IE 402 or equivalent. 
Advanced coverage of Bayesian sta- 
tistics, utility and game theory, 
logistics and distribution, theory of 
scheduling, graph theory, and sto- 
chastic processes, with applications 
in manufacturing and service 
industries. 3 credit hours. 

IE 407 Reliability and 
Maintainability 

Prerequisite: IE 346 or equivalent. 
Reliability measures: hazard mod- 
els and product life, reliability 
function; static reliability models; 
inference theory and reliability 
computation; dynamic reliability 
models, reliability design examples. 
3 credit hours. 



Courses 208 

IE 408 Systems Analysis chronic sources of trouble; coordi- ten and oral presentation of the 

Prerequisites: senior status and IE nating specifications, manufactur- proposed facility design. CAD 

347. Presents the analytical and ing and inspection; measuring techniques are used extensively in 

conceptual techniques upon which process capability; using inspection the development of the final facili- 

systems analysis and development data to regulate manufacturing ty layout. 3 credit hours. 

is based, as applications to business processes; statistical methods, con- 

and industrial fields. Development trol charts, selection of modern IE 448 Advanced Manufacturing 

of case studies and their applica- sampling plans. 3 credit hours. Engineering Operations 

tion, oriented to improved designs. Prerequisites: ME 200 and IE 348. 

3 credit hours. IE 437 Metrology and Inspection A course for understanding 

in Manufacturing machining economics and the 
IE 414 Engineering Management Prerequisite: IE 436. The study of basic principles of the theory of 
Prerequisite: senior status. Provides metrology and inspection practices metal cutting and metal working to 
insight into the elements of the in manufacturing. Emphasis on the improve manufacturing engineer- 
managerial process and develops a design and development of differ- ing operations. Course emphasizes 
rational approach to the problems ent types of gauging for inspection design and operation of better tool- 
of managing productive processes in manufacturing. 3 credit hours. ing for different types of manufac- 
and the engineering function. turing operations. Experimental 
Focusing largely on complex prob- IE 440 Synchronous investigation of metal cutting and 
lems of top and middle-level man- Manufacturing metal working methodologies 
agement, students will investigate Prerequisite: IE 204 and IE 304. stressed. 3 credit hours, 
the modern tools managers use Group technology in design and 

under given circumstances, stress- manufacturing; manufacturing envi- IE 450 Special Topics in 

ing the ongoing activities of man- ronment, resources, products, con- Industrial Engineering 

agement as part of an integrated, straints and decisions; synchronized Prerequisite: consent of instructor, 

continuous process. 3 credit hours. manufacturing operations and Selected topics of current interest 

process improvement. 3 credit hours. in the field of industrial engineer- 
IE 435 Simulation and ing. 3 credit hours. 
Applications IE 443 Facilities Planning 

Prerequisites: IE 346 and CS 107 Prerequisites: senior IE status and IE 460 Computer-Aided 

or equivalent. Corequisite: IE 402. IE 243, IE 304. Factors in plant Manufacturing 

Techniques for modeling of a sys- location, design and layout of Prerequisites: IE 348 and CS 107 or 

tem (business or scientific/engi- equipment. Techniques for obtain- equivalent. Topics covered include: 

neering) using computer simula- ing information essential to the Computer-Aided Manufacturing 

tion. Simulation principles will be development and evaluation of (CAM), Numerical Control (NC), 

emphasized. Student exercises and alternative facility layout designs industrial robot applications, Flexi- 

design projects will be run using are presented with an emphasis on ble Manufacturing Systems (FMS), 

a modern simulation package. environmental and safety consider- Group Technology (GT), integra- 

3 credit hours. ations. Design of departmental tion of CAD/ CAM, Computer 

areas, resource allocation and flow, Aided Process Planning (CAPP) and 

materials handling, storage and the applications software for manufac- 

lE 436 Quality Control economic implications of alterna- turing. 3 credit hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 347. Economics of tive designs are discussed. Students 

quality control; modern methods work in small groups on the design IE 465 Robotics in 

used by industry to achieve quality of a manufacturing facility to pro- Manufacturing 

of product; preventing defects; duce an actual consumer product. Prerequisite: IE 460. Topics cov- 

organizing for quality; locating Project culminates in both a writ- ered include: applications of robot- 



209 



ics in manufacturing, robot classifi- J 202 Advanced News 

cation, introduction to a high-level Writing and Reporting 

robot language, task planning, and Prerequisite: J 201. Intensive prac- 

laboratory projects with industrial tice in news writing and reporting. 

robots. 3 credit hours. 3 credit hours. 



a faculty member, to explore an area 
of interest. 3 credit hours. 



BUSINESS LAW 



IE 498 Internship 

Prerequisites: consent of faculty 
supervisor and approval of depart- 
ment chair. Supervised project- 
work related to industrial engineer- 
ing with local industries. 3 credit 
hours. 

IE 504 Senior Project 

Prerequisites: senior status and per- 
mission of department. The student, 
in conjunction with a faculty advis- 
er, selects and works on a project. 
Work is presented at a seminar at the 
end of the semester. 3 credit hours. 

IE 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: junior status. A 
planned program of individual study 
under the supervision of a member 
of the faculty. 3 credit hours. 

JOURNALISM 

J 101 Journalism I 

A survey of journalism designed to 
acquaint students with the profes- 
sion. The American newspaper as a 
social institution and a medium of 
communication. 3 credit hours. 

J 201 News Writing 
and Reporting 

Prerequisite: CO 102 or permis- 
sion ol instructor. The elements of 
news, the style and the structure of 
news stories, news-gathering meth- 
ods, copyreading and editing, 
reporting. 3 credit hours. 



J 311 Copy Desk 

Prerequiusite: J 201. Intensive 
practice in copyreading, editing 
and revising, headline writing, 
photograph selection, page make- 
up and reporting. Regular critiques 
of the copy-desk work of major 
newspapers. 3 credit hours. 

J 351 Journalistic Performance 

Prerequiusite: J 201. Students fol- 
low the coverage in the media 
given to selected topics, and pre- 
pare to make judgments of the cov- 
erage by doing research and 
becoming knowledgeable about 
the particular topic chosen. The 
course stresses analytic reading and 
responsible, informed criticism. 
3 credit hours. 

J 367 Interpretive and 
Editorial Writing 

Prerequiusite: J 201. Practice in the 
writing of considered and knowl- 
edgeable commentaries on current 
affairs and in writing of interpre- 
tive articles based on investigation, 
research and interviews. 3 credit 
hours. 

J 450-454 Special Topics 
in Journalism 

Selected topics in journalism which 
are of current or special interest. 
3 credit hours. 

J 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor 
and department chair. Opportunity 
for a student, under the direction of 



LA 101 Business Law and the 
Regulatory Environment 

An overview of the legal system as 
it relates to the operation of a busi- 
ness. Topics will include those 
relating to the establishment and 
continuity of business relationships 
including contracts, sales, partner- 
ships, corporations, agency law and 
business ethics, and those regulat- 
ing business activities including 
consumer protection, environmen- 
tal, employment and antitrust laws. 
3 credit hours. 

LA 112 Accounting 
Business Law 

Prerequisite: LA 101. Law of 
agency, employer/employee, part- 
nerships, corporations, security 
and governmental regulation; real 
and person property law; creditors 
rights and bankruptcy; wills and 
trust. 3 credit hours. 

LA 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: LA 101 and junior 
standing. A planned program of 
individual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 3 
credit hours. 



LOGISTICS 

LG 300 Defense Sector Logistics 

Prerequisites: ES 345 and CS 107 
or equivalent. Introduction to 
logistics as practiced in the defense 
industry, the military, and in multi 



Courses 210 



national corporations operating 
foreign installations. Overview of 
logistics, elements, nomenclature, 
techniques, management, and 
computer support. Survey of regu- 
lations, standards and logistics 
products. Identification of logistics 
and its place in defense-related sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 

LG 310 Introduction to Logistics 
Support Analysis 

Prerequisite: LG 300. Definition 
and description of logistics sup- 
port analysis w^ith reference to 
MIL-STD-1388-1A and deriva- 
tive requirements. Survey of inte- 
grated logistics support theory 
and practice and the role of LSA. 
The role of a logistics support 
analysis plan, its method of con- 
struction, and its use in real sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 

LG 320 Reliability and 
Maintainability Fundamentals 

Prerequisite: LG 300. Basic 
description and analysis of the con- 
cepts of reliability and maintain- 
abiliry in large high-technology 
systems. Introduction to quantita- 
tive techniques and quality assur- 
ance. Strategies for optimizing 
effectiveness and in-service sup- 
port. 3 credit hours. 
LG 410 Life Cycle Concepts 
Prerequisite: LG 320. Introduc- 
tion to life cycle concepts in prod- 
uct design, qualify engineering, 
field support, maintenance, train- 
ing and end-use disposal. Tech- 
niques of life cycle costing and the 
construction of life cycle forecasts. 
Product and system warranties, 
and their interface with logistics 
support. 3 credit hours. 



LG 440 Data Management in 
Logistics Systems 
Prerequisite: LG 310. Review of the 
role of data collection, analysis and 
report generation in logistics sys- 
tems management. Uses of comput- 
er-aided management information 
systems, technical data acquisition, 
and software support in logistics 
organization. Requirements for doc- 
umentation, data renewal and the 
generation of integrated logistics 
support plans and reports. 3 credit 
hours. 

LG 490 Logistics Seminar 

Upon completion of LG 300, LG 
310, LG 320, LG 410 and LG 
440 and students pursuing the 
certificate in logistics will be 
required to take this capstone 
seminar. Each student will devel- 
op an experiential case study in 
conjunction with a faculty advis- 
er. This case study will draw on 
material learned in prerequisite 
courses and the student's work 
experience. Each student will be 
required to present the case study 
for critique by colleagues and 
industrial engineering faculty. 
1 credit hour. 



LEGAL STUDIES 



LS 100 Introduction to 
Legal Concepts 

Overview of the American legal 
system in context of historical 
underpinnings. Structural make- 
up, purpose and functions of legal 
system in American society, and 
distinction between civil and crim- 
inal law systems. Introduction to 
major civil law substantive areas, 
including torts, contracts and 



property, legal concepts and rea- 
soning. 3 credits hours. 

LS 201 Legal Ethics & 
Professional Responsibilities 

Prerequisite: PL 222. Study of legal 
ethics, including codes of profes- 
sional responsibility and the legal 
professional's responsibilities in dif- 
ferent types of organizations and 
occupational settings. Analysis and 
discussion of case studies and role 
play. 3 credits hours. 

LS 226 Family Law 

A study of legal relations between 
husband and wife including mar- 
riage, annulment, divorce, alimo- 
ny, separation, adoption, custody 
arrangements and basic procedures 
of family law litigation. 3 credit 
hours. 

LS 229 Legal Communications 

Familiarization with the kinds of 
legal documents and written 
instruments employed by partici- 
pants in the legal process. Recogni- 
tion and understanding of the pur- 
pose of writs, complaints, briefs, 
memoranda, contracts, wills and 
motions. 3 credit hours. 



LS 238 Civil Procedure I 

This course is designed to provide a 
practical knowledge of civil proce- 
dure for the pre-law and paralegal 
student. 3 credit hours. 



LS 239 Civil Procedure II 

An introduction to litigation tech- 
niques and procedures, including 
skills needed to negotiate for civil 
and criminal actions. 3 credit 
hours. 



211 



LS 240 Legal Research and 
Writing I 

An introduction to legal biblio- 
graphical materials. Students will 
learn how to use various kinds of 
law books in solving research 
problems incident to advising 
clients and trying and appealing 
cases. The function of court 
reports, statutes, codes, digests, 
citators, loose-leaf services and 
treatises will be discussed. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

LS 241 Legal Research and 
Writing II 

Prerequisite: LS 240. Practical 
experience in researching and writ- 
ing on realistic legal problems. Spe- 
cific written assignments make use 
of all the library tools. How to pre- 
pare and analyze legal memoranda 
and briefs. 3 credit hours. 

LS 244 Estates and Trusts 
An examination of the legal princi- 
ples and techniques of effective 
estate planning and administra- 
tion. Topics covered include inher- 
itance statutes, preparation and 
execution of wills, and record keep- 
ing practices. 3 credit hours. 

LS 301 Administrative Law and 
Regulation 

Study of the basic principles of law 
for government agencies, structure 
of the federal and Connecticut 
agencies, and major laws governing 
these agencies, including the state 
and federal Administrative Proce- 
dure Acts and Freedom of Informa- 
tion Acts. Overview of the role of 
legal professionals in administra- 
tive practice with practical applica- 
tions. 3 credits hours. 



LS 326 Real Estate Law 

A variety of legal skills in real estate 
law. Special attention given to title, 
operations, mortgage, deeds, leases, 
property taxes, closing procedures 
and documents. 3 credit hours. 



LS 328 Management and 
Administrative Skills 
An examination of the procedures 
and systems necessary to run a 
law office efficiently. Students 
will learn such administrative 
skills as how to interview clients, 
conduct legal correspondence and 
maintain legal records. Proven 
management techniques for keep- 
ing track of filing dates and fees, 
court dockets and calendars are 
also examined. 3 credit hours. 

LS 330 Legal Investigation 

Examines skills needed to conduct 
investigations that are a routine part 
of the practice of law such as princi- 
ples of fact-gathering in a wide range 
of cases (e.g., criminal, divorce, cus- 
tody, housing). 3 credit hours. 

LS 40 1 Alternative Dispute 
Resolution: Models and Practice 

Study of current models of conflict 
resolution, emphasizing mediation 
and restorative justice, and applica- 
tions in legal and organizational 
settings. Students will be trained in 
basic negotiation and mediation 
skills. 3 credit hours. 



LS 430 Computers and the Law 

An analysis of the ways in which 
the advent of the computer has 
affected law and the legal profes- 
sion. Students will explore meth- 
ods of using computers for legal 



research, the effects of computers 
on criminology and the adminis- 
tration of justice, the impact of 
mass data banks on the right to pri- 
vacy and the freedom of choice. 3 
credit hours. 

LS 450-454 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: consent of department 
chair. A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and the instructor. 3 credit hours. 

LS 498 Research Project 

Prerequisite: senior standing and 
consent of department chair. The 
student carries out an original 
research project in a legal setting and 
reports findings. 1 -6 credit hours. 

LS 501/502 Legal Studies 
Internship I and II 

Prerequisite: senior standing and 
completion of common courses for 
the major. Pre-placement classroom 
review of professional office proce- 
dures — including maintaining ap- 
plicable legal records and files, 
responsibilities in handling oral and 
written communications, ethical 
responsibilities, and time and work- 
flow management — followed by 
internship placement for 8 hours 
per week. Regular class discussion 
sessions for analysis, problem solv- 
ing, and skill building during the 
internship placement. 4 credit hours 
each semester. 

LS 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of depart- 
ment chair. An opportunity for the 
student, under the direction of a 
faculty member, to explore and 
acquire competence in a special 
area of interest. 1-3 credit hours. 



Courses 212 



MATHEMATICS 

All prerequisites for the following 
mathematics courses must be strictly 
observed unless waived with permis- 
sion of the mathematics department. 

M 103 Fundamental 
Mathematics 

Required at the inception of the 
program of study of all students 
(day and evening) who do not 
show sufficient competency with 
fundamental arithmetic and alge- 
bra, as determined by placement 
examination. Arithmetic opera- 
tions, algebraic expressions, linear 
equations in one variable, expo- 
nents and polynomials, Cartesian 
coordinates, equation of a straight 
line and simultaneous linear 
equations. (Students placed in M 
103 must successfully complete 
this course before taking any 
other course having mathematical 
content.) Students who take M 
103 will have the total number of 
credits required for graduation 
increased by 3 credits. 3 credit 
hours (4 to 6 meeting hours per 
week). 

M 109 Intermediate Algebra 

Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher 
in M 103 or placement by the 
department. A review of the funda- 
mental operations and an extensive 
study of functions, exponents, rad- 
icals, linear and quadratic equa- 
tions. Additional topics include 
ratio, proportion, variation, pro- 
gression and the binomial theorem. 
This course is intended primarily for 
students whose program of study 
requires calculus. For other students, 
see M 127. 3 credit hours. 



M 11 5 Pre- Calculus 

Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher 
in M 109 or placement by the 
department. Offers the foundation 
needed for the study of calculus. 
Polynomials, algebraic functions, 
elementary point geometry, plane 
analytic trigonometry and proper- 
ties of exponential functions. 4 
credit hours. 
M 117 Calculus I 
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher 
in M 115 or placement by the 
department. The first-year college 
course for majors in mathematics, 
science and engineering; and the 
basic prerequisite for all advanced 
mathematics. Introduces differen- 
tial and integral calculus of func- 
tions of one variable, along with 
plane analytic geometry. 4 credit 
hours. 

M 118 Calculus II 

Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher 
in M 117. Continuation of first- 
year calculus, including methods of 
integration, the fundamental theo- 
rem of calculus, differentiation and 
integration of transcendental func- 
tions, varied applications, infinite 
series and indeterminate forms. 
4 credit hours. 

M 121 Algebraic Structures 

A first course in an orientation to 
abstract mathematics: elementary 
logic, sets, mappings, relations, 
operations, elementary group theo- 
ry. Open to all freshmen and soph- 
omores. 3 credit hours. 

M 127 Finite Mathematics 
Prerequisite: M 103 or placement 
by the department. Functions and 
lines, linear systems, linear pro- 
gramming, mathematics of 
finance, sets and counting, and an 



introduction to probability. Numer- 
ous applications and an introduc- 
tion to computing and computers. 
This course is intended primarily 
for students whose program of study 
does not require calculus. For stu- 
dents preparing to take calculus, see 
M 109. 3 credit hours. 

M 203 Calculus III 

Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher 
in M 118. The calculus of multiple 
variables, covering three-dimen- 
sional topics in analysis, and vector 
analysis, partial differentiation, 
maxima and minima for functions 
of several variables, line integrals, 
multiple integrals, spherical and 
cylindrical polar coordinates. 4 
credit hours. 



M 204 Differential Equations 

Prerequisite: M 203. The solution 
of ordinary differential equations, 
including the use of Laplace trans- 
forms. Existence of solutions, series 
solutions, matrix methods, nonlin- 
ear equations and varied applica- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

M 228 Elementary Statistics 

Prerequisite: M 127. A noncalculus 
based course which includes basic 
probability theory, random variables 
and their distributions, estimation 
and hypothesis testing, regression 
and correlation. Emphasis on an 
applied approach to statistical theory 
with applications chosen from many 
different fields of study. Students 
will be introduced to and make use 
of the computer package SPSS for 
data analysis. Not open to students 
who have taken calculus. 4 credit 
hours. (This course is cross listed 
with P 301 Statistics for the Behav- 
ioral Sciences.) 



213 



M 30 1 Geometry from a 
Modern Viewpoint 

Prerequisite: M 117. A modern 
approach to Euclidean geometry 
with emphasis on proofs; basic 
results on lines, planes, angles, poly- 
gons, circles, spheres; coordinate and 
vector viewpoints. 3 credit hours. 
M 303 Advanced Calculus 
Prerequisite: M 204. A survey 
course in applied mathematics. 
Vector calculus: line and surface 
integrals, integral theorems of 
Green and Stokes, and the diver- 
gence theorem. Complex vari- 
ables: elementary functions, 
Cauchy-Riemann equations, inte- 
gration, Cauchy integral theorem, 
infinite series, calculus of residues 
and conformal mapping. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 305 Discrete Structures 

Prerequisite: M 118; corequisite: 
M 203. Methods of proof, the inte- 
gers, induction, prime numbers, 
recursive algorithms, greatest com- 
mon divisors, the Euclidean algo- 
rithm, the fundamental theorem of 
arithmetic, congruences. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 308 Introduction to 
Real Analysis 

Prerequisite: M 204. Sets and Rinc- 
tions, the real numbers, topology 
of the line, limits, continuity, com- 
pleteness, compactness, connected- 
ness, sequences and series, the 
derivative, the Riemann integral, 
the fundamental theorem of calcu- 
lus, sequences and series of func- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

M 309 Advanced 
Differential Equations 

Prerequisite: M 204. Theoretical 



analysis and applications of non- 
linear differential equations. Phase 
plane and space, perturbation the- 
ory and techniques, series and 
related methods, stability theory 
and techniques and relaxation phe- 
nomena. 3 credit hours. 

M 3 1 1 Linear Algebra 

Prerequisite: M 203. Matrices, sys- 
tems of linear equations and their 
solutions, linear vector spaces, lin- 
ear transformations, eigenvalues 
and eigenvectors. Applications. 
3 credit hours. 

M 32 1 Modern Algebra 

Prerequisites: M 305 or M 311. 
Groups, rings, integral domains, 
fields, polynomials. 3 credit hours. 

M 325 Number Theory 

Prerequisite: M 305. Topics are 
selected from the following: math- 
ematical induction, Euclidean 
algorithm, integers, number theo- 
retic functions, Euler-Fermat theo- 
rems, congruences, quadratic 
residues and Peano axioms. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

M 331 Combinatorics 

Prerequisite: M 311 or permission 
of the department. Problem solv- 
ing using graph theory and combi- 
natorical methods. Topics include 
counting methods, recurrence, 
generating functions, enumeration, 
graphs, trees, coloring problems, 
network flows and matchings. Spe- 
cial emphasis on reasoning which 
underlies combinatorical problem 
solving, algorithm development 
and logical structure of programs. 
3 credit hours. 



M 338 Numerical Analysis 

Prerequisites: M 203 and a stan- 
dard programming language. Top- 
ics include: solutions of algebraic 
and transcendental equations by 
iterative methods; system of linear 
equations (matrix inversion, etc.); 
interpolation, numerical differenti- 
ation and integration; solution of 
ordinary differential equations. 
Scientific and engineering applica- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

M 361 Mathematical Modeling 

Prerequisites: at least junior status 
and M 311. Problem solving 
through mathematical model 
building. Emphasis on applications 
of mathematics to the social, life 
and managerial sciences. Topics are 
selected from probability, graph 
theory, Markov processes, linear 
programming, optimization, game 
theory, simulation. 3 credit hours. 

M 371 Probability and Statistics I 

Prerequisite: M 203. Axiomatic 
study of probability: sample spaces, 
combinatorical analysis, independ- 
ence and dependence, random 
variables, distribution functions, 
moment generating functions, cen- 
tral limit theorem. 3 credit hours. 

M 381 Real Analysis 
Prerequisite: M 308. Foundation 
of analysis, sets and functions, real 
and complex number systems; lim- 
its, convergence and continuity, 
sequences and infinite series, dif- 
ferentiation. 3 credit hours. 

M 403 Techniques in 
Applied Mathematics 

Prerequisite: M 204. Techniques in 
applied analysis including Fourier 
series; orthogonal functions such as 



Courses 214 



Bessel functions, Legendre polyno- 
mials, Chebychev polynomials, 
Laplace and Fourier transforms; 
product solutions of partial differ- 
ential equations and boundary 
value problems. 3 credit hours. 

M 423 Complex Variables 

Prerequisite: M 204. For mathe- 
matics, science and engineering 
students. Review of elementary 
functions and Euler forms; holo- 
morphic functions, Laurent series, 
singularities, calculus of residues, 
contour integration, maximum 
modulus theorem, bilinear and 
inverse transformation, conformal 
mapping, and analytic continua- 
tion. 3 credit hours. 

M 441 Topology 

Prerequisite: M 381 or permission 
of department chair. Topics select- 
ed from the following: Hausdorff 
neighborhood relations: derived, 
open and closed sets; closure; topo- 
logical space; bases; homeomor- 
phisms; relative topology; product 
spaces; separation axioms; metric 
spaces; connectedness and com- 
pactness. 3 credit hours. 

M 450-453 Special Topics 
in Mathematics 

Selected topics in mathematics of 
special or current interest. 3 credit 
hours. 



M 472 Probability and 
Statistics II 

Prerequisite: M 371. Elements of 
the theory of point estimation, 
maximum likelihood estimates, 
theory of testing hypotheses, power 
of a test, confidence intervals, lin- 
ear regression, experimental design 
and analysis of variance, correla- 



tion, and nonparametric tests. 
3 credit hours. 

M 473 Advanced 
Statistical Inference 

Prerequisite: M 472. This course is 
designed to provide an in-depth 
treatment of statistical inference. 
Topics include distribution of 
functions of one or several random 
variables, N-P structure of tests of 
hypothesis, properties of "good" 
estimators and the multivariate 
normal distribution. 3 credit 
hours. 

M 48 1 Linear Models I 

Prerequisite: M 472. This course is 
designed to provide a comprehen- 
sive study of linear regression. Top- 
ics include simple linear regression, 
inference in simple linear regres- 
sion, violations of model assump- 
tions, multiple linear regression 
and the Extra Sum of Squares Prin- 
ciple. 3 credit hours. 

M 482 Linear Models II 

Prerequisite: M 481. Continuation 
of M 481, with an emphasis on 
experimental design. Topics 
include single-factor designs, two- 
factor designs, multiple-factor 
designs and randomized block 
designs. 3 credit hours. 

M 491-499 Department Seminar 

A study of a mathematical topic or 
topics not covered in the above 
courses. Subject of study will be 
announced by the mathematics 
department in advance. A paper 
and/or seminar talk, suitable for 
presentation to all interested math- 
ematics faculty, will be required. 
3 credit hours. 



M 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of faculty 
member and department chair. 
Opportunity for the student, 
under the direction of a faculty 
member, to explore an area of 
interest. This course must be initi- 
ated by the student. 1-3 credit 
hours. 

MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING 

Design elective/required choices are 
indicated by (D) following course tide. 

ME 101 Engineering Graphics 

Fundamentals of orthographic pro- 
jections, pictorial views, auxiliary 
views, sectional views, descriptive 
geometry, dimensioning and toler- 
ancing. Working drawings and 
blueprint reading. Introduction to 
computer-aided drafting in two and 
three dimensions using contempo- 
rary CAD software. 2 credit hours. 

ME 200 Engineering Materials 

Prerequisite: CH 103. A study of 
the properties of the principal engi- 
neering materials of modern tech- 
nology: steels and nonferrous alloys 
and their heat treatment, concrete, 
wood, ceramics and plastics. Gives 
engineers sufficient background to 
aid them in selecting materials and 
setting specifications. 3 credit hours. 

ME 204 Dynamics 

Prerequisites: M 118 , PH 150. 
Free-body diagrams, equilibrium 
of forces, friction. Kinematics and 
dynamics of particles and rigid 
bodies with emphasis on two- 
dimensional problems. Vector rep- 
resentation of motion in rectangu- 
lar, polar and natural coordinates. 



215 



Impulse-momentum and work- 
energy theorems. Rigid bodies in 
translation, rotation and general 
plane motion. 3 credit hours. 

ME 215 Instrumentation 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CE 205, E 225 (may 
be taken concurrently), M.E. Skills 
Workshop. Laboratory experi- 
ments introducing equipment and 
techniques used to measure force, 
static displacement, dynamic 
motion, stress, strain, fluid flow, 
pressure, and temperature. Intro- 
duction to statistical methods, data 
acquisition, data analysis and con- 
trol using microcomputers. 2 cred- 
it hours. 

ME 222 Methods of 
Mechanical Design (D) 

Prerequisites: CE 205, ME 101. 
Introduction to the mechanical 
design process including planning, 
phases of design, methods and doc- 
umentation. Understanding the 
design problem, planning a proj- 
ect, concept generation and evalua- 
tion, design matrix and Pugh's 
method. Product design and gener- 
ation, manufacturing processes, 
cost estimation, concurrent design. 
Product evaluation. Implemen- 
tation of methods via hardware 
design project. 3 credit hours. 

ME 301 Thermodynamics I 

Prerequisites: M 118, PH150. 
Classical thermodynamics treat- 
ment of first and second laws. 
Thermal and caloric equations of 
state. Closed and open systems, 
and steady flow processes. Absolute 
temperature, entropy, combined 
first and second laws. Power and 
refrigeration cycles. 3 credit hours. 



ME 302 Thermodynamics II 

Prerequisites: CS 1 10, M 203 (may 
be taken concurrently), ME 301. 
Extensions and applications of first 
and second laws; availability, com- 
bustion process, ideal gas mixtures. 
Maxwell's relations. HVAC topics. 
Advanced thermodynamic cycles. 3 
credit hours. 

ME 304 Mechanical Behavior 
of Materials 

Prerequisite: ME 200. Detailed 
study of elastic and plastic defor- 
mation of materials at room tem- 
perature and elevated tempera- 
tures. Dislocation theory and 
microplasticity models considered. 
3 credit hours. 

ME 307 Solid Mechanics 

Prerequisites: CE 205 and M 203. 
Elastic behavior of structural ele- 
ments such as beams, columns and 
shafts. Stress and strain at a point. 
Plane stress and plane strain. Stress 
and strain transformations, Mohr's 
circle. Theories of yielding and fail- 
ure. Introduction to the finite ele- 
ment method of stress analysis and 
computer-aided engineering. 

3 credit hours. 

ME 315 Mechanics Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CE 205, ME 204, 
ME 215. Laboratory experiments in 
mechanics of materials, vibrational 
analysis, computer-aided data 
acquisition and analysis. Emphasis 
placed on measurement techniques, 
report writing, and error/statistical 
analysis. 2 credit hours. 

ME 321 Incompressible 
Fluid Flow 

Prerequisites: M 204, ME 204. 
Fluid kinematics, continuity equa- 
tion, vector operations. Momen- 



tum equation for frictionless flow, 
Bernoulli equation with applica- 
tions. Irrotational flow, velocity 
potential, Laplace's equation, 
dynamic pressure and lift. Stream 
function for incompressible flows. 
Rotational flows, vorticity, circula- 
tion, lift and drag. Integral 
momentum analysis. Navier-Stokes 
equation, stress tensor. Newtonian 
fluid. Boundary layer approxima- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

ME 330 Fundamentals of 
Mechanical Design (D) 

Prerequisite: CE 205. Review of 
methods of mechanical design. 
Development of fundamental 
engineering analysis involving 
static and fatigue failure. Topics 
include the maximum shear and 
Von Mises theories of static 
design, safety factor, Soderberg 
and Goodman diagrams for 
fatigue design, modified 

endurance limit, reliability analy- 
sis, statistical considerations and 
stress concentration. Introduction 
to codes and standards. Practical 
applications. 3 credit hours. 

ME 343 Mechanisms (D) 

Prerequisite: ME 204. Graphic and 
analytic methods for determining 
displacements, velocities and accel- 
erations of machine components. 
Applications to simple mechanisms 
such as linkages, cams, gears. 
Design project. 3 credit hours. 
ME 344 Mechanics of Vibration 
Prerequisites: M 204, ME 204. 
The mathematical relationships 
necessary for the solution of prob- 
lems involving the vibration of 
lumped and continuous systems. 
Damping, free and forced motions, 
resonance, isolation, energy meth- 
ods, balancing. Single, two and 



Courses 216 



multiple degrees oi freedom. 
Vibration measurement. 3 credit 
hours. 

ME 355 Interfacing and Control 
of Mechanical Devices (D) 
Prerequisites: CS 110, EE 212 or 
consent of instructor. A practical, 
hands-on approach to connecting, 
monitoring and control of thermo 
sensors, motors, encoders and 
other sensors and transducers using 
a PC and a multipurpose expan- 
sion board. Topics include hard- 
ware connections, voltage input 
and output, motor-generator and 
motor-encoder feedback, stepper 
motors, thermal control and digital 
switching. 3 credit hours. 

ME 404 Heat and Mass Transfer 

Prerequisites: M 204, ME 302, ME 
321 (may be taken concurrently). 
Conduction in solids, solution of 
multidimensional conduction prob- 
lems, unsteady conduction, radia- 
tion, boundary layer and convec- 
tion. Introduction to mass transfer. 
Lectures include occasional demon- 
strations of convection, radiation, 
heat exchangers. 3 credit hours. 

ME 407 Solar Energy 
Thermal Processes (D) 
Prerequisite: ME 404 (may be 
taken concurrently). Introduction 
to the fundamentals of solar energy 
thermal processes including solar 
radiation, flat plate and focusing 
collectors, energy storage, hot 
water heating, cooling and auxil- 
iary system components. Emphasis 
on the design and evaluation of 
systems as they pertain to commer- 
cial and residential buildings. 3 
credit hours. 

ME 408 Advanced Mechanics 



Prerequisites: M 204, ME 204. Plane 
and spatial motion of particles and 
rigid bodies, inertia tensor, relative 
motion, gyroscopes, central force 
motion. Lagrangian and Hamilton- 
ian methods. 3 credit hours. 

ME 411 Fundamentals of 
Thermo/Fluid Design (D) 
Corequisites: ME 302, ME 330. 
Introduction to the design of spe- 
cific thermal, heat and fluid devices 
and systems as they apply to practi- 
cal design problems. Review of 
design methodology and basic 
equations in thermal sciences. 
Group design studies in each of the 
three basic areas of heat exchang- 
ers, prime movers and piping sys- 
tems. 3 credit hours. 

ME 415 Thermo/Fluids 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites ME 215, ME 321, 
ME 404 (may be taken concur- 
rently). A survey of experiments 
and laboratory investigations cov- 
ering the areas of fluid mechanics, 
thermodynamics, heat transfer and 
gas dynamics. Analog and digital 
data acquisition and analysis. 2 
credit hours. 

ME 422 Compressible Fluid Flow 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321, 
ME 404. Compressible fluid flow 
with emphasis on one-dimensional 
ducted steady flows with heat trans- 
fer, frictional effects, shock waves 
and combined efi^ects. Introductory 
considerations of two- and three- 
dimensional flows. Applications to 
propulsive devices. Occasional 
demonstrations accompany the lec- 
tures. 3 credit hours. 

ME 426 Turbomachinery (D) 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321. 



Review of basic thermodynamics 
and fluid mechanics. Dimensional 
analysis. Specific speed. Classifica- 
tion of turbomachines. Cavitation. 
Losses. Definitions of efficiency. 
Theories of turbomachines. Design 
considerations for stator blades and 
rotor blades. Computer-aided 
design. 3 credit hours. 

ME 427 Computer-Aided 
Engineering (D) 

Prerequisite: ME 307. Integration 
of computers into the design cycle. 
Interactive computer modeling and 
analysis. Geometrical modeling 
with wire frame, surface, and solid 
models. Finite element modeling 
and analysis. Problems solved 
involving structural, dynamic, and 
thermal characteristics of mechani- 
cal devices. 3 credit hours. 

ME 431 Mechanical 
Engineering Design I (D) 

Prerequisites: ME 330 and senior 
status or instructor's consent. Basic 
aspects of power transmission. Top- 
ics include: friction train, belt and 
chain drives, gear drive, planetary 
and differential trains. Study of air 
and hydraulic components and 
analysis of machine elements 
including shafi:s, springs, clutches, 
bearings, gears. In-house and indus- 
trial projects in solids and 
thermal/fluids areas. Student groups 
determine problem requirements 
and objectives and decide on the 
best design alternatives. Oral project 
presentations. Course available only 
in fall semester. 3 credit hours. 

ME 432 Mechanical 
Engineering Design II (D) 

Prerequisite: ME 431. Projects initi- 
ated in ME 431 are carried to com- 
pletion by the same groups. Detailed 



217 



design drawings and prototype con- 
struction, testing and evaluation. 
Midterm and final oral presentations 
and comprehensive written reports. 
Course available only in spring 
semester. 3 credit hours. 

ME 435 Advanced 
Mechanical Design (D) 
Prerequisites: ME 321, ME 431. 
Selected advanced topics related to 
the design of machine elements 
such as hydrodynamic theory of 
lubrication and principles of 
hydraulic machines with applica- 
tion to hydraulic couplings. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

ME 438 Systems Dynamics 
and Control 

Prerequisites: ME 321, ME 344. 
Modeling, analysis and design of 
dynamic systems with feedback. 
Response and stability analysis. 
Methods include Routh-Hurwitz, 
root locus. Bode plots, Nyquist sta- 
bility criterion. Design and com- 
pensation methods. Applications 
in mechanical, thermal, electrical 
systems. Project. 3 credit hours. 

ME 443 Introduction to 
Flight Propulsion 

Prerequisites: ME 422 and consent 
of instructor. A senior course 
designed for those students who 
intend to work or pursue further 
studies in the aerospace field. 
Among the topics covered are: det- 
onation and deflagration, intro- 
ductory one-dimensional non- 
steady gas flows, basic concepts of 
turbomachinery and survey of con- 
temporary propulsive devices. 
Shock tube, supersonic wind tun- 
nel and flame propagation demon- 
strations accompany the lectures. 3 
credit hours. 



ME 450 Special Topics in 
Mechanical Engineering 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
In-depth study of topics chosen 
Irom areas of particular and current 
interest to mechanical engineering 
students. 1-6 credit hours. 

ME 512 Senior Seminar 

Open to seniors with chair's 
approval. Individual oral presenta- 
tions by students of material 
researched on topics selected by 
students and faculty at the begin- 
ning of the term. 3 credit hours. 

ME 599 Independent Study (D) 

Prerequisites: consent of faculty 
supervisor and approval of depart- 
ment chair. Independent study 
provides an opportunity for the 
student to explore an area of special 
interest under faculty supervision. 
1-3 credit hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 



MANAGEMENT 



MG 115 Fundamentals of 
Management 

A course in introductory manage- 
ment that explores the basics of 
both theory and practice. Topics 
include and are related to the five 
functions of management: plan- 
ning, organizing, staffing, leading 
and controlling. Enrollment limited 
to nonbusiness majors and/or A.S. 
Business Administration students 
only. 3 credit hours. 

MG 120 Development of 
American Sports 

A survey of the American sports 
industry and how it relates to soci- 
ety: issues and problems in nation- 
al and international sport activities. 



An analysis of current sport issues 
and trends. 3 credit hours. 

MG 310 Management and 
Organization 

Prerequisites: A 1 01 , A 1 02 or A 1 1 2, 
EC 133, EC 134 and junior stand- 
ing. A study of management systems 
as they apply to all organizations. 
Managerial functions, principles of 
management, and other aspects of 
the management process are exam- 
ined. 3 credit hours. 

MG 317 Entrepreneurship and 
New Business Development 

Prerequisite: MG 310. Covers the 
entrepreneurial process from the 
conception to operation of a new 
business. It will concentrate on the 
characteristics of entrepreneurs and 
the process by which they turn ideas 
into new business. Students will also 
learn about the process of new busi- 
ness development in the large corpo- 
ration and study the effect of corpo- 
rate culture on the success of new 
ventures. 3 credit hours. 

MG 327 Business Planning 

Prerequisite: MG 317. Covers the 
element of planning for a new 
business. It identifies the goals, 
objectives and strategies that an 
entrepreneur must articulate 
toward the fulfillment of that 
entrepreneurial dream. The main 
focus of the course is to highlight 
the milestones toward the success 
of the new venture. 3 credit hours. 

MG 330 Management of 
Sports Industries 

Prerequisite: MG 120 and junior 
standing. A survey of the principles 
of management applicable to the 
administration of aspects of sports 
enterprises: planning, controlling, 



Courses 218 



organizing, staffing and directing of require interpersonal relationships 
the various activities necessary for in daily decision making. 3 credit 
effective fiinctioning. 3 credit hours. hours. 



MG 33 1 Management of 
Human Resources 

Prerequisite: MG 310. A survey of 
the industrial relations and the per- 
sonnel management system of an 
organization. Manpower planning- 
/forecasting, labor markets, selection 
and placement, training and devel- 
opment, compensation, govern- 
ment/employer and labor/manage- 
ment relations. 3 credit hours. 

MG 332 Labor Management 
Relations 

Prerequisites: MG 310, MG 331. A 
study of the development of Ameri- 
can trade unions and the various 
stages of their relationship with busi- 
ness ownership and management, 
their structure and strategies, labor 
legislation and their impact. Negoti- 
ations strategies; causes of and strate- 
gies for resolving labor conflict. 
Attaining union-management coop- 
eration. 3 credit hours. 

MG 333 Management of 
Compensation 

Prerequisite: MG 310, MG 331. A 
study of all aspects of the compensa- 
tion process: criteria used in devel- 
oping pay scales, merit systems and 
fringe benefits; techniques for 
administration and control of estab- 
lished systems. 3 credit hours. 

MG 335 Public Relations in 
Sports 

Prerequisite: MG 120 and junior 
standing. A study of individual and 
group behavior as they relate to the 
press, politicians, parents, broad- 
casting and other groups that 



MG 350 Management of 
Workforce Diversity 

Prerequisite: MG 310. This course 
explores issues of social identity, 
social and cultural diversity, and 
societal manifestations of oppres- 
sion as they relate to the workplace. 
Workforce demographics are rapid- 
ly evolving due to changes in 
birthrates, immigration, legal sys- 
tems, social attitudes, and econom- 
ic expansion. Managing businesses 
and other organizations will 
require not just contemporary 
knowledge and technology, but 
will require the expertise to manage 
increasing workforce diversity. 3 
credit hours. 

MG 415 Multinational 
Management 

Prerequisites: IB 312, MG 310. An 
analysis and examination of man- 
agement and organizational behav- 
ior against a background of diversi- 
fied cultural systems. 3 credit 
hours. 

MG 417 Managing an 
Entrepreneurial Venture 

Prerequisites: FI 313, MG 317. 
Covers the principles of managing 
a growing entrepreneurial business. 
Students will learn how to antici- 
pate and deal with problems pecu- 
liar to a growing business. The 
emphasis will be on innovation, 
creativity and managing opportu- 
nities, in contrast to management 
of ongoing business that is based 
on efficiency and effectiveness. 3 
credit hours. 



MG 420 Sports Facility 
Management 

Prerequisites: MG 120, MG 310. 
An examination of how sports 
facilities like coliseums, municipal 
and college stadiums, and multi- 
purpose civic centers are managed. 
Among the topics included are: 
financial management of sports 
facilities, booking and scheduling 
events, box office management, 
staging and event production, per- 
sonnel management, concessions 
and merchandising management. 
3 credit hours. 

MG 425 Sports Industries 
and the Law 

Prerequisites: MG 120, MG 310. 
Legal aspects as they relate to pro- 
fessional and amateur sport institu- 
tions. An analysis of legal problems 
and issues confronting the sports 
manager: suits against the organi- 
zational structure, safety, collective 
bargaining and arbitration, and 
antitrust violations. 3 credit hours. 

MG 430 Financial Management 
for Sports Administration 

Prerequisite: FI 313, MG 310. 
Methods and procedures as they 
apply to sports administration, tax- 
ation, purchasing, cost analysis, 
budgeting and the financial prob- 
lems dealing with mass media. 
3 credit hours. 

MG 450-454 Special Topics 
in Business 

Prerequisite: MG 310. Junior-level 
standing required unless specified 
in course schedule description. 
Special studies in business and 
public administration. Work may 
include study and analysis of spe- 
cific problems within units of busi- 



219 



ness or government and applica- corporate culture. Its development 

tion of theory to those problems, and influence on business strate- 

programs of research related to a gies, organizational performance, 

student's discipline, or special proj- development and change, and 

ects. Several sessions may run con- effects on managerial effectiveness, 

currently. 3 credit hours. 3 credit hours. 



MG 455 Total Quality 
Management 

Prerequisite: MG 310, QA 217. 
This course is an introduction to 
Total Quality Management con- 
cepts and techniques. Achieving 
employee involvement, low cost 
production, reducing low quality 
deficiencies, and increasing cus- 
tomer satisfaction will be the 
main focus of the course. 3 credit 
hours. 

MG 457 Family Business 
Management 

Prerequisite: MG 310. Provides a 
fundamental understanding of 
family business management, 
including historical and theoretical 
rudiments; transition stages, con- 
flict resolution; family systems; and 
succession. Case studies of classic 
family businesses will be used for 
discussion and analysis. 3 credit 
hours. 

MG 467 Franchising 

Prerequisites: FI 313, MG 310. 
Covers the franchising operation 
both from the franchisers and fran- 
chisee's perspectives. It provides the 
student the framework to evaluate 
the feasibility of extending a new 
business into a franchise and the 
potential profitability of engaging 
in a franchise operation. 3 credit 
hours. 



MG 512 Contemporary Issues 
in Business and Society 

Prerequisite: MG 310 and senior 
standing. A rigorous examination of 
competing concepts of the role of 
business in society. A capstone, inte- 
grative course relating the firm to its 
environment including issues arising 
from aggregate social, political, legal 
and economic factors. 3 credit hours. 

MG 515 Management Seminar 

Prerequisite: MG 310 and senior 
standing. Introduction to contem- 
porary publications and the findings 
of research study reports. Analysis, 
interpretation and determination of 
impact of publications on the theory 
and practice of management. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

MG 517 Practical Field Studies 

Prerequisite: MG 417. Practical 
training for students minoring in 
Entrepreneurship. Students will 
have an opportunity to apply their 
conceptual knowledge to a real 
business situation. This course is 
restricted to seniors. 3 credit hours. 

MG 520 Current Issues in 
Human Resource Management 

Prerequisites: MG 310, MG 331. 
Examine research findings and cur- 
rent literature relevant to issues 
affecting personnel functions in the 
organization. 3 credit hours. 



MG 470 Management of MG 550 Business Policy 

Corporate Culture Prerequisites: FI 313, MG 310, 

Prerequisites: MG 310. A study of MK 300. An examination of orga- 



nizational policies from the view- 
point of top-level executives, and a 
development of analytic frame- 
works for achieving the goals of the 
total organization. Discussion of 
cases and development of oral and 
written skills. 3 credit hours. 

MG 597 Practicum 

Prerequisite: MG 310 or MG 330. 
A required course in certain pro- 
grams and majors that provides 
opportunity for students to devel- 
op networks and gain practical 
experience within a selected focus 
industry. 3 credit hours. 

MG 598 Internship 

Prerequisite: MG 310. On-the-job 
experience in selected organizations 
in management. 3 credit hours. 

MG 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: MG 310. Indepen- 
dent study on a project of interest 
to the student under the direction 
of a faculty member designated by 
the department chair. 3 credit 
hours. 



MARKETING 



MK 300 Principles of Marketing 
Prerequisites: EC 133 or EC 134 
and junior standing. The funda- 
mental functions of marketing 
involving the flow of goods and 
services from producers to con- 
sumers. Marketing methods of 
promotion, pricing, product deci- 
sions and distribution channels. 
3 credit hours. 

MK 302 Organizational 
Marketing 

Prerequisite: MK 300. Practices 
and policies in the distribution of 



Courses 220 



industrial goods including pur- 
chasing, market analysis, channels 
of distribution, pricing, competi- 
tive practices and operating costs. 
3 credit hours. 

MK 305 Consumer Behavior 

Prerequisite: MK 300. A study of 
the principal comprehensive mar- 
keting models which focus on buyer 
decision processes. Topics include 
brand switching decisions, measures 
of media effectiveness, market seg- 
mentation and other marketing 
techniques. 3 credit hours. 

MK 307 Advertising 
and Promotion 

Prerequisite: MK 300. The design, 
management and evaluation of the 
various communications programs 
involved in marketing and public 
relations. 3 credit hours. 

MK 316 Sales Management 

Prerequisite: MK 300. The man- 
agement of a sales organization. 
Recruiting, selecting, training, 
supervision, motivation and com- 
pensation of sales personnel. 
3 credit hours. 

MK 32 1 Retail Management 

Prerequisite: MK 300. Survey of the 
problems and opportunities in the 
retail distribution field including a 
basic understanding of buying, sell- 
ing and promotion of the retail con- 
sumer market. 3 credit hours. 

MK 326 Overview of 
E-Commerce 

Prerequisite: MK 300 and junior 
standing. A review of issues in e- 
commerce. Technologies available 
for digitalization and transmission 
are surveyed. Different uses of 
internets, intranets, extranets and 
Web pages are discussed. B2B sales 



and supply chain management are 
introduced. Available security and 
payment systems are compared. 
The impact of e-commerce and e- 
tail on business structure, channel 
conflicts, and alliances are intro- 
duced. 3 credit hours. 

MK 327 E-Commerce 
Consumer Applications 

Prerequisite: MK 300 and junior 
standing. E-commerce marketing 
to consumers sells physical, digital, 
and service products through the 
Internet. Key issues in selling these 
products will be discussed includ- 
ing advertising, privacy, intellectual 
property and contract issues. Web 
site usability will be examined. Stu- 
dents will create a simple Web 
page. Then, e-business software 
will be discussed and demonstrated 
for on-line catalog, inventory data- 
bases (ERP), transaction process- 
ing, customer records, shipping 
and security. 3 credit hours. 

MK 402 Marketing of Services 

Prerequisite: MK 300. The market- 
ing of services, including services- 
based market planning, marketing 
mix, core marketing strategies and 
trends, and the essential differences 
between product and services- 
based marketing. 3 credit hours. 

MK 442 Marketing Research 
in the Global Environment 

Prerequisites: MK 300, QA 217. 
Research as a component of the 
marketing information system. 
Research design, sampling meth- 
ods, data interpretation and man- 
agement of the marketing research 
fiinction. 3 credit hours. 

MK 450 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: MK 300, junior stand- 
ing Coverage of new and emerging 



topics and applications in marketing 
theory and practice. The format may 
include both traditional classroom 
activities and innovative group proj- 
ects. 3 credit hours. 

MK 470 Marketing Channels 

Prerequisite: MK 300. The design 
and administration of relationships 
for the successful distribution, 
shipping and inventory manage- 
ment of products, both domestical- 
ly and internationally. Also includ- 
ed are channel conflicts and chan- 
nel control. 3 credit hours. 

MK 515 Marketing Management 

Prerequisite: MK 300 and senior 
standing. The analysis, planning 
and control of the marketing effort 
within the firm. Emphasis on case 
analysis. A marketing capstone 
course. 3 credit hours. 

MK 598 Marketing Internship 

Prerequisite: MK 300. Supervised 
field experience for qualified stu- 
dents in areas related to their 
major. 3 credit hours. 

MK 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: MK 300. A planned 
program of individual study under 
the supervision of a member of the 
faculty. 3 credit hours. 



MULTIMEDIA 

MM 301 Introduction 
to Multimedia 

Prerequisite: introductory comput- 
er course (core curriculum require- 
ment). The three goals of this 
course are: (1) to provide students 
with the necessary multimedia 
background and theory; (2) to dis- 
cuss the basic building blocks of 



221 



multimedia — tcxr, images, anima- 
tion, video and sound; and (3) to 
learn the practical elements of 
making multimedia and the use of 
authoring software. 3 credit hours. 

MM 311 Advanced Multimedia 

Prerequisite: MM 301. This course 
will first deal with the advanced ele- 
ments of multimedia. Hardware and 
software tools will be described in 
detail. Students will then be intro- 
duced to the step-by-step creative 
and organizing process that results in 
a finished multimedia project: the 
technology, user interface design and 
graphic production techniques. The 
course will emphasize such topics as 
how to structure information, how 
to anticipate user experience and 
how to generate visually compelling 
interfaces. 3 credit hours. 

MM 312 Web Site Creation 

Prerequisite: MM 301 or permis- 
sion oi instructor. An introduction 
to web page creation and design. 
This course will address some of 
the most important topics for web 
site designers: site evaluation and 
design, content, structure, layout 
and audience. 3 credit hours. 

MM 401 Multimedia Seminar 

Prerequisite: MM 311. This course 
will cover more advanced elements 
of multimedia. Current technical 
advances and artistic trends will be 
discussed in detail. Students will be 
reintroduced to the creative and 
organizing process that results in a 
finished multimedia project, and 
they will become familiarized with 
some of the software tools (HTML 
editors) used to design and imple- 
ment an interactive Web page. 3 
credit hours. 



MM 450 Special Topics in 
Multimedia 

Study of selected topics of special 
or current interest. 3 credit hours. 



MARINE BIOLOGY 



MR 200 Fundamentals 
of Oceanography 

Prerequisites: BI121-122 or BI 253- 
254, and CH 115-116. Investiga- 
tion of the major aspects of geologi- 
cal, chemical, physical and biological 
oceanography. Human impacts are 
also reviewed. 3 credit hours. 

MR 300 Marine Ecology 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 320, BI 350. 
Investigation of ecological struc- 
ture and dynamics in marine and 
estuarine habitats at organismal, 
population, community and 
ecosystem levels. Geographic 
aspects and human interactions 
with marine ecosystems are also 
considered. Designed around spe- 
cific topics covered in lecture, the 
laboratory includes investigation of 
different types of estuarine and 
coastal habitats, field and laborato- 
ry techniques, and design of basic 
and applied marine ecological 
investigations. Some required 
weekend field classes. Laboratory 
fee; 4 credit hours. 

MR 310 Marine Botany with 
Laboratory 

Prerequisites: BI 122 or BI 254, 
MR 200. A survey of plant and 
algae taxa inhabiting the marine 
and estuarine environment. 
Emphasis will be placed on the 
form and function of the major 
groups anad their adaptation to the 
marine environment. The labora- 



tory section will include exercises 
in lower plant taxonomy and mor- 
phology. Experiments in plant 
physiology and field trips to study 
intertidal plant communities will 
be included. Laboratory fee; 
4 credit hours. 

MR 320 Marine Pollution 

Prerequisite: MR 300. A classifica- 
tion of the different forms of pollu- 
tion in the marine environment. 
The fate and transport of different 
pollutants will be discussed as will 
the effects of pollutants on coastal 
and open marine ecosystems. 
3 credit hours. 

MR 330 Coastal Resources 
and Management 

Prerequisite: MR 300. Examination 
of natural coastal resources, human 
uses and alterations, federal and 
international regulations shaping 
activities in the coastal zone and 
coastal management at the interna- 
tional, federal, state and local levels. 
Some weekend field classes may be 
required. 3 credit hours. 

MR 331 Marine Conservation 
and Restoration 

Prerequisite: MR 300. An investi- 
gation into the conservation of 
marine resources and the science of 
habitat recovery and restoration. 
Topics will include fisheries conser- 
vation, case studies of restored 
coastal habitats, assessment proce- 
dures and evaluation of ecological 
function in restored habitats. 3 
credit hours. 

MR 410 Marine Aquaculture and 
Biotechnology 

Prerequisite: MR 300. An exami- 
nation ol marine aquaculture and 
the use of marine resources in 



Courses 222 



developing biotechnological prod- 
ucts. The history of aquaculture 
and current aquaculture practices 
throughout the world are reviewed. 
Lectures are augmented by visits to 
commercial establishments and 
aquaculture research laboratories. 
The second portion of the course 
will focus on the development of 
marine biotechnology, marine 
products and the relationship 
between aquaculture and marine 
biotechnology. Some required 
weekend field classes. 3 credit 
hours. 

MR 420 Marine Biogeochemistry 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: CH 115-118, MR 
300. A comprehensive study of the 
biogeochemistry of marine waters 
and sediments. Emphasis will be 
on biogeochemical cycling of key 
elements in marine and estuarine 
ecosystems and their role in global 
processes. Chemical analysis and 
field collection techniques together 
with experimentation into the par- 
titioning of chemical species 
between sediment, water and biota 
will be conducted in the laboratory 
portion of the class. Laboratory fee; 
4 credit hours. 

MR 501-502 Senior Project in 
Marine Biology I and II 

Prerequisite: marine biology major 
with senior standing. Indiv- 
idual/group-based research in 
marine biology. Students will devel- 
op specific research projects, con- 
duct literature searches, plan and 
conduct experiments, analyze the 
data and present their findings in a 
written report and at a student con- 
ference at the end of the second 
semester. 3 credit hours each term. 



MR 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: marine biology 
major, consent of the department. 
Weekly conferences with adviser. 
Opportunity for the student, 
under the direction of a faculty 
member, to explore an area of per- 
sonal interest. A written report of 
the work carried out is required. 3 
credit hours. 



MUSIC 



MU 106 Chorus 

Styles of group singing, survey of 
choral music literature from 
around the world. 3 credit hours. 

MU 1 1 1 Introduction to Music 

Basic forms and styles of music in 
the Western World: music appreci- 
ation. 3 credit hours. 

MU 112 Introduction to 
World Music 

Non-Western musical styles, their 
cultures and aesthetics; music of 
the indigenous cultures of the 
Americas and the advanced musics 
of the Near East and Far East; 
emphasis on India, the Orient, 
Southeast Asia, Africa and Indone- 
sia. 3 credit hours. 

MU 116 Performance 

Open to all students interested in 
ensembles or private instruction. 
Students with adequate scholastic 
standing may carry this course for 
credit in addition to a normal pro- 
gram. 1-8 credit hours; maximum 
3 credit hours per semester. 

MU 125 Elementary 
Music Theory 

A one-semester introduction to the 
basic principles of music, primarily 



for students who wish to gain insight 
into the fiindamental structures and 
workings of the art form. Music 
majors who have not successfiilly 
passed the department placement 
examination must enroll in MU 1 25 
and MU 126. Topics include nota- 
tion, scales, key signatures, time sig- 
natures, staflF recognition, intervals, 
triads. Non-music majors are not 
required to enroll in the laboratory. 
3 credit hours. 

MU 126 Elementary Music 
Theory Laboratory 

Exercises in sight-singing, solfege, 
melodic and rhythmic dictation, 
and music notation. Should be 
taken concurrently with MU 125. 
1 credit hour. 

MU 150-151 Introduction to 
Music Theory I and II 

Fundamentals of music: notation, 
physical and acoustical founda- 
tions; harmony and melody; 
modality, tonality, atonality; con- 
sonance and dissonance; tension; 
introductory composition; and 
ear training. 3 credit hours each 
term. 

MU 175-176 Musicianship 
I and II 

Prerequisites: MU 111 or MU 112; 
MU 150. Development of practical 
skills essential to performers and 
ensemble directors: ear training, 
sight singing, dictation, transcrip- 
tion, arranging, notation, score writ- 
ing. 3 credit hours each term. 

MU 198-199 Introduction to 
American Music I and II 

Music of the North American con- 
tinent from the Puritans to the 
present day; both European and 
non-European musical traditions, 
with emphasis on twentieth-centu- 



223 



ry developments. 3 credit hours 
each term. 

MU 201-202 Analysis and History 
of European Art Music I and II 
The growth of Western art music 
from its beginnings to the present 
day. Analysis of musical master- 
pieces on a technical and concep- 
tual basis. 3 credit hours each 
term. 

MU211 History of Rock 

Study of rock music as a musical 
tradition and social, political and 
economic phenomenon. Ethno- 
musicological and historical exami- 
nation of rock from its pre- 1955 
roots to the present. 3 credit hours. 

MU221 Film Music 

Designed for both music and com- 
munication majors. Introduction 
to the art, science and history of 
musical scores in film. Class work 
includes viewing and analysis of 
films with significant cuing and an 
introduction to the musical reper- 
toire available to the film maker. 3 
credit hours. 

MU 250-251 Theory and 
Composition 1 and II 
Investigation of music theory in 
various parts of the world, includ- 
ing the Western art tradition. Exer- 
cises in the composition of music 
within these theoretical constructs. 
Ear training and keyboard harmo- 
ny. 3 credit hours each term. 

MU 261 Introduction to the 
Music Industry 

An introduction to the music 
industry from the artist's point of 
view. Provides guidance to musi- 
cians and/or songwriters trying to 
break into the record industry. 
Topics include: overview ol the 



music industry, songwriting and 
publishing, the copyright law, 
music licensing, artist manage- 
ment: agents and attorneys, and 
recording contracts. 3 credit hours. 

MU 299 Problems of Music 

Music as an art form throughout 
the world. Music aesthetics and its 
relationship to the performance 
and composition of music. 3 credit 
hours. 

MU 300 Studies in Music I 
Area studies in music and its parent 
culture. Cultural theory as related to 
the music; instruments of the area 
and their etymologies; performance 
practices; the social role of music, 
both art and folk. Areas offered 
depend on availability of staff: 
China, Japan, the Near East, the 
Indian subcontinent, Africa, Ameri- 
can Indian, Afro-American, Latin 
American, the VVnglo-Celtic tradi- 
tion and others. 3 credit hours. 

MU 301 Recording Fundamentals 
Prerequisite: CO 103, PH 100 or 
PH 150. A study of the fundamen- 
tals of sound recording technique 
and methodology: acoustics, basic 
electronics, the decibel, magnet- 
ism, microphones, microphone 
placement, tape recorders, tape for- 
mats, mixers, signal processing and 
monitoring systems. This course 
also emphasizes the importance of 
sound aesthetics and ethics in the 
sound recording process. 3 credit 
hours. 

MU 311-312 Multitrack 
Recording I and II 

Prerequisite: MU 301. Two semes- 
ter course in the technique and 
methodology of multitrack studio 
and live recording. Includes 



detailed study of multiple tracking, 
mixing consoles, microphones, 
tape recorders, signal processors, 
studio procedures, sound synthesis, 
MIDI and digital audio. Also 
emphasizes the use of computers in 
the recording studio. Laboratory 
fee; 3 credit hours per semester. 

MU 321 Sound Synthesis/MIDI 

Prerequisite: MU 301. A study of 
the use of synthesizers, drum 
machines, sound modules and 
computers in the recording studio. 
Using a combination of 
lecture/demonstrations as well as 
lab hours, students will explore the 
physics of sound, sound synthesis, 
instrument control. Musical 
Instruments Digital Interface 
(MIDI) and computers. Special 
emphasis will be placed on current 
sequencing, notation and printing 
software. 3 credit hours. 

MU 322 Sound System Design 
and Maintenance 
Prerequisite: MU 311. This course 
covers the basics of sound system 
troubleshooting and maintenance. 
Topics include sound systems, the 
decibel, reading specs and dia- 
grams, basic electronics, cabling, 
and test equipment. 3 credit hours. 

MU 350 Studies in Music II 
Area studies in musical forms; their 
history, evolution, and resultant 
metamorphoses; performance 
practices and extant forms. Areas 
offered depend upon availability of 
staff 3 credit hours. 

MU 361 Production, 
Promotion and Distribution 

Prerequisite: MU 261. An 
overview of the music industry 
from the record company's per- 



Courses 224 



spective. Provides guidance to 
music enthusiasts who want to 
become record company execu- 
tives, sales managers, producers, 
etc. Topics include: record compa- 
ny administration; business aspects 
of record production; promotion, 
publicity, and distribution; record- 
ing studio management; radio sta- 
tion programming and manage- 
ment; music videos; the retail 
music store. 3 credit hours. 

MU 362 Legal Issues, 
Copyrights and Contracts 

Prerequisite: MU 261. A compre- 
hensive overview of the legal proce- 
dures, timings and agreements 
used in the music industry. 
Includes detailed study of the cur- 
rent copyright law, publishing con- 
tracts, licensing, the manager 
and/or agent agreement, the record 
company contract, AFM and 
AFTRA agreements, and ethical 
considerations in the music indus- 
try. 3 credit hours. 

MU 401-402 Recording 
Seminar/Project I and II 

Prerequisite: MU 312. Each stu- 
dent will complete a professional 
quality recording production or 
research and development project. 
Work may consist of internship or 
Co-op experience in a professional 
recording studio. Seminar will also 
include presentations on areas of 
professional interest such as career 
opportunities and new develop- 
ment in studio technique and tech- 
nology. Laboratory fee; 3 credit 
hours each term. 

MU 416 Advanced Performance 

Prerequisite: consent of the depart- 
ment staff and a faculty adviser. 
Preparation and presentation of an 



instrumental or vocal performance 
indicating sufficient proficiency to 
warrant the awarding of a degree in 
music. 3 credit hours. 

MU 450 Special Topics in Music 

Study of selected topics of special 
or current interest. 3 credit hours 

MU 461-462 Internship in the 
Music Industry I and II 

Prerequisite: MU 361 and MU 
362. The purpose of this course is 
to provide the student with 
advanced on-the-job training via 
placement as an apprentice/intern 
in music industry companies such 
as recording studios, radio stations, 
music stores, record companies, 
etc. 3 credit hours each term. 

MU 500-502 Seminars in 
Advanced Research 

Prerequisite: permission of instruc- 
tor. Bibliographical studies of 
major world music areas; investiga- 
tion of current and historical musi- 
cological theories, analysis and crit- 
icism of musicological area litera- 
tures. 3 credit hours each term. 

MU 550 Studies in Urban Ethnic 
Music 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
The music tradition of inner-city 
ethnic groups; emphasis on the 
operation of the oral tradition in 
the preservation of cultural values 
and customs as evidenced through 
music. Classroom discussion will 
be balanced by field research in the 
urban vicinity. 3 credit hours. 

MU 599 Independent Study 

Opportunity for the student under 
the direction of a faculty member to 
explore an area of personal interest. 
This course must be initiated by the 



student. 1-3 credit hours per semes- 
ter with a maximum of 1 2 hours. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Pill Introduction to 
Psychology 

Understanding human behavior. 
Motivation, emotion, learning, 
personality development and intel- 
ligence as they relate to normal and 
deviant behavior. Applying psycho- 
logical knowledge to everyday per- 
sonal and societal problems. 3 
credit hours. 

P 212 Business and 
Industrial Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 111. Psychological 
principles and research as they 
apply to the problems of working 
with people in organizations. 
Analysis of problems and deci- 
sions in this use of human 
resources, including selection and 
placement, criterion measure- 
ment, job design, motivation. 3 
credit hours. 

P 216 Psychology of 
Human Development 

Prerequisite: Pill. Human devel- 
opment over the life cycle-concep- 
tion through death: the changing 
societal and institutional frame- 
work, key concepts and theoretical 
approaches, understanding devel- 
opment through biography, child 
rearing and socialization here and 
abroad. 3 credit hours. 

P 301 Statistics for the 
Behavioral Sciences 

Prerequisite: M 127. Concepts and 
assumptions underlying statistical 
methods essential to design and 
interpretation of research on 



225 



human subjects. Fundamental 
descriptive and inferential meth- 
ods. This course includes training 
in the use of a computer statistics 
program. 4 credit hours. (This 
course is crosslisted with M 228 
Elementary Statistics.) 

P 305 Experimental Methods 
in Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 301. Methods of 
designing and analyzing psycho- 
logical experiments. The scientific 
method as applied to psychology. 
Consideration of research tech- 
niques, experimental variables, 
design problems, data analysis. 
This course includes training in the 
use of a computer statistics pro- 
gram. 3 credit hours. 

P 306 Psychology Laboratory 

Prerequisite: P 305. Group and 
individual experiments to be car- 
ried out by students. Research 
techniques for studying learning, 
motivation, concept formation. 
Data analysis and report writing. 
Offered only in spring semester of 
odd-numbered years. 3 credit 
hours. 

P 3 1 5 Human and 
Animal Learning 

Prerequisite: P 111. Different types 
of human and animal learning. 
Learning as an adaptive mecha- 
nism. Psychological principles 
underlying learning. Practical 
applications of learning principles. 
3 credit hours. 

P 316 The Psychology of 
Health and Sport 

Prerequisite: P 111. The role of 
psychological factors in the cause 
and prevention of physical illness. 
The modification of unhealthful 



behaviors. The study of stress and 
the management of stress, particu- 
larly during athletic competition. 
The nature of pain and pain man- 
agement. The role of emotion in 
athletic performance. The use of 
psychology in athletic performance 
enhancement. Threats to the 
health of athletes. 3 credit hours. 

P 321 Social Psychology 
Prerequisites: Pill, SO 113. The 
interdependence of social organiza- 
tions and behavior. The interrela- 
tionships between role systems and 
personality; attitude analysis, 
development and modification; 
group interaction analysis; social 
conformity; social class and human 
behavior. Offered only in the 
spring semester of odd-numbered 
years. 3 credit hours. (Same course 
as SO 320). 

P 330 Introduction to 
Community Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 111. Key concepts 
of community psychology/com- 
munity mental health. Communi- 
ty problems, needs and resources. 
The helping relationship. Interven- 
tion techniques. Programming 
services. Understanding behavioral 
differences. Careers in community 
psychology. 3 credit hours. 



P 331-332 Undergraduate 
Practicum I and II in 
Community/Clinical Psychology 
Corequisites: P 330 or permission 
of instructor. Supervised field expe- 
rience in community psycholo- 
gy/mental health settings. Explo- 
ration of service delivery. Develop- 
ment of basic repertoire of helping 
skills. Behavioral log. Project 
reporting. Understanding helping 



roles at individual, small group and 
institutional levels. 1-6 credit hours 
with a maximum of 3 credit hours 
per semester. 

P 336 Abnormal Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 111. Psychological 
and organic factors in personality 
disorganization and deviant behav- 
ior. Psychodynamics and classifica- 
tions of abnormal behavior. Disor- 
ders of childhood, adolescence and 
old age. Evaluation of therapeutic 
methods. 3 credit hours. 

P 341 Psychological Theory 

Prerequisite: Pill. Contemporary 
theory in psychology. Emphasis on 
those theories which have most 
influenced thinking and research in 
sensation, perception, learning, 
motivation, personality. Offered 
only in fall semester of odd-num- 
bered years. 3 credit hours. 

P 350 Human Assessment 
Prerequisite: P 301. Basic principles 
of measurement, applied to prob- 
lems of the construction, adminis- 
tration and interpretation of stan- 
dardized tests in psychological, edu- 
cational and industrial settings. 
Offered only in fall semester of odd- 
numbered years. 3 credit hours. 

P 351 Behavior Therapies 

Prerequisite: P 111. Principles of 
therapeutic behavior management. 
Alteration of maladaptive behavior 
patterns in institutional, neighbor- 
hood, home, educational and social 
settings by operant and respondent 
reinforcement techniques. Habit 
management in oneself and one's 
children. Offered only in the 
spring semester of even-numbered 
years. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 226 



P 361 Behavioral Neuroscience 

Prerequisites: P 111; BI 121 and BI 
122. Endocrinological, neural, sen- 
sory and response mechanisms 
involved in learning, motivation, 
adjustment, emotion and sensation. 
Offered only in spring semester of 
even-numbered years. 3 credit hours. 

P 370 Psychology of Personality 

Prerequisites: P 1 1 1, junior class sta- 
tus. Theory and method in the 
understanding of normal and 
deviant aspects of personality; theo- 
ries of Freud, Jung, Rogers, neo- 
Freudians and others. 3 credit hours. 

P 375 Foundations of 
Clinical/Counseling Psychology 

Prerequisite: P 336. Foundations of 
clinical/counseling psychology will 
review the humanistic, psychoana- 
lytic, and behaviorist views on the 
emergence and treatment of psy- 
chopathology. The fit between the- 
ory and technique will be explored. 
3 credit hours. 

P 480-484 Special Topics 
in Psychology 

Selected topics of special or current 
interest. 3 credit hours. 

P 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of faculty 
member and department chair. 
Opportunity for the student under 
the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of personal inter- 
est. This course must be initiated 
by the student after conferring 
with the faculty member who has 
agreed to supervise the project. 1-3 
credit hours. 



PUBLIC 
MANAGEMENT 



PA 101 Introduction to 
Public Administration 

The nature of and problems involved 
in the administradon of public serv- 
ices at the federal, state, regional and 
local levels. 3 credit hours. 

PA 302 Public Administration 
Systems and Procedures 

The major staff management func- 
tions in government and in non- 
profit agencies: planning, budget- 
ing, scheduling and work analysis. 
3 credit hours. 

PA 305 Institutional Budgeting 
and Planning 

Budgeting as an institutional plan- 
ning tool, as a cost control device 
and as a program analysis mecha- 
nism is stressed. Attention is given 
to the salary expense budget, the 
revenue budget, the capital budget 
and the cash budget. 3 credit 
hours. 

PA 307 Urban and Regional 
Management 

Methods and analysis of decision 
making related to urban and 
regional problems. Topics include 
housing, land use, economic devel- 
opment, transportation, pollution, 
conservation and urban renewal. 3 
credit hours. 

PA 308 Health Care 
Delivery Systems 

An examination of the health care 
delivery systems in the U.S., 
including contemporary, econom- 
ic, organizational, financing, man- 
power, cost and national health 
insurance issues. 3 credit hours. 



PA 404 Public Policy Analysis 

Using the public perspective, 
examines the nature of the public 
policy process from policy forma- 
tion through policy termination. 
Major emphasis on the techniques 
commonly used in analyzing pub- 
lic policy including cost/benefit 
analysis and comparison of expect- 
ed and actual outcomes. An oppor- 
tunity to gain "hands on" experi- 
ence in the analysis and evaluation 
of public policy. 3 credit hours. 

PA 405 Public 
Personnel Practices 

Study of the civil service systems of 
the federal, state and local govern- 
ments including a systematic 
review of the methods of recruit- 
ment, evaluation, promotion, dis- 
cipline, control and removal. 
3 credit hours. 

PA 408 Collective Bargaining 
in the Public Sector 

Analysis of collective bargaining in 
the public sector, with emphasis on 
legislation pertaining to govern- 
ment employees. 3 credit hours. 

PA 450-455 Special Topics 

Selected topics of special or current 
interest in the field of public man- 
agement. 3 credit hours. 

PA 490 Public Health 
Administration 

An examination of public health 
activities, including public health 
organization, environmental health, 
disease control, use of information 
systems and social services. 3 credit 
hours. 

PA 512 Seminar in 
Public Administration 

Selected topics related to public 



I 



227 



administration are chosen for study 
in depth. 3 credit hours. 

PA 598 Public 
Administration Internship 

Prerequisite: consent of the coordi- 
nator. Monitorial field experience 
with public and not-for-profit agen- 
cies. Minimum of 3 credit hours. 

PA 599 Independent Study 

Independent study on a project of 
interest to the student under the 
direction of a faculty member 
approved by the department chair. 
3 credit hours. 



PRIVATE CLUB 
MANAGEMENT 



PCM 220 Introduction to the 
Private Club Industry 

Prerequisite: HR 165. As an 
introduction to the unique 
aspects, rules, regulations and sys- 
tems in the private club industry, 
this general survey course covers 
city clubs, country clubs, golf 
clubs, yacht clubs and other types 
of private club operations. Other 
principal facets of club manage- 
ment prevalent in the industry 
today will be explored. 3 credit 
hours. 

PCM 250 Lodging Operations 
for the Private Club Industry 

With the prevalence of lodging 
operations at private clubs — both 
in the city and at more suburban 
locations — the need to under- 
stand lodging unique to the club 
environment is paramount to 
becoming competitive in the 
industry. Topics reviewed include 
housekeeping, security, revenues 
and room rates, maintenance and 



facilities, reservations and sales 
marketing, all set within the 
unique context of a membership- 
based organization. This course 
includes a mandatory trip to visit 
a variety of city clubs in nearby 
New York City as well as the 
opportunity to explore unique 
local club experiences. 3 credit 
hours. 

PCM 280 Legal Aspects of 
Hospitality, Tourism and Clubs 

An overview of specific issues and 
liabilities that the professional, pri- 
vate club manager will face is pre- 
sented. Classic and current case 
studies and issues will be presented 
to the student, including laws that 
affect personal and financial 
advancement. 3 credit hours. 

PCM 322 Marketing for 
Tourism, Hospitality and Private 
Clubs 

Development of general marketing 
skills within the context of the pri- 
vate club industry. As the changing 
face oi clubs present more competi- 
tive forces, club managers need to 
better understand the marketing 
opportunites facing them and how 
best to com.pete in that evolving 
environment. The ability to com- 
municate with members and outside 
constituencies is reviewed in detail, 
giving consideration to newsletters, 
web-based or enhanced communi- 
cations, and other media for inter- 
acting with members, employees, 
and the external community. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

PCM 330 Private Club 
Renovation and Property 
Management 

Propert}' and facilities management 



is crucial to the success of private 
clubs and recreational facilities. 
Analysis of various components 
consisting of energy usage and 
environmental impacts on the club 
industry will be presented. Includ- 
ed in the analysis will be how a 
manager creates and implements 
systematic control procedures for 
private clubs and recreational facil- 
ity properties. 3 credit hours. 

PCM 345 Catering, Meetings 
and Event Planning for the 
Private Club Industry 

Due to the specific nature of spe- 
cial events that are unique to pri- 
vate clubs, this course will review a 
variety of concepts germane to 
catering and event management 
within the context of private clubs. 
Topics include marital customs and 
wedding planning, color coordina- 
tion and decorations, themed 
events, outside services, audio-visu- 
al and other special effects, on and 
off-premise catering and function 
sales, staffing, computer applica- 
tions in banquet management, and 
general event planning. 3 credit 
hours. 



PCM 380 Recreation and Fitness 
Facilities Management for Private 
Clubs 

This course provides a basic under- 
standing of sport and recreation 
activities found at many private 
clubs. While the chief operating 
officer concept espoused by the 
CMAA requires a general under- 
standing of the many facets of a 
club, a thorough understanding of 
unique recreation facilities is 
mandator)' — not all clubs have golf 
and tennis or pools. Yet a diverse 



Courses 228 



mix of hunt clubs, health facilities, 
and even bowling alleys permeate 
the landscape. By understanding the 
basic principles inherent in each 
aspect of recreation, students will 
acquire a commanding grasp of the 
various tenets important to success. 
The course will also consider retail 
applications that are related to pri- 
vate clubs. 3 credit hours. 

PCM 385 Environmental 
Resources and Conservation for 
Club and Recreation Managers 

An introduction to the myriad of 
environmental, legal, and ecologi- 
cal aspects pertinent to clubs and 
spa/resort properties. In addition 
to the introduction to OSHA stan- 
dards, concepts to be explored 
include landscape architecture and 
maintenance; water, chemical use 
and conservation; land use policies; 
turf grass management including 
soil and seeding applications; hor- 
ticulture and other self-generated 
planting opportunities; pesticide 
and biological control methods; 
and management of resources in an 
ecologically positive fashion within 
the constraints of organizational 
objectives. 3 credit hours. 

PCM 410 Taxes, Public Policy 
and Advanced Fiscal Management 
for the Club Industry 

Prerequisites: HR 321, PCM 220, 
PCM 280. An examination of the 
burgeoning tax, financial planning 
and administrative requirements for 
the advanced club manager. Con- 
cepts include IRS audits and tax 
issues; zoning and other regional or 
local aspects of governmental agen- 
cies; and the unique influences 
above and beyond the general intro- 
duction of liquor liability, social 



responsibility, and charitable partici- 
pation so profound in the private 
club industry. The course expands 
on the financial tools covered in ear- 
lier classes, with particular focus on 
cash flow analysis, lease/purchase 
financing, managerial economics, 
and other fiscal and economic rela- 
tionships with internal constituen- 
cies and external financial/regulatory 
agencies. In addition to taxes, 
finance and managerial economics, 
there are also segments on the 
National Club Association and leg- 
islative relations/lobbying and other 
policy topics. 3 credit hours. 

PCM 415 Management of 
Real Estate, Construction and 
Renovation for the Club Industry 

Because of the unique nature of 
club facilities and membership pri- 
orities, maintenance of high quali- 
ty facilities is a paramount concern 
to the modern club manager. This 
course instills a general knowledge 
of facilities and equipment pur- 
chasing, construction and renova- 
tion planning with particular focus 
on the frequently aging condition 
of club facilities and equipment. 
Additional topics include real 
estate rules and regulations, financ- 
ing, capital budgeting and other 
aspects of undertaking significant 
renovation or construction projects 
in the club industry. The course 
will also review the concepts inher- 
ent in developer-owned course 
construction and subsequent con- 
version to a private, member-run 
club. 3 credit hours. 

PCM 501 Leadership Applications 
in Hospitality, Tourism and 
Private Clubs 

This capstone course in club man- 



agement is designed to incorporate 
many of the contemporary topics 
affecting club managers. It will 
focus on strategic planning, 
board/member relationships, ad- 
vanced human resource and legal 
issues, current topics in food and 
beverage, and other operational 
issues. The course will also incor- 
porate the advanced premier club 
service program of the national 
Club Managers Association and a 
significant component of contem- 
porary topics. 3 credit hours. 

PCM 510 Internship in the 
Private Club Industry 

Prerequisite: completion of the 600 
hours of and consent of internship 
coordinator. Interns are required to 
complete 400 hours of experience 
focused on supervisor responsibili- 
ties at a private club that has been 
approved and recognized by the 
department. The experience will be 
monitored by an intern supervisor; 
and to help ensure the student's suc- 
cess, cooperative efforts will be 
undertaken with the club manager, 
the department chair, the intern 
supervisor, faculty members and the 
student. The internship will be aug- 
mented by additional readings, spe- 
cial projects, journals and other 
assignments deemed appropriate for 
each individual situation. A final 
paper and/or oral presentation deliv- 
ered to the introductory club class 
will be required at the completion of 
the internship. 3 credit hours. 



PHYSICS 

PH 100 Introductory Physics 
with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: M 109/M 127 or 



229 



equivalent math competency. A 
one-semester introduction to the 
science of physics primarily for 
liberal arts, business and hospitali- 
ty/tourism students. The course 
provides a broad, algebra-based 
understanding of the basic laws of 
nature, their application to our 
everyday lives and their impact on 
our technological society. Labora- 
tory fee; 4 credit hours. 

PH 101 Energy-Present 
and Future 

Prerequisite: M 109/M 127 or 
equivalent math competency. 
Intended primarily for business 
and liberal arts students. Explores 
the nature, role and economic 
impact of energy in our society. 
Topics include: the nature and 
growth of energy consumption, 
physical limits to energy produc- 
tion and consumption, environ- 
mental effects and comparisons of 
energy alternatives. Special empha- 
sis on the technical, environmental 
and economic aspects of nuclear 
power as well as energy sources of 
the future such as fast breeder reac- 
tors, fusion, solar and geothermal 
power. 3 credit hours. 

PH 103-104 General Physics 
I and II with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: M 109/M 127 or 
equivalent math competency. Pri- 
marily for life science majors with 
no calculus background. Basic con- 
cepts of classical physics: funda- 
mental laws of mechanics, heat, 
electromagnerism, optics, and con- 
servation principles. Introduction 
to modern physics: relativity and 
quantum theory, atomic, nuclear 
and solid-state physics. Application 
of the physical principles to life sci- 



ences. Laboratory fee; 4 credit 
hours per term. 

PH 150 Mechanics, Heat and 
Waves with Laboratory 

Prerequisite: M 117. Introductory 
course for physical science and engi- 
neering majors. Kinematics, New- 
ton's laws, conservation principles 
for momentum, energy and angular 
momentum. Thermal physics. Basic 
properties of waves, simple harmon- 
ic motion, superposition principle, 
interference phenomena and sound. 
Laboratory fee; 4 credit hours. 



PH 203 The Physics of Music 
and Sound with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: PH 100, PH 103, 
PH 150 or equivalent. A second 
semester course in physics for stu- 
dents with music and sound 
recording majors and others with a 
special interest in music, acoustics, 
or sound and hearing. Study of the 
physics underlying such things as 
the production of sound by musi- 
cal instruments, electromagnetic 
storage and reproduction of sound, 
human hearing, and acoustics of 
concert halls and other spaces. 
Integrated laboratory experiments 
provide hands-on experience of 
these phenomena. Laboratory fee; 
4 credit hours. 

PH 205 Electromagnetism and 
Optics with Laboratory 

Prerequisites: PH 1 50, M 1 1 8. Basic 
concepts of electricit)' and magnet- 
ism; Coulomb's law, electric field 
and potential. Gauss's law, Ohm's 
law, Kirchoff's rules, capacitance, 
magnetic field. Ampere's law, Fara- 
day's law of induction. Maxwell's 
equations, electromagnetic waves. 



Fundamentals of optics; light, laws 
of reflection and refraction, interfer- 
ence and diffraction phenomena, 
polarization, gratings, lenses and 
optical instruments. Laboratory fee; 
4 credit hours. 

PH 207 Engineering Physics 
Prerequisites: One full year of non- 
calculus physics with laboratories, 
two semesters of calculus. A one- 
semester course primarily for engi- 
neering transfer students who had 
one-year non-calculus physics 
sequence in two-year colleges and 
technical schools. All the major 
topics of PH 150-PH 205 are cov- 
ered with an ample use of calculus. 
PH 207 should not be used as a 
technical elective. 4 credit hours. 

PH211 Modern Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 205. Modern 
physics fundamentals. Twentieth 
century developments in the theo- 
ry of relativity and the quantum 
theory. Atomic, nuclear, solid-state 
and elementary particle physics. 
3 credit hours. 

PH 270 Thermal Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 103 or PH 150. 
Basic thermodynamics and its appli- 
cations. Major emphasis on the effi- 
ciency of energy conversion and uti- 
lization. Topics include: the laws of 
thermodynamics, entropy, efficiency 
of heat engines, solar energy, the 
energy balance of the earth, energy 
systems of the future, economics of 
energy use. 3 credit hours. 

PH 280 Lasers 

Prerequisite: PH 205. Laser theory, 
holography, construction and 
application to latest engineering 
and scientific uses. 3 credit hours. 



Courses 230 



PH 285 Modern Optics 

Prerequisite: PH 205. Introduction 
to optical theories. Topics on the 
latest developments in optics. 
Application to life sciences and 
engineering. 3 credit hours. 

PH 301 Analytical Mechanics 

Prerequisite: PH 150, M 204, or 
instructor's consent. This is an 
intermediate-level course in New- 
tonian mechanics. Selected topics 
include the formulation of the cen- 
tral force problem and its applica- 
tion to planetary motion and to 
scattering, theory of small oscilla- 
tions, dynamics of rigid body 
motion, and an introduction to 
Lagrangian and Hamiltonian for- 
malism. 3 credit hours. 
PH 303 Radioactivity and 
Radiation 

Intended for students in occupa- 
tional safety and health, fire sci- 
ence, forensic science and related 
fields as well as for science and 
engineering students with interest 
in this area. Topics include: the 
nature of radiation and radioac- 
tivity, the interaction of radiation 
with matter, biological effects of 
radiation, detection and measure- 
ment of radiation, shielding con- 
siderations, dosimetry and stan- 
dards for personal protection. 
3 credit hours. 

PH 401 Atomic Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 211. Structure and 
interactions of atomic systems 
including Schrodinger's equation, 
atomic bonding, scattering and 
mean free path, radiative transitions 
and laser theory. 3 credit hours. 

PH 406 Solid-State Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 211. Introduction 



to the physics of solids with 
emphasis on crystal structure, lat- 
tice vibrations, band theory, semi- 
conductor, magnetism and super- 
conductivity. Applications to semi- 
conductor devices and metallurgy. 
3 credit hours. 

PH 415 Nuclear Physics 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or consent of 
instructor. Elementary nuclear 
physics. Nuclear structure, natural 
radioactivity, induced radioactivity, 
nuclear forces and reactions, fission 
and fusion, reactors and topics of 
special interest. 3 credit hours. 

PH 450 Special Topics in Physics 

Study of selected topics of special 
or current interest. 3 credit hours. 

PH 45 1 Elementary Quantum 
Mechanics 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or consent of 
instructor. An elementary treat- 
ment of nonrelativistic quantum 
mechanics. Schrodinger's equation 
with its applications to atomic and 
nuclear structure; collision theory; 
radiation; introductory perturba- 
tion theory. 3 credit hours. 

PH 470 Theory of Relativity 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or consent of 
instructor. Introduction to Ein- 
stein's theory of relativity. Special 
theory of relativity; Lorentz trans- 
formations, relativistic mechanics 
and electromagnetism. General 
theory of relativity; equivalence 
principle, Einstein's three tests, 
graviton, black hole and cosmolo- 
gy. 3 credit hours. 

PH 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of faculty 
member and department chair. 



Opportunity for the student under 
the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of personal inter- 
est. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 1-3 credit hours. 

PHILOSOPHY 



PL 201 Philosophical Methods 

The nature of reality and how it 
may be known, according to the 
great thinkers of the Occident 
and the Orient. 3 credit hours. 

PL 205 Classical Philosophy 

The origins of philosophy and the 
continuing influence of classical 
thought on the development of 
ideas. 3 credit hours. 

PL 206 Modern Philosophy: 
Descartes to the Present 

Philosophical theories that have 
dominated the modern age. Stress 
on a central figure of the period. 
3 credit hours. 

PL 210 Logic 

Modern symbolic logic and its 
applications. 3 credit hours. 



PL 215 Nature of the Self 

Investigation of personal identity, 
human nature and the mind from 
ancient, modern. Western and East- 
ern perspectives. 3 credit hours. 

PL 222 Ethics 

How shall one live? Critical exami- 
nation of answers proposed by clas- 
sic and modern philosophers of the 
major world traditions. 3 credit 
hours. 



231 



PL 223 Ethics and Business 

How ethics and other values func- 
tion in their relation to business 
enterprise. 3 credit hours. 

PL 240 Philosophy of Science 
and Technology 

Scientific method, the logic of sci- 
entific explanation, the application 
of science to practical problems 
and questions peculiar to the social 
sciences. 3 credit hours. 

PL 250 Philosophy of Religion 

An examination of some philo- 
sophical notions used in religious 
discourse, such as meaning, truth, 
faith, being, God, the holy. 3 cred- 
it hours. 

PL 256 Analysis and 
Criticism of the Arts 

The language used to talk about 
works of art: form, content, expres- 
sion, value and the ontological status 
of the art object. 3 credit hours. 

PL 416 Computer Ethics 

Prerequisite: junior or senior stand- 
ing. A critical examination of ethical 
theories and their application to the 
uses of computers and information 
technology. Issues include profes- 
sional ethics, privacy, responsibility, 
access, property rights, computer 
crime and social implications. (See 
also CS 416.) 1 credit hour. 

PL 450 Special Topics in 
Philosophy 

Study of selected topics of special 
or current interest. 3 credit hours. 

PL 599 Independent Study 

Opportunity for the student under 
the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest. This 



course must be initiated by the stu- 
dent. 1-3 credit hours. 



POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 



(t) indicates Institute of Law and 
Public Affairs courses. 

PS 101 Introduction to Politics 

A basic course introducing stu- 
dents to the discipline of political 
science and its subjects: political 
theory, law, national government, 
international relations, compara- 
tive government and political econ- 
omy. 3 credit hours. 

PS 121 American Government 
and Politics 

A basic study of the American 
political system. Constitutional 
foundations, the political culture. 
Congress, the Presidency, the judi- 
cial system, political parties, inter- 
est groups, news media, individual 
liberties, federalism, the policy- 
making process. 3 credit hours. 

PS 122 State and Local 
Government and Politics 

Problems of cities, revenue sharing, 
community power structures, wel- 
fare, public safety, the state political 
party, big-city political machines, 
interest groups, state legislatures, the 
governor, the mayor, courts and 
judicial reform. 3 credit hours. 

PS 203 American 
Political Thought 

Pre-Revolutionary and Revolu- 
tionary political thought; classical 
conservatism, liberalism, Jacksonian 
democracy, civil disobedience, social 
Darwinism, progressive individual- 



ism and pluralism. 3 credit hours. 

PS 205 The Politics of the 
Black Movement in America 

The political development of the 
Black Movement in America 
emphasizing ideological, legal and 
cultural perspectives. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 216 Urban Government 
and Politics 

A study of the urban political 
process. Structures and organiza- 
tions of urban governments, deci- 
sion making, public policy, the 
"urban crisis," crime and law 
enforcement, party politics and 
elections, taxation and spending 
patterns, environmental problems, 
management of urban develop- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

PS 222 United States 
Foreign Policy 

An examination of the global foreign 
policy of the United States and of 
the process of polic)' making involv- 
ing governmental and non-govern- 
mental actors. A review of the polit- 
ical, economic, military and cultural 
tracks of policy. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 224 Public Attitudes 
and Public Policy 
A study of the sources of mass 
political attitudes and behavior and 
their effect upon public policy. The 
course will examine the techniques 
for influencing opinion including 
propaganda and mass media com- 
munications. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 228 Public Interest Groups 

Examination ol American group 
institutions of the American politi- 
cal culture. Emphasis on the legal 



Courses 232 



nature, purpose and function of 
each operational organization in 
the political process. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 229 Legal Communications 

Familiarization with the kinds of 
legal documents and written 
instruments employed by partici- 
pants in the legal process. Recog- 
nization and understanding of the 
purpose of writs, complaints, 
briefs, memoranda, contracts, wills 
and motions. 3 credit hours. 

tPS 230 Anglo-American 
Jurisprudence 

Surveys ideas about the nature of 
law. Legal philosophers examined 
include: Plato, Aristotle, St. 
Thomas Aquinas, John Austin, 
William Blackstone, Benjamin 
Cardozo, L.A. Hart and Oliver 
Wendell Holmes. The contribution 
to legal theory made by various 
schools of jurisprudence (e.g., posi- 
tivism, legal realism). 3 credit hours. 

tPS 231 Judicial Behavior 

Examination of the American 
court system as a political policy- 
making body. Topics considered 
include: the structure of the judi- 
cial system, the influence of socio- 
logical and psychological factors on 
judicial behavior, and the nature 
and impact of the judicial decision- 
making process. 3 credit hours. 

PS 232 The Politics of the First 
Amendment 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Examination 
of the political implications of the 
First Amendment freedoms of 
speech, press and religion; Supreme 
Court adaptation of the First 
Amendment to changing political 
social conditions. 3 credit hours. 



PS 241 International Relations 

Forces and structures operating in 
the modern nation-state system, 
the foreign policy process, deci- 
sion-making process, the impact of 
decolonization on traditional inter- 
state behavior, economic and polit- 
ical developments since World War 
11. 3 credit hours. 

PS 243 International Law 
and Organization 

Prerequisite: PS 241. Traditional 
and modern approach to interna- 
tional law and organization; major 
emphasis on the contribution of 
law and organization to the estab- 
lishment of a world of law and 
world peace. The League of 
Nations system and the United 
Nations system are analyzed. 
3 credit hours. 



PS 261 Modern Political Analysis 

Introduction to political analysis 
including quantitative and qualita- 
tive techniques, systems and data 
analyses, role and group theory, 
simulations and projections using 
computerized models. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 281 Comparative Political 
Systems: Asia 

Traditional and modern political 
and social structures of China, 
Japan and Korea and other Asian 
states including the flinction of the 
political system within each coun- 
try. 3 credit hours. 

PS 282 Comparative Political 
Systems: Europe 

Political characteristics of modern 
European states. Emphasis on 
political, social and economic insti- 
tutions and structures. Special 



attention to European integration 
and the European Union; changes 
in Eastern Europe and the former 
USSR. 3 credit hours. 

PS 283 Comparative Political 
Systems: Latin America 

Political modernization, develop- 
ment in Latin America, political 
institutions, national identity, lead- 
ership, integration, political social- 
ization and political ideologies. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 285 Comparative Political 
Systems: Middle East 

Analysis of the Arab and non-Arab 
states in the region with particular 
attention to the political systems, 
violence, and the problems of tradi- 
tion vs. modernity. 3 credit hours. 

PS 304 Political Parties 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Voting and 
electoral behavior, nominations 
and campaign strategy, pressure 
groups, political party structure 
and functions of the party system 
in the American political commu- 
nity. 3 credit hours. 

PS 308 Legislative Process 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Legislative 
process in the American political 
system; legislative functions; selec- 
tion and recruitment of candidates; 
legislative leadership, the commit- 
tee system; lobbyists, decision- 
making; legislative norms, folkways 
and legislative executive relations. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 309 The American Presidency 

The role of the President as com- 
mander-in-chief, legislative leader, 
party leader, administrator, manager 
of the economy, director of foreign 
policy and advocate of social justice; 



233 



nature of presidential decision mak- 
ing, authority, power, influence and 
personality. 3 credit hours. 

PS 331 Theory and 
the Supreme Court 

An examination of the ways in 
which the Supreme Court exercises 
judicial review with particular 
emphasis on the various theories of 
review as they have evolved from 
John Marshall to the present. 3 
credit hours. 

PS 332 Constitutional Law 

Prerequisite: PS 121. Principles 
and concepts of the United States 
Constitution as revealed in leading 
decisions of the Supreme Court 
and the process of judicial review. 
3 credit hours. 

tPS 340 Campaign Management: 
Procedures and Operations 

A study of the procedures and 
operation of the contemporary 
political campaign including issue 
development, voter registration, 
canvassing, media usage, fundrais- 
ing, scheduling, campaign data, 
etc. 3 credit hours. 

fPS 341 Campaign Management: 
Structure and Organization 

Exploration of the structure, organi- 
zation and management of the cam- 
paign operation and the handling, 
roles and tasks of the campaign per- 
sonnel. 3 credit hours. 

fPS 344 Campaign Management: 
Survey Research, Polling 
and Computers 

A study of the uses and interpreta- 
tion of survey research, polling 
projects, computer techniques, and 
their application to political cam- 
paigns. 3 credit hours. 



fPS 346 Campaign Management: 
Financing and Election Laws 

Exploration of the methods used 
to finance a political campaign; 
the nature of campaign costs; the 
role of political action commit- 
tees; the effects of campaign 
finance laws; and the technical 
aspects and political implications 
of election laws at the federal, 
state and local levels. 3 credit 
hours. 

PS 350 Public Policy: 
U.S. National Security 
The development and operation of 
U.S. military and national security 
policy from George Washington to 
the present with the major empha- 
sis on the 20th century and post- 
World War II 3 credit hours. 
PS 355 Terrorism 
Examination of the modern appli- 
cation of terrorism in international 
affairs paying special attention to 
the ideological and infrastructure 
determinants. 3 credit hours. 

PS 390 Political Modernization 

Comparative analysis of political 
change and development. Political 
transition, political integration and 
nation building; institutional 
developments; political parties; 
military elites; youth; intellectuals; 
the bureaucracy; economic devel- 
opment; and political culture. 
3 credit hours. 

tPS 415 Internship in Legal 
and Public Affairs 

Students will have the opportunity 
to work as paraprofessionals in leg- 
islatures, government agencies, and 
party organizations, and to share 
their experiences with other interns 
in legal and public affairs. Permis 



sion of the instructor is required. 
3 credit hours. 

tPS 450 Campaign 
Management: Internship 

Actual work experience in cam- 
paign management. 3 credit hours. 

PS 461 Political Theory: 
Ancient and Medieval 

Foundations of Western political 
thought from the Greek, Roman 
and medieval experiences as it 
applies to the total discipline of 
political science. 3 credit hours. 

PS 462 Political Theory: 
Modern and Contemporary 

A continuation of the study of 
political thought from the High 
Middle Ages to the contemporary 
theorists. 3 credit hours. 
PS 494-498 Special Topics 
in Political Science 
Special studies on a variety of cur- 
rent problems and specialized areas 
in the field not available in the reg- 
ular curriculum. 3 credit hours per 
course. 

PS 499-500 Senior Seminar 
in Political Science I and II 

Prerequisite: permission of depart- 
ment chair. Capstone course in 
which students use the tools of 
their discipline to examine a select- 
ed problem. May be conducted as a 
pro-seminar. Required of all politi- 
cal science majors. 3 credit hours 
per term. 

PS 599 Independent Study 

Directed research on special topics to 
be selected in consultation with the 
department chair and a sponsoring 
faculrv member. 3 credit hour 



Courses 234 



QUANTITATIVE 
ANALYSIS 



QA 118 Business Mathematics 

Prerequisites: M109/M127 or suc- 
cessful completion of qualifying 
placement test by mathematics 
department. An introduction to 
mathematical programming and 
probability and statistics. Topics 
include solutions to linear equa- 
tions, break-even analysis, graphi- 
cal solutions to linear program- 
ming problems, mathematical 
modeling, measures of central ten- 
dency and variability, and basic 
probability concepts. The course 
presents introductory material to 
QA 216. 3 credit hours. 

QA 216 Probability and Statistics 

Prerequisite: QA 1 1 8 or equivalent. 
A course in elementary probability 
and statistical concepts with 
emphasis on data analysis and pres- 
entation; frequency distributions; 
probability theory; probability dis- 
tributions; sampling distributions; 
statistical inference; hypothesis 
testing. 3 credit hours. 

QA 217 Advanced Statistics 

Prerequisite: QA 216. A course in 
advanced statistical methods for 
business. Topics include the analy- 
sis of variance, multiple regression, 
an introduction to the econometric 
model, times series analysis, chi- 
square and other nonparametric 
measures, and an introduction to 
robust estimation. Students will be 
required to use personal computers 
to apply the various statistical tech- 
niques covered in the course. 3 
credit hours. 



QA 328 Quantitative 
Techniques in Management 

Prerequisite: QA 217 and junior 
standing. An introduction to quan- 
titative techniques in management. 
Topics include linear program- 
ming, assignment problems, trans- 
portation algorithms, network and 
inventory models, and decision 
theory. 3 credit hours. 

QA 350 Quantitative Techniques 

Prerequisites: QA 217 and junior 
standing. Advanced applications of 
quantitative techniques to the solu- 
tion of business problems. Topics 
include: classical optimization 
techniques, non-linear program- 
ming, topics in mathematical pro- 
gramming, and graph theory. 
3 credit hours. 

QA 380 Operations Management 

Prerequisite: QA 217. Basic review 
of service and production systems 
designs and performance evaluation. 
Topics include: operations strategy, 
staff and production scheduling, 
Just-in-Time and time-based com- 
petition, project management, and 
the role of technology in service and 
manufacturing operations. 

QA 428 Forecasting for 
Decision Making 

Prerequisite: QA 217. Review of 
different approaches to forecasting 
used by management at different 
levels of decision making. Tech- 
niques will include smoothing and 
decomposition, causal and judg- 
mental methods. Computer appli- 
cations and modeling will be 
emphasized. 3 credit hours. 

QA 480 Project Management 

Prerequisite: QA 217. Survey of 
management techniques applicable 



to a wide variety of business-related 
project types. Emphasis on the 
project management cycle includ- 
ing selecting, scheduling, budget- 
ing and controlling projects. 
Desired qualifications and roles of 
project managers. Extensive use of 
project management software will 
be required. 3 credit hours. 

QA 598 Internship 

Prerequisite: QA 217. Supervised 
field experience for qualified stu- 
dents in an area related to opera- 
tions management or quantitative 
analysis. 3 credit hours. 

QA 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: QA 118, QA 216, 
QA 217 and junior standing. 
Independent research projects or 

other approved forms of independ- 
ent study. 3 credit hours. 

RUSSIAN 

RU 101-102 Elementary 
Russian I and II 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and 
reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation and the fundamental 
principles of grammar. 3 credit 
hours per term. 



RU 201-202 Intermediate 
Russian I and II 

Prerequisites: RU 101-102 or the 
equivalent. Stresses reading compre- 
hension of modern prose texts and a 
review of grammar necessary for this 
reading. Students are encouraged to 
read in their own areas of interest. 3 
credit hours per term. 



235 



SCIENCE 



Courses that are marked with an 
asterisk (*) are usually scheduled every 
other academic year. Courses marked 
with this symbol (f) are offered at the 
discretion of the department. 

tSC 111-112 Physical 
Science I and II 

The meaning of scientific concepts 
and terms and their relation to 
other areas of learning and to daily 
living. Development and unity of 
physical science as a field of knowl- 
edge. Includes astronomy, physics, 
chemistry and geology. 3 credit 
hours per term. 

*SC 126 Astronomy 

An introduction to present con- 
cepts concerning the nature and 
evolution of planets, stars, galaxies 
and other components of the uni- 
verse. The experimental and obser- 
vational bases for these concepts 
are examined. 3 credit hours. 

tSC 135 Earth Science 

A dynamic systems approach to 
phenomena of geology, oceanogra- 
phy and meteorology. Emphasis on 
interrelations of factors and 
processes and on importance of 
subject matter to human affairs. 
Suitable for non science as well as 
for science majors. 3 credit hours. 

OCCUPATIONAL 

SAFETY AND 

HEALTH 



SH 100 Safety Organization 
and Management 

History and development of the 
safety movement, nature and 
extent of the problem, develop- 



ment of worker's compensation, 
development of safety programs, 
cost analysis techniques, locating 
and defining accident sources, 
analysis of the human element, 
employee training, medical services 
and facilities, and the "what" and 
"how" of the Occupational Safety 
and Health Act. 3 credit hours. 

SH 110 Accident Conditions and 
Controls 

Prerequisite: SH 100. Mechanical 
hazards, machine and equipment 
guarding, boilers and pressure ves- 
sels, structural hazards, materials 
handling hazards and equipment 
use, electrical hazards, personal pro- 
tective equipment. 3 credit hours. 



SH 200 Elements of 
Industrial Hygiene 

Prerequisites: PH 103, SH 110, 
CH 103 or CH 115. Analysis of 
toxic substances and their effect on 
the human body. Analysis and 
effect of chemical hazards, physical 
hazards of electromagnetic and 
ionizing radiation, abnormal tem- 
peratures and pressure, noise, ultra- 
sonic and low-frequency vibration; 
sampling techniques including 
detector tubes, particulate sam- 
pling, noise measurement and radi- 
ation detection; governmental and 
industrial hygiene standards and 
codes. 3 credit hours. 

SH 210 Sound/Hearing/Noise 

Prerequisite: SH 200. Aii analysis 
of three major factors associated 
with the noise issue viz, the physics 
of sound, the biological phenome- 
non of hearing, and the engineer- 
ing processes of noise abatement 
including a review of the OSHA 
legal standards for noise exposure. 
3 credit hours. 



SH 400 Occupational Safety 
and Health Legal Standards 

Prerequisite: SH 100. All aspects of 
the legal constrains applicable to the 
occupational safet)' field. Includes 
OSHA, federal laws not under 
OSHA jurisdiction, selected state 
legislation, current and pending 
product liability laws, environmen- 
tal protection law and fire safety 
codes. Emphasizes particular legal 
areas as requested. 3 credit hours. 

SH401 Industrial 
Hygiene Measurements 

Prerequisite: SH 200. Current 
methods and techniques used in 
evaluating the occupational envi- 
ronment. Instruction on how to 
use the instruments necessary to 
measure ventilation, nonionizing 
radiation, airborne contaminants, 
noise and heat stress. Instruction 
on how to present data and prepare 
reports will also be included. 
3 credit hours. 

SH 500 Special Topics 

Selected study topics of special or 
current interest. 3 credit hours. 

SH 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of facult}' 
member and chair ol department. 
Opportunity for the student under 
the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest. This 
course must be initiated by the stu- 
dent. 1-3 credit hours. 



SOCIOLOGY 

SO 113 Sociology 
The role of culture in society, the 
person and personality; groups and 
group behavior; institutions; social 
interaction and social change. 3 
credit hours. 



Courses 236 



SO 114 Contemporary 
Social Problems 

Prerequisite: SO 1 13 or consent of 
instructor. The major problems 
which confront the present social 
order, and the methods now in 
practice or being considered for 
dealing with these problems. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 115 Women in Society 

An overview of women's role in the 
social system. Discussion includes 
myths and realities of sex differ- 
ences. Areas covered include analy- 
sis of the relationship of women to 
the economy, the arts, and the sci- 
ences and how these affect the 
behavior of women in the contem- 
porary world. 3 credit hours. 

SO 214 Deviance 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or consent of 
the instructor. (Offered in the 
spring semester only.) Centered 
around deviance as a social prod- 
uct. The problematic nature of the 
stigmatization process is explored 
in such areas as alcoholism, crime, 
mental illness and sexual behavior. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 218 The Community 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or consent of 
instructor. The community and its 
provisions for health, education, 
recreation, safety and welfare. Theo- 
retical concepts of community, plus 
ethnographic studies of small-scale 
human communities, introduce stu- 
dents to fundamental concepts of 
community. 3 credit hours. 

SO 220 Physical Anthropology 
and Archaeology 

An introduction to the study of 
human evolution and of present 



physical variations among 
humankind. Includes geologic time, 
primate evolution and early humans 
and their culture. 3 credit hours. 

SO 221 Cultural Anthropology 

A systematic study of the culture of 
preliterate and modern societies 
and of cultural change. Includes 
analyses of religion, economics, 
language, social and political 
organization and urbanization. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 231 Juvenile Delinquency 

Prerequisites: SO 113, P 111. This 
course is offered as CJ 221 in uni- 
versity schedules. VVn analysis of 
delinquent behavior in American 
society; examination of the theories 
and social correlates of delinquen- 
cy, and the sociolegal processes and 
apparatus for dealing with juvenile 
delinquency. 3 credit hours. (Same 
course as CJ 22 1 .) 

SO 250 Research Methods 

Prerequisite: sophomore status. The 
student develops the concepts neces- 
sary for selection and formulation of 
research problems in social science, 
research design and techniques, 
analysis and interpretation of 
research data. 3 credit hours. 
SO 310 Primary Group 
Interaction 

Prerequisite: SO 113. Exploration 
of communication in group 
process. Building a group and ana- 
lyzing group structure and interac- 
tion; the ways people communicate 
emotionally and intellectually. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 311 Criminology 

Prerequisites: P 111, SO 113. An 
introduction to the principles and 



concepts of criminology; analysis 
of the social context of criminal 
behavior, including a review of 
criminological theory, the nature 
and distribution of crime, the soci- 
ology of criminal law and the soci- 
etal reactions to crime and crimi- 
nals. 3 credit hours. (Same course 
asCJ311.) 

SO 312 Marriage and the Family 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or the con- 
sent of instructor. The formation, 
functioning and dissolution of rela- 
tionships in contemporary Ameri- 
can society is examined from an 
applied sociology perspective. 3 
credit hours. 

SO 313 Sociology of Sport 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or consent of 
instructor. A study of the relation- 
ships among sport, culture and 
society. Emphasis is on both ama- 
teur and professional sports and 
their impact on the larger social 
order. Course will examine sport 
from a comparative and historical 
perspective, but will also focus on 
problems confronting the world of 
sport in contemporary American 
society. 3 credit hours. 

SO 315 Social Change 

Prerequisite: SO 1 1 3 or consent of 
instructor. Sources, patterns and 
processes of social change with exam- 
ination of classical and modern theo- 
ries of major trends and develop- 
ments as well as studies of perspec- 
tives on microlevels of change in 
modern society. 3 credit hours. 

SO 320 Social Psychology 

Prerequisites: Pill, SO 113. This 
course is offered as P 321 in univer- 
sity schedules. The interdependence 



237 



of social organizations and behav- 
ior. The interrelationships between 
role systems and personality; atti- 
tude analysis, development and 
modification; group interaction 
analysis; social conformity; social 
class and human behavior. 3 credit 
hours. (Same course as P 321.) 

SO 321 Social Inequality 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or consent of 
instructor. Organization of social 
class: status, power and process of 
social mobility in contemporary 
society. Social stratification, its 
functions and dysfunctions, as it 
relates to the distribution of oppor- 
tunity, privilege and power in soci- 
ety. 3 credit hours. 



SO 331 Population and Ecology 

Prerequisite: SO 1 13 or permission 
of instructor. Societal implications 
of population changes and trends; 
impact of humans as social animals 
on natural resources, cultural val- 
ues and social structures; their 
influence on environmental ethics. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 333 Sociology of Aging 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or consent of 
instructor. The sociological phe- 
nomenon connected with aging in 
America. Discussion of the connec- 
tions between personal troubles 
and social issues encountered by 
members of this society as they age. 
An examination of age stratifica- 
tion and the resultant problems of 
ageism, prejudice and discrimina- 
tion. Systematic review of major 
theoretical framework and research 
studies; emphasis will be placed on 
the application of sociological the- 
ory and research in the field of 
aging. 3 credit hours. 



SO 337 Human Sexuality 
Prerequisite: SO 113 or consent of 
instructor. A scientific studv of 
human sexual behavioral patterns, 
social class attitudes and cultural 
myths. Topics include reproductive 
systems, sexual attitudes and 
behavioral patterns, abortion and 
sexual laws, and variations in sexu- 
al functioning. 3 credit hours. 

SO 340 Medical Sociology 
Prerequisite: SO 1 13 or consent of 
instructor. An analysis of a major 
social institution, the health care 
field. Emphasis placed on socio- 
cultural aspects of the field; general 
overview of the organization and 
delivery of health care services and 
the current problems and issues. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 350 Social Survey Research 

Prerequisite: P 301 or M 228. 
Introduction to the logic of social 
science by a survey research proj- 
ect. Emphasis on the use of com- 
puter software in analyzing large 
data sets. Topics include theory 
development, survey design, sam- 
pling, methods of data collection 
and statistical analysis of social sci- 
ence data. This course is part of the 
computer literacy component of 
the University Core Curriculum. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 390 Sociology of 
Organizations 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or consent of 
instructor. Classic sociological theo- 
ries of organization with emphasis 
on the concepts of bureaucracy, sci- 
entific management, human rela- 
tions and decision theory. The rele- 
vance of these ideas to concrete 
organization contexts, e.g., civil serv- 
ice, business, social movements and 



political parties, charitable institu- 
tions, hospitals. 3 credit hours. 

SO 400 Minority Group Relations 

Prerequisite: SO 1 13 or consent of 
instructor. An interdisciplinary 
analysis of minority groups with 
particular attention paid to those 
regional, religious and racial factors 
that influence interaction. 
Designed to promote an under- 
standing of subgroup culture. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 413 Social Theory 
Prerequisite: nine semester hours in 
sociology. An analysis of the devel- 
opment of sociology in the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries 
with particular emphasis on the 
theories of Comte, Durkheim, 
Simmel, Weber, Marx, deToc- 
queville and others. 3 credit hours. 

SO 418 Public Opinion 
and Social Pressure 

Prerequisites: SO 1 13, P 1 1 1. An 
intensive analysis of the nature and 
development of public opinion 
with particular consideration of the 
roles, both actual and potential, of 
communication and influence. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 440 Undergraduate Seminar 
Prerequisite: consent of depart- 
ment chair. A detailed examina- 
tion of selected topics in the field 
of sociology and a critical analysis 
of pertinent theories with empha- 
sis on modern social thought. 
3 credit hours. 

SO 441 Sociology of Death 
and Suicide 

Prerequisite: SO 1 13 or consent of 
instructor. A confrontation with 
individual mortalit)' and an aca- 



Courses 238 



demic investigation of such phe- 
nomena as funerals, terminal ill- 
ness and crisis intervention, among 
many others. 3 credit hours. 

SO 450 Research Seminar 

Prerequisite: P 301 or M 228. The 
student develops and carries out an 
original research project in social 
science, reporting this procedure to 
the class. 3 credit hours. 

SO 451-455 Special Topics in 
Sociology, Social Services, 
Anthropology 

Prerequisite: SO 113, SO 221, or 
permission of instructor. Special 
topics in sociology, anthropology, 
or social welfare on a variety of cur- 
rent problems and specialized areas 
not available in the regular curricu- 
lum. 3 credit hours. 

SO 501-502 Practicum I and II 

Prerequisite: consent of depart- 
ment chair. Field experience in 
sociology or anthropology. Semi- 
nars in conjunction with this expe- 
rience before off-campus field work 
is undertaken. Contact during the 
field work experience and guidance 
by the mentor provide an opportu- 
nity for understanding group and 
individual dynamics and their 
repercussions. Follow-up seminars 
and a paper are required. 1-6 cred- 
it hours. 

SO 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisites: consent of instructor 
and department chair. Opportuni- 
ty for the student, under the direc- 
tion of a faculty member, to 
explore an area of personal interest. 
This course must be initiated by 
the student. 1-3 credit hours. 



SPANISH 



SP 101-102 Elementary Spanish 
I and II 

Stresses pronunciation, aural and 
reading comprehension, basic con- 
versation and the fundamental 
principles of grammar. 3 credit 
hours per term. 

SP 201-202 Intermediate 
Spanish I and II 

Prerequisites: SP 101-102 or 
equivalent. Stresses the reading 
comprehension of modern prose 
texts and a review of grammar 
necessary for this reading. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to read in 
their own areas of interest. 3 cred- 
it hours per term. 

SOCIAL WELFARE 

SW 220 Introduction to 
Social Services 

Introduction to social services 
explores two basic questions from 
a historical perspective: Why are 
people poor, and, how have soci- 
eties responded to the conditions 
of poverty? Focus on how the dif- 
ferent economic, political, psy- 
chological and sociological 
arrangements of society and its 
social institutions create condi- 
tions which stimulate and necessi- 
tate differing social welfare 
responses. 3 credit hours. 
SW 340 Group Dynamics 
Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed for students who 
seek to develop their leadership 
skills in working with groups of 
various types. A cognitive and 
behavioral mastery of a range of 
complex variables for role effec- 
tiveness, including a working 



knowledge of personal, group and 
organizational dynamics, profes- 
sional skills of facilitation and val- 
ues of one's professional identity. 
3 credit hours. 

SW 40 1-402 Field 
Instruction I and II 

Supervised experience relevant to 
specific aspects of social services in 
human service agencies, institutions 
and organizations at the local, state 
and federal levels. Seminars to assist 
students with the integration of the- 
oretical knowledge and field tech- 
niques through lectures and class 
presentations. Students are required 
to spend eight hours a week in the 
field. 3 credit hours each. 

SW 415-416 Methods of 
Intervention I and II 

Basic social work theory in con- 
junction with practice skills to 
help students begin to develop 
professional techniques for inter- 
vention at both the macro and 
micro levels of practice. 3 credit 
hours each. 

SW 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: consent of the partic- 
ular faculty member. Designed to 
permit students to pursue specific 
areas of interest which may not be 
available in the curriculum. 1-3 
credit hours. 

THEATRE ARTS 

T 131 Introduction to the 
Theatre 

Play analysis from a literary stand- 
point and as it relates to special 
problems of the actor, director, 
designers and backstage personnel. 
Practical work in all phases within 
the classroom. Fall semester. 
3 credit hours. 



239 



T 132 Theatrical Style 

Study of dramatic genres and the- 
atrical conventions through script 
and critical reading, as well as prac- 
tical work in class. Spring semester. 
3 credit hours. 

T 241 Early World Drama 
and Theatre 

Dramatic literature in theatrical 
contexts from Classical Greece 
through Restoration England. 
3 credit hours. 

T 242 Modern World Drama 
and Theatre 

Dramatic literature in theatrical 
contexts from Realism through the 
nineteenth century to the present. 
Includes ethnic drama. 3 credit 
hours. 

T 341 Acting 

Developing of acting skills for the 
stage through games, improvisation 
and scene study. 3 credit hours. 

T 342 Play Directing 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
Fundamentals of directing, staging 
techniques, working with actors and 
direction of a one-act play for work- 
shop presentation. 3 credit hours. 



T 491-492 Production 
Practicum I and II 

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
Practicum in various areas of theatre: 
acting, directing, administration, 
technical theatre and design. Will be 
directly related to departmental pro- 
ductions. Each 3 credit hours. 

T 599 Independent Study 

Opportunity for the student under 
the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest. This 



course must be initiated by the stu- 
dent. 3 credit hours. 



TOURISM 
ADMINISTRATION 



TA 165 Introduction to Tourism 

All major elements of tourism will 
be examined including customer 
travel patterns, transportation sys- 
tems, major tourism suppliers and 
distribution systems. The role of the 
hospitality industry will be explored 
in relationship to domestic and for- 
eign tourism. 3 credit hours. 

TA 166 Touristic Geography I - 
The Western Hemisphere 

This course includes a study of 
travel patterns and destinations in 
the Western Hemisphere. Included 
are the major highlights of North 
America, Central America, the 
Caribbean, South America and the 
Antarctic. 3 credit hours. 



TA 167 Touristic Geography II - 
The Eastern Hemisphere 

In this second course in touristic 
geography, the emphasis is on the 
major destinations in the Eastern 
Hemisphere - the Middle East, 
South and East Asia, South Pacific, 
Pacific Islands and Africa. The 
study gives the student a well- 
founded knowledge of these 
unusual areas. 3 credit hours. 

TA 228 Human Resource 
Management for the Hospitality 
and Tourism Industry 

Prerequisite: TA 165. Provides the 
knowledge required to formulate 
and manage effectively the human 
resources in a hospitality and 



tourism related operation. Man- 
power analysis, organizational 
needs, job designs, recruitment 
process and other human resource 
topics are studied. 3 credit hours. 

TA 260 Transportation Systems I 
- Air, Rail and Vehicular 

As travelers journey to their desti- 
nations, whether national or inter- 
national, various means of trans- 
portation are essential. Studied are 
the global airline industry, the 
resurgence of worldwide rail servic- 
es, the international shipping 
industry, and the numerous modes 
of vehicular travel, from the auto- 
mobile to the motor coach and the 
phenomenal surge in sports utility 
vehicles. 3 credit hours. 

TA 261 Transportation Systems 
II - Shipping and Cruising 

Cruising the high seas has become 
one of the best methods of relax- 
ation for holiday travel. Innova- 
tions for the 21st Century include 
larger ships, now carrying almost 
3,000 passengers, with such on 
board amenities as ice skating 
rinks, incredibly furnished spas 
and exercise rooms, shopping 
"streets" with sidewalk cafes. Las 
Vegas shows and gambling casi- 
nos. An in-depth study of these 
floating resorts is conducted. 
3 credit hours. 

TA 275 Connecticut Tourism in 
the 21st Century 

How did Connecticut emerge as a 
viable tourism destination from its 
former connotation as a drive- 
through state? What now makes 
travelers stop to visit the state? 
How did Connecticut become a 
favorite weekend destination for 



Courses 240 



New Yorkers and Bostonians? 
How did one of their many inns 
gain the reputation as being "the 
finest in New England?" Included 
are visits to heritage sites, parks and 
the two casinos at Foxwoods and 
Mohegan Sun. 3 credit hours. 

TA 280 Legal Aspects of 
Hospitality, Tourism and Clubs 

One of the most intricate studies is 
that of tourism law. The ever- 
changing regulations not only 
impact the global traveler, but also 
the airlines, ships, railways, hotels, 
automotive services and motor 
coaches. Newcomers to the field 
are ecotourism and the environ- 
ment. This course studies the com- 
plexity of these interrelated indus- 
tries. 3 credit hours. 

TA 322 Marketing for Tourism, 
Hospitality and Private Clubs 

Prerequisite: TA 165. An analysis 
of the essential marketing princi- 
pals as currently applied in the hos- 
pitality and tourism industries. 
The hospitality marketing mix will 
be evaluated in terms of specific 
applications used in all three indus- 
try segments. 3 credit hours. 

TA 335 Convention and Meeting 
Planning 

As corporate meetings and conven- 
tions continue to increase in the 
world-wide tourism market, one of 
the newer and important career 
paths is that of professional meeting 
planner. Included in their sphere of 
responsibility is the meeting/organi- 
zation and agenda, site selection, 
meal planning, transportation, 
schedule of events, break-out ses- 
sions, leisure activities, finances and 
evaluation. 3 credit hours. 



TA 340 Tourism Planning and 
Policy 

A comprehensive review of the 
tourism planning and policy 
process used to develop or modify 
major tourism destinations. 
Aspects of the process include goals 
and objectives; the use of environ- 
mental, economical, marketing, 
topographical, and political stud- 
ies; and monitoring and control 
procedures to assure proper plan- 
ning and policy implementation. 
Focus on considering both tourism 
benefits and costs in assessing net 
impacts. 3 credit hours. 

TA 345 Tourism Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 133 or 134, or con- 
sent of instructor. An application of 
economic principals and research 
methods to tourist and tourism 
industry behavior. Practical research 
methods for assessing economic, 
social and environmental benefits 
and costs of tourism development 
are examined. 3 credit hours. 

TA 360 Corporate Travel 
Planning 

As airlines and hotels are funneling 
most of their energy, services and 
amenities toward the corporate 
traveler, bidding for a corporate 
account (RFP) and servicing it suc- 
cessfully is an exacting art. Every 
aspect of the industry is covered, 
including automation, cost-cutting 
strategies and professionalism. 
3 credit hours. 

TA 370 Tourism and the Gaming 
Industry 

This course provides an introduc- 
tion to the casino industry, and 
examines its phenomenal growth 
and relationship to tourism and 



community development. Focus is 
on the concepts and definitions 
essential for understanding the 
industry and on links of its history 
to current gaming practices. Partic- 
ular attention is paid to noted casi- 
nos in Monte Carlo, Las Vegas and 
Atlantic City as well as Connecti- 
cut's Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun. 
3 credit hours. 

TA 380 Resort Operations 

A comprehensive review of resort 
operations. Content covered 
includes the history and develop- 
ment of resorts, guest services and 
resort recreation functions. Stu- 
dents are expected to create innova- 
tive resort facilities and programs. 
Field trips to local resort properties 
may be required. 3 credit hours. 

TA 410 International Tourism 

Institutions which run the interna- 
tional tourism industry are reviewed. 
The relationship between these insti- 
tutions and various nations will be 
discussed. Participants will become 
familiar with the policy implications 
of operating in a multinational polit- 
ical, social and economic environ- 
ment. 3 credit hours. 

TA 420 The Impact of Tourism 
on the International System 

Tourism impacts the destination 
community and the tourist. Topics 
will cover the effect of tourism devel- 
opment on the destination environ- 
ment. This course assesses the inter- 
national response to the local effects 
of tourism. 3 credit hours. 

TA 430 Special Interest and 
Adventure Tourism 

This course investigates the 
extraordinary and ever-increasing 
field of special interest tourism. 



241 



This course will provide an 
overview of the niche that each 
aspect of special interest tourism 
contributes to the development of 
the tourism industry. Adventurous 
travel from dog sledding in Green- 
land to dugout canoes in the trop- 
ics; from ballooning in the French 
chateaux country and Masai Mara 
to heli-hiking and sightseeing in 
the Rockies. Included also is travel 
for the handicapped and the 
adventurer. 3 credit hours. 

TA 445 Cultural Heritage 
Tourism 

An in-depth examination of the 
concepts and issues relevant to the 
development of tourism based on 
cultural, historic and natural 
resources. Included is the contribu- 
tion of historic preservation, the 
arts and the humanities to tourism 
and the tourist, along with oppor- 
tunities for the growth of this seg- 
ment of the industry. Interacting 
with various cultures and the com- 
plexity of these interactions are dis- 
cussed. 3 credit hours. 

TA 450 Tourism Dimensions in 
Contemporary Society 

This course reviews the dynamics 
of the multifaceted tourism indus- 
try often described as a 17-part 
conglomerate. World-wide tourism 
is studied from historical, social, 
international, economic and envi- 
ronmental dimensions. Tourism's 
impact on the community and 
fundamental changes in the future 
of tourism are explored. 3 credit 
hours. 



TA 470 Tour Design, Marketing 
and Management 

Ihis course studies the design. 



operation and management of the 
escorted tour. Instruction covers 
the entire process for the tour oper- 
ator from initial contact to finished 
product. During the semester, each 
student plans a tour from begin- 
ning to end, designs and writes the 
brochure, prices the arrangements 
and shows how to successfully 
operate the finished product. 
3 credit hours. 

TA 480 Ecotourism 

This course draws together infor- 
mation on the rapidly evolving 
field of ecotourism. Examined are 
the effects of tourism on indige- 
nous wildlife and human cultures, 
natural resource management, and 
techniques for developing sustain- 
able tourism for future genera- 
tions. 3 credit hours. 

TA 490-494 Special Topics 

These courses provide additional 
detailed instruction for selected 
topics. Topics include, but are not 
limited to, the legal ramifications 
of tourism, tourist behavior, and 
sustainable development. 3 credit 
hours. 



TA 495-499 Advanced Special 
Topics 

Specialized courses in topics not 
previously covered. Subject matter 
may include, but is not limited to, 
advances in tourism research, tech- 
nology and tourism, and exo- 
tourism. 3 credit hours. 

TA 510 Internship 

Prerequisite: 600 hours of 
practicum and consent of the 
instructor. Interns are required to 
complete 600 hours field experi- 
ence in tourism or a related indus- 



try. The internship will emphasize 
supervisory responsibilities when- 
ever possible. Faculty, students and 
industry professionals will actively 
cooperate to help ensure the stu- 
dent's success with this experience. 
The internship will be augmented 
by selected management readings, 
written and oral reports, daily jour- 
nals, and faculty/professional 
industry management appraisals 
and conferences. 3 credit hours. 



TA 599 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
department coordinator. Indepen- 
dent research projects or other 
approved phases of independent 
study. 3 credit hours. 



242 

BOARD, ADMINISTRATION 

AND FACULTY 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Robert Alvine, Chair, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, 
i-Ten Management Corporation 

Sal A. Ardigliano, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, RM Services, Inc. 

Philip H. Bartels, J.D., Attorney, Holland, Kaufman & Battels, LLC 

David Beckerman, Chairman, Acorn Group 

Samuel S. Bergami, Jr., President, Alinabal Incorporated 

Nan Birdwhistell, Counsel, Murtha, Cullina, Richter & Pinney 

Carroll W. Brewster, former Executive Director, The Hole in the Wall Gang 

Anne Tyler Calabresi, Writer/Researcher - Anthropology 

Lawrence J. DeNardis, Ph.D., President, University of New Haven 

Orest T. Dubno, Chief Financial Officer, Lex Atlantic Corporation 

David R. Ebsworth, former President and General Manager of 
Bayer AG Business Group Pharmaceutical-Germany 

Murray A. Gerber, former President, Prototype and Plastic Mold Company, Inc. 

Jean M. Handley, Principal, Handley Consulting 

Lubbie Harper, Jr., Superior Court Judge, New Haven, Connecticut 

Terry M. Holcombe, former Vice-President for Development and 
Alumni Affairs, Yale University 

Henry C. Lee, Ph.D., Chief Emeritus of the Division of Scientific Services, 
State of Connecticut Department of Public Safety 

Mark S. Levy, President, Honeywell Fire Solutions Group 

Walter E. Luckett, Jr., Manager, Diversity, NA, Unilever 

Charles E. Pompea, Vice-Chair, President, Primary Steel, Inc. 

Laura J. Reid, President, The Fish Mart, Inc. 

M. Wallace Rubin, former Chairman, Wayside Furniture Shops, Inc. 

Francis A. Schneiders, former President, Enthone-OMI, Inc. 



243 

Ronald G. Shaw, President and Chief Executive Officer, Pilot Pen Corporation of America 

Daniel M. Smith, President, Daniel M. Smith & Associates 

Michael W. Toner, President, Electric Boat; Vice President, General Dynamics 

Reuben Vine, President, Railroad Salvage Stores 

Milton Wallack, D.D.S. 

EMERITUS BOARD 

Henry E. Bartels, former President, MMRM Industries, Subsidiary of Insilco Corporation 

James Q. Bensen, retired Connecticut Sales Manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

Roland M. Bixler, retired President and Co-Founder, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

Norman I. Botwinik, Botwinik Associates 

Isabella E. Dodds, Co-Chair, Friends of the UNH Library 

John E. Echlin, Jr., retired Account Executive, Paine Webber 

John A. Frey, Chairman of the Board, Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 

Robert M. Gordon, retired President, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 

Robert J. Lyons, Chairman of the Board, The Bilco Company 

Herbert H. Pearce, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, H. Pearce Company 

Fenmore R. Seton, retired President, Seton Name Plate Corporation 

R. C. Taylor, III, former President, Tay-Mac Corporation 

Robert F. Wilson, former Chairman of the Board, Wallace International Silversmiths, Inc. 

Representatives of the alumni/ae, full-time faculty and adjunct faculty serve two-year terms on the 
Board of Governors; representatives fom undergraduate student government organizations and 
the Graduate Student Council serve one-year terms on the Board of Governors. 

EMERITUS FACULTY 

Arnold, Joseph J., Professor Emeritus, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professor Emeritus, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., Cairo University; M.A.Sc, University of Toronto; Sc.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Brody, Robert R, Professor Emeritus, Marketing 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.B.A., University of Chicago; D.B.A., Harvard University 

Chandra, Satish, Professor Emeritus, Law and International Business 



Board, Administration & Faculty 244 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; 
L.L.B., Lucknow Law School, India; L.L.M., J.S.D., Yale University 

DeMayo, William S., Professor Emeritus, Accounting 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University; CPA 

Eikaas, Faith, Professor Emeritus, Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Ellis, Lynn W., Professor Emeritus, Management 

B.E.E., Cornell University; M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology; D.P.S., Pace University 

Fridshal, Donald, Professor Emeritus, Mathematics 

B.E.E., M.S., New York University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Gangler, Joseph M., Professor Emeritus, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., Columbia University 

George, Edward T., Professor Emeritus, Computer and Information Science 
B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D.Engr., Yale University 

Gere, William S., Jr., Professor Emeritus, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., M.S. I.E., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University 

Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor Emeritus, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S.E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Martin, John C., Professor Emeritus, Civil Engineering 
B.E., M.E., Yale University 

Marx, Paul, Professor Emeritus, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.EA., University of Iowa; Ph.D., New York University 

Maxwell, David A., Professor Emeritus, Criminal Justice 

M.A., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; B.B.A., J.D., University of Miami 

Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Professor Emeritus, Visual and Performing Arts 
B.F.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 

Robillard, Douglas, Professor Emeritus, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Smith, Warren J., Professor Emeritus, Management and Quantitative Analysis 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 

Staugaard, Burton C., Professor Emeritus, Science and Biology 
A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Surti, Kantilal K, Professor Emeritus, Electrical and Computer Engineering 



245 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware; 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Theilman, Ward, Professor Emeritus, Economics 
B.A., Pii.D., University of Illinois 

Tyndall, Bruce, Professor Emeritus, Mathematics 
B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 

van Dyke, Elisabeth, Professor Emeritus, Tourism and Travel Administration 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professor Emeritus, Mechanical Engineering 
B.E., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor Emeritus, Science and Biology 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Lawrence J. DeNardis, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., President 

Evelyn R. Miller, Assistant to the President and to the Chairman of the Board 

Lucy M. Wendland, Executive Secretary 

Marilou McLaughlin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., president, UNH Foundation 

OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 
FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS AND PROVOST 

John D. Hatfield, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Executive Vice President and Provost 
Silvia I. Hyde, Assistant to the Executive Vice President and Provost 

Ira H. Kleinfeld, B.S., M.S., Eng.Sc.D., Associate Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies 
Judith Orrange, Executive Secretary 

Gordon R. Simerson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University Accreditation Officer and 
Associate Dean of the College of Arts &:Sciences 

MARVIN K. PETERSON LIBRARY 

Hanko H. Dobi, B.A., M.L.S., University Librarian 
Steven A. Chaput, B.A., M.L.S., Head of Circulation 



Board, Administration & Faculty 246 

Xaio Jun Cheng, B.A., M.L.S., Head of Reference 

Marion Hamilton Sachdeva, B.A., M.S.L.S., Head of Technical Services 

Robert Belletzkie, A.L.B. M.L.S., Reference Librarian 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ira H. Kleinfeld, B.S., M.S., Eng.Sc.D., Associate Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies 

Angela Schutz, B.S., M.A., Program Manager 

Judy Orrange, Executive Secretary 

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES 

Daniel N. Nelson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean 

Gordon R. Simerson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean 

Angela J. Flynn, Executive Secretary 

DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS/DIRECTORS 
Michael J. Rossi, B.S., Ph.D., Chair, Biology and Environmental Science 
Sandra D'Amato-Palumbo, B.S., M.P.S., R.D.H., Director, Dental Hygiene 
Shirley Wakin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, Education 

Gwatkin, Phyllis, B.S., M.S., C.A.G.S., Chief Certification Officer & 
Director of Student Teaching 

Maiorino, Nicholas, B.S., 5th Year Certificate, M.S., 6th Year Certificate, 
Coordinator of Interns 

Donald M. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, English 

Thomas Katsaros, B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Chair, History 

Robert W. FitzGerald, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Director, Graduate Program in Human Nutrition 

W. Thurmon Whitley, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, Mathematics and Physics; 
Director, Honors Program 

Natalie J. Ferringer, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, Political Science 

Thomas L. Mentzer, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Psychology 

Guillermo E. Mager, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, Visual/Performing Arts and Philosophy 

GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATORS/DIRECTORS 

Eva Sapi, B.S., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Science in Cellular and Molecular Biology 



247 

Robert J. Hofiiiung, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Arts in 
Community Psychology 

Shirley Wakin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Science in Education 

Roman N. Zajac, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Science in 
Environmental Science 

Robert W. FitzGerald, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Director, Master of Science in Human Nutrition 

Tara L'Heureux, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Arts in 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES 

Auerbach, Meredith, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., State University of Nev^ York at Albany 

Ayers, James, Assistant Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State University; M.S., Purdue University 

Bell, Srilekha, Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras, India; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Bradshaw, Alfred, Associate Professor, Sociology 
B.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Carriuolo, Ralf E., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt School of Music; Ph.D., Wesleyan University 

Celotto, Albert G., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.M., Western Connecticut State College; M.M., Indiana University School of Music 

Chavent, Georgia, Assistant Professor, Dietetics 

B.S. University of New Hampshire; M.S., Columbia University; 
R.D., Medical College of Virginia 

Chepaitis, Joseph B., Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Cornacchia, Marcella, Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.S., University of New Haven; R.D.H. 

Cuomo, Carmela, Assistant Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 
B.A., Adelphi University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

D'Amato-Palumbo, Sandra, Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.P.S., Quinnipiac College; R.D.H. 

Davis, R. Laurence, Professor, Earth and Environmental Science 



Board, Administration & Faculty 248 

A.B., A.M., Washington University; Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Davis, Wesley J., Lecturer, EngHsh 

B.A., M.A., Southern Connecticut State University 

DeNardis, Lawrence J., Professor, PoHtical Science 

B.S., College of the Holy Cross; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Dinegar, Caroline A., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Dull, James W., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.Phil., 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Farrell, Richard J., Lecturer, English 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., University of Virginia; M.Phil., Yale University 

Ferringer, Natalie J., Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Gara, Gary W., Instructor, Education 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State University 

Glen, Robert A., Professor, History 

B.A., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Griffiths, Matthew, Assistant Professor, Physics 

B.S.C., University of Edinburgh; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh 

Hoffiiung, Robert J., Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Hyman, Arnold, Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Jafarian, Ali A., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Tehran University; M.S., Pahlavi University; Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Kacerik, Mark, Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene 
B.S., M.S., University of Bridgeport; R.D.H. 

Kaloyanides, Michael G., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 
B.A., Ph.D., Wesleyan University 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 



249 

Keilty, Bernard J., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Chaminade University; M.S., Southern Connecticut State University; 
M.A., Georgetown University 

L'Heureux-Barrett, Tara, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., State University of New York College at Pittsburgh; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Lieberman, Jonathan D., Assistant Professor, Education 

B.A., M.S., University of Hartford; Ed.D., University of Bridgeport 

Listro, Stephen, Instructor, English 

B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State University; M.A., University of Miami 

Mace, John H., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Ramapo College; M.A., Queens College; Ph.D., City University of New York 

Mager, Guillermo E., Associate Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Marks, Joel H., Professor, Philosophy 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Mehlman, Marc H., Associate Professor, Mathematics 
B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California, Riverside 

Mentzer, Thomas L., Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Mercer, Teal, Instructor, Dental Hygiene 

A.S., University of Bridgeport; B.S., Pennsylvania State University; R.D.H. 

Morris, Michael A., Professor, Psychology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 

Pepin, Paulette L., Assistant Professor, Education 

B.A., Western Connecticut State University; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Prajer, Renee, Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene 
M.S., University of Bridgeport; R.D.H. 

Rafalko, Robert J., Assistant Professor, Philosophy 

A.B., University of Scranton; M.A., Tufts University; Ph.D., Temple University 

Rosenthal, Erik, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., Queens College, City University of New York; M.S., State University of 
New York at Albany; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Rossi, Michael J., Associate Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 
B.S., Xavier University; Ph.D., University of Kentucky 



Board, Administration & Faculty 250 

Sachdeva, Baldev K., Professor, Mathematics 

B.Sc, M.A., Delhi University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Sandman, Joshua H., Professor, Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Nev^ York University 

Sapi, Eva, Assistant Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., Vorosmarty Gymnasium; Ph.D., Eotvos Lorand University (Hungary) 

Sharma, Ramesh, Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Banaras Hindu University, India; Ph.D., University of Windsor 

Simerson, Gordon R., Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., University of Delaware; M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Sloane, David E. E., Professor, English and Education 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Smith, Donald M., Professor, English 

A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., New York University 

Soares, Louise M., Professor, Education 

B.A., M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Somerville, Christy A., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

A. A., Fullerton College; B.A., M.A., California State University-Long Beach 

Todd, Edmund N., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Uebelacker, James W., Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Vieira, Marianna M., Lecturer, English 

B.A., Russell Sage; M.A., State University of New York at Albany; 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Vigue, Charles L., Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.A., M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Voegeli, Henry E., Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Volonino, Victoria, Instructor, Education 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.Ed., University of Missouri 

Wakin, Shirley, Professor, Mathematics and Education 

B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Whitley, W. Thurmon, Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Stetson University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 



251 

Williams, Brenda, Professor, Education, English 

B.A., Howard University; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University 

Yasmin, Kausar, Assistant Professor, Physics 

M.S., Ph.D., New Mexico State University 

York, Michael W, Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Zajac, Roman N., Associate Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 
B.S., Tufts University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE AND ACCREDITATION 
Chavent, Georgia, Registered Dietitian, American Dietetic Association 
Cornacchia, Marcella, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut 
D'Amato-Palumbo, Sandra, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut 

Davis, R. Laurence, Professional Geologist, South Carolina, Kentucky; 

Certified Professional Geologist, American Institute of Professional Geologists; 
Certified Professional Hydrogeologist, American Institute of Hydrology; 
Certified, Wilderness First Aid 

Hofifhung, Robert J., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 

Hyman, Arnold, Licensed Psychologist, Connecticut 

Kacerik, Mark, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut 

Mercer, Teal, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut 

Prajer, Renee, Registered Dental Hygienist, Connecticut 

York, Michael W., Licensed Psychologist, Connecticut 

ARTIST-IN RESIDENCE 

James Sinclair, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.M.Ed., Indiana University; M.A., University of Hawaii; L.H.D.(hon.), 
University of New Haven Music Director, Orchestra New England 

PRACTITIONERS-IN-RESIDENCE 

Abell, Norman, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., Villanova University; D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine 

Antenucci, Margaret, English 

B.A., M.A., Ohio State University 



Board, Administration & Faculty 252 

Asmus, Pamela, English 

B.A., Albertus Magnus College; M.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Brown University 

Blakin, Richard, Visual and Performing Arts and Philosophy 

Faculty (Recording), lAR School of Recording & Audio Technology 

Brubaker, David, Visual and Performing Arts and Philosophy 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.F.A., Art Institute of Chicago; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Laskowski, JoAnn, Education 

B.A. Queens College, M.A., University of Connecticut 

Mack, George, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., M.S., Central Connecticut State University; J.D., University of Connecticut 

McGough, Dennis, Psychology 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., University of New Haven; 
Ph.D., Union Institute in Cincinnati 

Perry, John, English 

B.A., University of New Haven 

Robichaud, Paul, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Western Ontario; Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Rossomando, Anthony J., Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook; Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Skora, David, Visual and Performing Arts and Philosophy 

B.S., Western Michigan University, M.A,, The School of Visual Arts 

White, Shane D., Biology and Environmental Science 
B. A., University of Vermont 

Zezulka, Charles, Education 

B.S., Eastern Connecticut State University; M.A., University of Connecticut 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Zeljan Schuster, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Interim Dean 
Madalana Duarte, Administrative Assistant 
Dawn Sheppard, Executive Secretary 

DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS/DIRECTORS 

Robert E. Wnek, B.S.B.A., J.D., LL.M., CPA, Chair, Accounting and Taxation 

Jerry L. Allen, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Communication 



253 

Steven J. Shapiro, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chair Economics and Finance 

Abbas Nadim, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Chair, Management 

Ben B. Judd, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Marketing and International Business 

Charles N. Coleman, B.A., M.P.A., Chair, PubHc Management 

William S. Y. Pan, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Chair, Quantitative Analysis 

Parbudyal Singh, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., AACSB Director 

Linda Carlone, B.S., Director of Operations/Associate Director, E.M.B.A. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DIRECTORS AND COORDINATORS 

Anziano, Leon B., B.S., M.S., Exec. Mgt. Program, Interim Director, 
Executive M.B.A. Program 

Dejan Knezevic, B.S., M.B.A., Program Coordinator, Executive M.B.A. Program 

Richard Laria, B.S., M.B.A., Director, M.B.A. and Accelerated Programs 

Charles N. Coleman, B.A., M.P.A., Coordinator, Master of Business Administration 
(M.B.A.), Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.), Master of Science in 
Health Care Administration, and Master of Science in Labor Relations 

Anshuman Prasad, B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Director, Doctoral Program in 
Management Systems (Sc.D.) 

FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Allen, Jerry L., Professor, Communication 

B.S., Southeast Missouri State College; M.S., 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 

Anziano, Leon B., Visiting Professor of Management 

B.S., M.S., Cornell University; Executive Management Program, 
University of Michigan 

Berman, Peter I., Professor, Finance 

A.B., Cornell University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Boynton, Wentworth, Visiting Assistant Professor, Finance 

B.A., Colby College; A.M., Brown University; M.A., M.B.A., 
University of Rhode Island 

Brody, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of Delaware; M.S., Colorado State University; 
Ph.D., Arizona State University 

Burke, W. Vincent, Instructor, Communication 



Board, Administration & Faculty 254 

B.S., M.Ed., Springfield College 

Coleman, Charles N., Assistant Professor, Public Management 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.P.A., West Virginia University 

Conrad, Cynthia, Associate Professor, Public Management 

B.A., Southern Illinois University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at ArUngton 

Daneshfar, Alireza, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.A., National University; M.S., Tehran University; Ph.D., Concordia University 

Dick, Ronald, Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., M.B.A., St. Joseph's University; Ed.D., Temple University 

Downe, Edward, Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research; 
A. PC, New York University 

Falcone, Paul C, Instructor, Communication 
B.S., M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Finn, Dale M., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Delaware; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Fried, Gil B., Associate Professor, Sports Management 

B.S., California State University-Sacramento; M.A., J.D., Ohio State University 

Goldberg, Martin A., Visiting Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.A., Clark University; M.S., Boston University; J.D., University of Connecticut; 
LL.M., New York University 

Grubacic, Sanja, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Belgrade; M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Haley, George T., Professor, Marketing 

B.A., B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Judd, Ben B., Professor, Marketing 

B.A., University of Texas; M.S., Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington 

Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Kublin, Michael, Professor, Marketing and International Business 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Indiana University; M.B.A., Pace University; 
Ph.D., New York University 

Lane, Scott G., Assistant Professor, Accounting 



255 

B.S.B.A., University of Massachusetts at Lowell; M.S., Texas A & M University; 
Ph.D., University of Kentucky 

Liang, Jiajuan, Assistant Professor, Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., M.S., Nankai University, P.R.C.; Ph.D., Hong Kong Baptist University 

Litvin, Deborah R., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.B.A., Boston University; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts at Amherst 

Martin, Linda R., Professor, Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., Regis College; Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

McDonald, Robert G., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., City College of New York; M.B.A., New York University; CMA, CIA, CFA, CPA 

McLaughlin, Marilou, Professor, Communication 

B.A., M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Mensz, Pawel, Associate Professor, Management and Quantitative Analysis 
B.S., M.E., M.S., Warsaw Polytechnic; 
Ph.D., Systems Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences 

Metchick, Robert, Visiting Assistant Professor, Management 
B.B.A., University of Miami; M.S., Cornell University; 
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Morris, David J., Jr., Professor, Marketing 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Moscove, Stephen, Professor, Accounting 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 

Nadim, Abbas, Professor, Management 

B.A., Abadan Institute of Technology, Iran; M.B.A., University of California, Berkeley; 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Neal, Judith A., Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Pan, William S. Y., Professor, Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan; M.B.A., Auburn University; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Parker, Joseph A., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Phelan, John J., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.S., M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., George Washington University 



Board, Administration & Faculty 256 

Prasad, Anshuman, Associate Professor, Management 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.B.A., University of Jamshedpur; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Rainish, Robert, Professor, Finance 

B.A., City College, New York; M.B.A., Bernard M. Baruch College; 
Ph.D., City University of New York 

Raucher, Steven A., Professor, Communication 

B.A., Queens College; M.S., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., Wayne State University; 
J.D., Bridgeport School of Law at Quinnipiac College 

Reid, Sean, Assistant Professor, Finance 

B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.B.A., Incarnate Word College 

Rodriguez, Armando, Associate Professor, Economics 
B.S., Ph.D., University of Texas 

RoUeri, Michael, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.B.A., University of Connecticut; CPA 

Roy, Subroto, Assistant Professor, Marketing 

M.S., Birla Institute of Technology and Science; Post Graduate Diploma, 

Institute of Rural Management, India; Ph.D., University of Western Sydney, Australia 

Sack, Allen L., Professor, Management [and Sociology] 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Sencicek, Mehmet, Assistant Professor, Economics 
B.S.B.A., University of Nevada-Reno 

Shapiro, Steven J., Associate Professor, Economics and Finance 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Singh, Parbudyal, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., University of Guyana; M.B.A., University of Windsor; Ph.D., McMaster University 

Smith, Donald C, Professor, Communication 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State University; M.S., Emerson College; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Schuster, Zeljan, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia 

Upadhyaya, Kamal, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Tribhuvan University, Nepal; M.A., Thammasat University, Thailand; 
Ph.D., Auburn University 



257 

Wang, Cheng Lu, Associate Professor, Marketing and International Business 

B.A., Shanghai Teacher's University; M.A., Southeast Missouri State University; 
Ed.S., University of Georgia; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 

Werblow, Jack, Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Cornell University; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Wnek, Robert E., Professor, Tax Law, Accounting and Business Law 

B.S.B.A., Villanova University; J.D., Delaware Law School of Widener University; 
LL.M., Boston University School of Law; CPA 

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE AND ACCREDITATION 

McDonald, Robert G., Certified Public Accountant, New York; CMA; CIA; CFA 

Parker, Joseph A., Accredited Personnel Specialist; National Panel Member, 
American Arbitration Association 

Rolleri, Michael, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 

Wnek, Robert E., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut; 
Member of the Bar, Connecticut, Pennsylvania 

PRACTITIONERS-IN-RESIDENCE 

Coviello, Salvatore C, Accounting 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.S., University of Hartford; CPA 

Dudley-Smith, Clotilde, Public Administration 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.P.A., University of New Haven 

Puglia, Michael, Accounting 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College; M.S., University of New Haven 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
& APPLIED SCIENCE 

Zulma R. Toro-Ramos, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean 
Michael A. CoUura, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Karen A. Ralph, Executive Secretary 



Board, Administration & Faculty 258 

DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS 

Michael A. Collura, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Chemistry/Chemical Engineering 

Gregory P. Broderick, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Civil/Environmental Engineering 

David Eggert, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Acting Chair, Computer Science 

Daniel C. O'Keefe, B.E.E., M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Chair, Electrical/Computer Engineering 

Ronald N. Wentworth, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Industrial Engineering 

John J. Sarris, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Mechanical Engineering 

GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATORS 

Barun Chandra, B.S., M.S., Ph.D./Tahany Fergany, B.S.E.E., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinators, 
Master of Science in Computer Science 

Bijan Karimi, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Agamemnon D. Koutsospyros, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator, 
Master of Science in Environmental Engineering 

Zulma R. Toro-Ramos, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator, 

Executive Master of Science in Engineering Management (EMSEM) 

Ronald N. Wentworth, B.S.M.E., M.S. I.E., Ph.D., Coordinator, 

Master of Science in Industrial Engineering, Master of Science in 
Operations Research, and M.B.A./M.S.I.E. Dual Degree 

Konstantine C. Lambrakis, B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Coordinator, 
Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF 
ENGINEERING & APPLIED SCIENCE 

Adams, William R., Associate Professor, Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., M.S., University of New Haven; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Aliane, Bouzid, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S.E.E., Ecole Polytechnique d'Alger; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of New York 

Barratt, Carl, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, University of Bristol, England; Ph.D., University of Cambridge, England 

Bogan, Samuel D., Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
IB.S., M.S., Ph.D., Boston University 

Broderick, Gregory P., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Northeastern University; Ph.D., University of Texas 



259 

Chandra, Barun, Associate Professor, Computer Science 

B.S., St. Stephen's College; M.S., Colorado State University; 
M.S., University of Rochester; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

CoUura, Michael A., Professor, Chemical Engineering 

B.S., Lafayette College; M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh University 

Desio, Peter J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Diesenhouse, Jacalyn, Lecturer, Computer Science 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Columbia University; M.Ed., Northeastern University 

Eggert, David, Assistant Professor, Computer Science 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of South Florida 

Faigel, Oleg, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Moscow Textile Institute 

Fergany, Tahany, Associate Professor, Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., Cairo University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Fischer, Alice E., Professor, Computer Science 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Fish, Andrew J., Jr., Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S.E.E., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; M.S., University of Iowa; 
M.S., St. Mary's University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Frey, Roger G., Professor, Computer Science 

B.A., Yale College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., Yale Law School 

Gibson, Gregory S., Lecturer, Computer Science 
B.A., University of Rochester 

Golbazi, AJi M., Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S., Detroit Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Gow, Arthur S., Ill, Associate Professor, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 
B.A., Muhlenberg College; B.A., B.S., University of Rhode Island; 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Harding, W. David, Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Horning, Darrell W., Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S., South Dakota School of Mines; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Hosay, Norman, Associate Professor, Computer Science 

B.A., Wayne State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 



Board, Administration & Faculty 260 

Karimi, Bijan, Associate Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S., Aryamehr University of Technology, Iran; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 

Kenig, M. Jerry, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Drexel University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Kleinfeld, Ira H., Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Eng.Sc.D., Columbia University 

Koutsospyros, Agamemnon D., Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 
B.S., M.S., National Technical University, Athens; 
M.S., Polytechnic Institute of New York; Ph.D., Polytechnic University 

Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 
B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S., University of New Haven; 
M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut 

Luzik, Eddie D., Assistant Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Montazer, M. Ali, Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Nocito-Gobel, Jean, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 
B.S., Manhattan College; M.S., Ohio State University; 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

O'Keefe, Daniel C, Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.E.E., City University of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon University; 
Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Orabi, Ismail, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Helwan University, Egypt; M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo; 
Ph.D., Clarkson University 

Ross, Stephen M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., New York University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Saliby, Michael J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Union College; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton 

Sarris, John J., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Purdue University 



f 



261 

Sonderegger, Elaine L., Assistant Professor, Computer Science 
B.S., M.S., E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Stanley, Richard M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Toro-Ramos, Zulma R., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., University of Puerto Rico; M.S., University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Wall, David J., Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Wentworth, Ronald N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University; M.S. I.E., University of Massachusetts; 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Wheeler, George L., Jacob Finley Buckman Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 
B.A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Maryland 

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE AND ACCREDITATION 

Bogan, Samuel D., Professional Engineer, Connecticut 

Broderick, Gregory R, EIT, Massachusetts 

CoUura, Michael A., Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania 

Faigel, Oleg, Professional Engineer, Connecticut 

Harding, W David, Professional Engineer, Indiana 

Koutsospyros, Agamemnon D., Professional Engineer, Greece 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, New Jersey 

Nocito-Gobel, Jean, EIT, New York 

Wall, David J., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Pennsylvania 

PRACTITIONERS-IN-RESIDENCE 

Page, Liberty, Computer Science 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Schwartz, Pauline M., Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Michigan Pharmacologist, Veterans Administration 
Medical Center; Research Scientist, Department of Dermatology, 
Yale University School of Medicine 



Board, Administration & Faculty 262 

THE TAGLIATELA SCHOOL 
OF HOSPITALITY & TOURISM 

Caroline A. Dinegar, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Program Director, School of Hospitality & Tourism 

William B. Williams, III, B.S., M.S., Associate Dean 

Marie L. Sacco, Executive Secretary 

Patrick Boisjot, Professional Baccalaureate, B.S., Chair, Culinary Arts 

Constantine E. Vlisides, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Science in Tourism 
and Hospitality Management; Chair, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Elisabeth van Dyke, Ph.D., Chair, Tourism Administration 

FACULTY OF THE TAGLIATELA 
SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY & TOURISM 

Boisjot, Patrick, Assistant Professor and Chef-In-Residence; Director, 

Institute of Gastromony and Culinary Arts; Professional Baccalaureate, Lycee Hotelier 
de Thonon-les-Bains, France; B.S., State University of New York Empire State College 

Murdy, James J., Assistant Professor, Tourism Administration 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Rowland, Patrick B., Assistant Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 
A.S., Culinary Institute of America; B.S. University of New Haven; 
M.S., University of New Haven; CPA 

van Dyke, Elisabeth, Professor Emeritus, Tourism and Travel Administration 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Vlisides, Constantine E., Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.A., University of Houston-Clear Lake; 
Ph.D., University of North Texas 

Williams, William B., Ill, Associate Professor, Hospitality 
B.S., M.S., University of New Haven 

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE AND ACCREDITATION 
Rowland, Patrick, B., Certified Public Accountant 

INSTITUTE OF GASTRONOMY & CULINARY ARTS 
Patrick Boisjot, Professional Baccalaureate, B.S., Director 



263 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SAPETY 
& PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

Thomas A. Johnson, B.S., M.S., D.Crim., Dean 

William M. Norton, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., J.D., Associate Dean 

Susan Cusano, Executive Secretary 

DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS/DIRECTORS 

Lynn Hunt Monahan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chair, Criminal Justice 

Robert E. Massicotte, Jr., B.S., M.S., Director, Fire Science 

Howard A. Harris, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., J.D., Director, Forensic Science 

Al Harper, B.A., Ph.D., J.D., Director, Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science 

Donna Decker Morris, B.S., J.D., Director, Legal Studies 

Brad T. Garber, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Chair, Department of Professional Studies; 
Director, Occupational Safety and Health 

Mario T. Gaboury, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., J.D., Director, Center for the Study of Crime 
Victim's Rights, Remedies and Resources 

Thomas A. Johnson, B.S., M.S., D.Crim, Director, Center for Cybercrime and 
Forensic Computer Investigation; National Security and Public Safety 

GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATORS 

William M. Norton, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., J.D., Coordinator, 
Master of Science in Criminal Justice 

Robert E. Massicotte, Jr., B.S., M.S., Director, Master of Science in Fire Science 

Howard A. Harris, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., J.D., Coordinator, Master of Science in Forensic Science 

Brad T. Garber, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator, Master of Science in Occupational Safety 
and Health Management and Master of Science in Industrial Hygiene 

FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL OF 

PUBLIC SAFETY & PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

Adcock, James M., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Lambuth College; M.P.A., Jacksonville State University; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 



Board, Administration & Faculty 264 

Bilous, Peter, Associate Professor, Forensic Science 

B.Sc, M.Sc, University of Manitoba; Ph.D., McGill University 

Cohen, Howard J., Associate Professor, Occupational Safety and Health 
B.A., Boston University; M.PH., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Dunston, Nelson, Assistant Professor, Fire Science 

B.A., St. Mary's College of Maryland; M.S., University of Maryland College Park 

Gaboury, Mario T., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., University of Maryland; 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; J.D., Georgetown University Law Center 

Garber, Brad T., Professor, Occupational Safety and Health J 

B.S., M.S., Drexel University; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 1 

Genre, Charles T., Visiting Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., University of New Orleans; M.S., Florida State University 

Harris, Howard A., Associate Professor, Forensic Science 

A.B., Western Reserve University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University; 
J.D., St. Louis University Law School 

Hunter, David P., Associate Professor, Aviation Management 
B.S., Wagner College; M.P.A., University of New Haven 

Iliescu, Sorin, Assistant Professor, Fire Science 

B.S.M.E., University of Bucharest, Romania; M.S., University of New Haven 

Johnson, Thomas A., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., M.S., Michigan State University; D.Crim., University of California, Berkeley 

Lainas, George D., Lecturer, Aviation 

B.A., Hellenic College; M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Lawlor, Michael P., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

M.A., University of London, England; J.D., George Washington University 
National Law Center; State Representative, Connecticut 

Lee, Henry C., Professor, Forensic Science 

B.A., Taiwan Central Police College; B.S., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; 
M.S., Ph.D., New York University 

Massicotte, Robert E., Jr., Assistant Professor, Fire Science 
B.S., M.S., University of New Haven 

Miller, Marilyn, Assistant Professor, Forensic Science 

B.A., Florida Southern College; M.S., University of Pittsburgh 

Monahan, James, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University 



265 

Monahan, Lynn Hunt, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., McGill University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Donna Decker Morris, Assistant Professor, Legal Studies 
B.S., Tufts University; J.D., Yale Law School 

Norton, William M., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., University of Southern Mississippi; 

M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University; J.D., University of Connecticut School of Law 

O'Connor, Martin J., Associate Professor, Fire Science 

B.A., University of New Haven; J.D., University of Connecticut School of Law 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; 
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Robin, Gerald D., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A,, Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Saville, Gregory, Research Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.A., M.S., York University 

FACULTY PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE AND ACCREDITATION 

Cohen, Howard J., Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of Industrial Hygiene 

Gaboury, Mario T., Attorney at Law, Connecticut; Connecticut Bar Association 

Garber, Brad T., Certified in General Toxicology, Certified in the Comprehensive 
Practice of Industrial Hygiene, Certified Safety Professional 

Haskins, Mark B., Certified Safety Professional 

Hunter, David P., Airline Transport Rated Pilot, Certified Flight Instructor, 
Certified Ground Instructor 

Massicotte, Robert E., Jr., Certified Hazardous Materials Inspector, 
Certified Fire Investigator, Certified Fire Code Inspector 

Monahan, James, Licensed Psychologist, Connecticut 

Monahan, Lynn, Licensed Psychologist, Connecticut, Massachusetts 

Norton, William M., Attorney at Law, Connecticut, Georgia; 
American Bar Association, Connecticut Bar Association 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Consulting Psychologist, Wisconsin; Certified Psychologist, 
Province of Alberta, Canada 



Board, Administration & Faculty 266 

PRACTITIONERS-IN-RESIDENCE 

Bailey, John, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Ashland College; J.D., Columbus School of Law, Catholic University of America 

Carbone, William H., Criminal Justice 

B.A., Providence College; M.P.A., University of New Haven; Executive Director, 
Court Support Services Division, Judicial Branch, State of Connecticut 

Cioffi, Nicholas A., Criminal Justice 

B.S., St. Michael's College; J.D., University of Connecticut School of Law; 
Director, Center for Judicial Technology, Information Management and Public Policy 

D'Amico, Salvatore, Criminal Justice 
M.A., University of New Haven 

Haskins, Mark B., Occupational Safety and Health 

B.S., State University College at Brockport; M.S., University of New Haven; 
Manager, Safety and Health, Pfizer Groton Production Division 

Looney, Martin, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Fairfield University; M.A., University of Connecticut; 

J.D., University of Connecticut School of Law; State Senator, Connecticut 

Rubin, Leonard, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook 

Wezner, George, Criminal Justice 
B.S., University of New Haven 

DISTINGUISHED SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Vasquez, Lewis, Center for Forensic Computer Investigation 

B.A., Norwich University; M.P.A., M.B.A., University of Hartford 

CALIFORNIA CAMPUS FACULTY FOR THE 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SAFETY & PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

Thomas A. Johnson, B.S., M.S., D.Crim., Dean 

Colleen R. Johnson, B.S., Director, Student Enrollment Management 

DeHaan, John, Forensic Science 

B.S., University of Illinois at Chicago Circle; Ph.D., University of Strathclyde, Scotland 

lannone, Albert, Fire Science 

B.V.E., California State University, M.PA., California State University-Sacramento 

Jarzen, Robert, Coordinator, Forensic Science 

B.S., Northern Illinois University; M.S., Arizona State University 



267 

CALIFORNIA CAMPUS PRACTITIONERS-IN-RESIDENCE 

Anthony, Rob, M.D., Forensic Science 

Medical Board of California, Physician and Surgeon 

Cohen, Fred, Center for Forensic Computer Investigation 

B.S., Carnegie Mellon University; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; 

Ph.D., University of Southern California; Principal Member, Technical Staff, 

Sandia National Laboratories 

Mayfield, Ross, Practitioner-in-Residence 
M.B.A., Pepperdine University 

Reiber, Gregory, M.D., Forensic Science 
Medical Board of California, Physician 

CALIFORNIA CAMPUS DISTINGUISHED SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Cohen, Susan, Forensic Science 
M.S., Walden University 

Feer, Fred, Forensic Science 

B.A., Clark University; M.A., University of California, Los Angeles 

Getty, Tom, Forensic Science 

J.D., University of California, Berkeley; Executive Director, 
State Attorney General's Association 

Kelso, Clark, Forensic Science 

B.A., University of Illinois; J.D., Columbia University School of Law 

Krutz, Ron, Forensic Science 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Miller, Gary, Forensic Science 

B.A., California State University-Sacramento; Electronic Crimes Task Force 

Miller, Mark, Forensic Science 

J.D., Lincoln Law School of Sacramento, California 

Nicholson, George, Forensic Science 

J.D., University of California, Hastings College of the Law 
Associate Justice, Cout of Appeal, State of California 

O'Maley, Thomas, Forensic Science 
B.S., Boston College 

Sappington, Jeanne, Forensic Science 

Ph.D., University of Western Ontario 



Board, Administration & Faculty 268 

Tippit, John, Forensic Science 

A.A., Santa Barbara City College 

Watson, Ken, Forensic Science 

M.S., Southern Methodist University 

CENTER FOR CYBERCRIME AND 
FORENSIC COMPUTER INVESTIGATION 

Anderson, Michael, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 
B.S., Weber State University; President, New Technologies, Inc. 

Cotton, Fred, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

A.S., Yuba College; Director, Training Services and Technology Program, 
SEARCH Group: National Consortium for Justice Information and Statistics 

Donlon, Matthew, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

B.S., Radford University; Former Director, Computer Security, NSA 

Giovagnoni, Robert, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 
Former Chief Counsel; President, Critical Infrastructure Group; 
Executive Vice President, I-Defense 

Kelso, Robert, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

Retired Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigation Division 

Kolodney, Steve E., Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., University of California, Berkeley; 
Chief of Information Technology and Systems, State of Washington 

Lewis, Glenn, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

B.S., California State University-Sacramento, Kroll World-Wide Inc. 

Malinowski, Christopher, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 
B.S., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; M.S., C.W. Post Campus, 
Long Island University; Commanding Officer, New York City Police Department 
Computer Crime Unit 

Manson, Kevin, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

B.A., University of Washington; J.D. University of South Dakota; Computer Crime 
Instructor, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center 

Menz, Mark, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

California State University-Sacramento, Kroll World-Wide Inc. 

Menz, Michael, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

California State University-Sacramento; Sacramento Valley Hi-Tech Crimes Task 
Force, Sacramento County Sheriff's Department 



269 



Schmidt, Raemarie, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; National White Collar Crime Center 

Spernow, William, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 
B.S., M.B.A., California State University— Sacramento 

Tafoya, William, Teaching Affiliate and Professional Practitioner 
Retired, Federal Bureau of Investigation 

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR 

ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT 

James E. Shapiro, B.S., J.D., Vice President for Enrollment Management 
and Career Development 

Linda Morris, Executive Secretary 

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS 

Jane C. Sangeloty, B.A., Director of Admissions 

Eric C. Dobler, B.A., Associate Director, Undergraduate Admissions 

Rob Miller, B.S., M.S., Assistant Director, Undergraduate Admissions 
Acting Director, Institutional Research 

Pauline M. Hill, Director of Operations 

INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS 

Joseph F. Spellman, B.S., M.A., Director of International Admissions 
Karen M. Ludington, Assistant Director of International Admissions 

FINANCIAL AID 

Karen M. Flynn, B.A., M.A., Acting Director, Financial Aid 
Christopher Maclean, B.A., Assistant Director, Financial Aid 

UNDERGRADUATE RECORDS 

Nancy A. Carroll, B.S., M.S., Undergraduate Registrar 
Sally Ann A. McCuUough, Assistant Registrar 



Board, Administration & Faculty 270 

ACADEMIC SERVICES 

Kathryn H. Cuozzo, B.S., M.S., Director of Academic Services 

Rosalie S. Swift, B.S., Coordinator of Academic Services; University Ombudsperson 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 
Kathryn Link, B.A., Associate Director 

UNH-SOUTHEASTERN CONNECTICUT 

Michelle Mason, B.A., Campus Director 
Jessie Casaneda, B.S., Marketing Coordinator 

GRADUATE ADMISSIONS 

Pamela Sommers, B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Director of Graduate Admissions 

Eloise M. Gormley, B.A., Assistant Director of Graduate Admissions 

GRADUATE RECORDS 

Virginia D. Klump, Graduate Registrar 
Michaela H. Apotrias, Assistant Registrar 
Alice P. Perrelli, Assistant Registrar 

MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Richard S. Eaton, Director of Marketing and Public Relations 
Susan Pranulis, B.S., Production Manager/Graphic Designer 
Sandra V. Abbagnaro, A.S., Coordinator, Marketing Operations 
Letitia H. Bingham, B.A., M.A., Editor, University Publications 
Barbara Hoyt, B.A., B.F.A., Graphic, Designer 

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 

FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS AND ATHLETICS 

William M. Leete, B.S., M.Ed., Vice President for Student Affairs and Athletics 
Ann Massini, Executive Secretary 



271 

Residential Life 

Rebecca D. Johnson, B.A., M.A., Associate Dean and Director 

Patricia Christiano, B.A., M.A., M.S., Associate Director 
Athletics 

Deborah Chin, B.S.E., M.S., Athletic Director 
Facilities 

Justin T. McManus, B.S., Director 
University Police 

Henry A. Starkel, B.S., M.S., Chief 
Campus Center & Student Activities 

Kelly J. McGiU, B.S., M.A., Director 
Counseling Center 

Deborah Everhart, B.A., M.A., Ph.D, Director 

Danielle I. Moreggi, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Director 
Disability Services & Resources 

Linda Copney-Okeke, B.S., Director 
Health Services 

Paula Cappuccia, R.N,, Director 
International Student Services 

Andrea Hogan, B.A., M.S., Director 
Multicultural Affairs 

Johnnie M. Fryer, B.A., M.A., M.S., Director 
University Dining Services (Wood Company) 

Miklos Horvath, Director 

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 
FOR FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 

Duncan P. Gifford, B.S., M.B.A., CPA, Vice President for Finance Administration, 
and Treasurer of the University 

Sally H. Resnik, Finance Associate 

Diane Devine, B.S., M.B.A., CPA, Controller 

Frances A. MacMillan, Bursar 

David C. Hennessey, A.B., M.B.A., M.S., Director of Human Resources 



Board, Administration & Faculty 272 

Mark Long, B.A., Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Officer 

DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION SERVICES 
Vincent Mangiacapra, B.S., M.S., Chief Information Officer 

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 
FOR UNFVERSITY ADVANCEMENT 

Thad Henry, B.A., M.A., Vice President for University Advancement 

Joanne Roy, Executive Secretary 

Jacqueline Koral, B.A., M.A., Director of Development 

Alison Clark, B.S, Major Gift Officer 

Mary Ann Slomski, B.S, Director of University Relations 

Virgina D. Zawoy, B.A., Director, Corporate and Foundation Relations 

Scott Davis, B.S., Director of the Annual Fund 

Jill Zamparo, B.S., M.S., Manager, Events/Stewardship 

Jennifer Pjatak, B.S., University Relations Associate 

William F. X. Flynn, Alumni Relations Associate 

Carl Pitruzzello, B.S., M.B.A., Director of Advancement Services 

Michelle Norman, Coordinator of Research and Prospect Management 

DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES FOR STUDENTS 

Audiovisual Services 

Paul Falcone, B.S., M.B.A., Coordinator 
Bursar's Office 

Frances A. MacMillan, Bursar 
Campus Center & Student Activities 

Kelly J. McGiU, B.S., M.A., Director 
Career Development 

Kathryn Link, B.A., Associate Director 
Center for Learning Resources 

Loretta K. Smith, B.A., M.A., Director 



273 



Counseling Center 

Deborah Everhart, B.A., M.A., Ph.D, Director 

Danielle I. Moreggi, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Director 
Disability Services & Resources 

Linda Copney-Okeke, B.S., Director 
Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action 

Mark Long, B.A., Equal Opportunity/ Affirmation Action Officer 

Health Services 

Paula Cappuccia, R.N., Director 

International Student Services 

Andrea Hogan, B.A., M.S., Director 

Multicultural Affairs 

Johnnie M. Fryer, B.A., M.A., M.S., Director 

Residential Life 

Rebecca D. Johnson, B.A., M.A., Associate Dean and Director 

Patricia S. Christiano, B.A., M.A., M.S., Associate Director 
UNH Web Site 

Alan MacDougall, B.A., Webmaster 
Veterans' Affairs Officer 

Virginia D. Klump, Graduate Registrar 
WNHU Radio Station 

W. Vincent Burke, B.S., M.Ed., General Manager 



Board, Administration & Faculty 274 



UNDERGRADUATE 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

2002 - 2004 



FALL SEMESTER 2002 

August Tuition and residence charges due Thursday, Aug. 1 

Residence halls open for new students at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 24 

Orientation Saturday-Tuesday, Aug. 24-27 

Residence halls open for returning students Tuesday, Aug. 27 

Classes begin Wednesday, Aug. 28 



September Labor Day-no classes 

Last day to submit an ADD card 



Monday, Sept. 2 
Wednesday, Sept. 1 1 



October Last day to petition for January graduation 

Last day to drop a course 



Tuesday, Oct. 15 
Friday, Oct. 18 



November Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 

Thanksgiving Weekend— no classes 



Tuesday, Nov. 26 
Wednesday-Saturday, Nov. 27-30 



December 



Classes end 

Reading days 

Evening exams begin 

Day exam period 

Last day of the semester 

Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 

Commencement, 2 p.m. 



Monday, Dec. 9 

Tuesday- Wednesday, Dec. 10-11 

Wednesday, Dec. 11 

Thursday-Tuesday, Dec. 12-17 

Tuesday, Dec. 17 

Tuesday, Dec. 17 

Saturday, Jan. 18, 2003 



275 



January 



INTERSESSION 2003 



Classes begin 

Martin Luther King Day-no classes 

Classes end 



SPRING SEMESTER 2003 



Thursday, Jan. 2 

Monday, Jan. 20 

Wednesday, Jan. 22 



January 



February 



March 



April 



May 



Tuition and residence charges due 

Residence halls open for new students 

Orientation 

Residence halls open for returning students 

Classes begin 

Last day to submit an ADD card 
Presidents' Day-no classes 

Last day to petition for May graduation 
Last day to drop a course 
Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 
Spring Recess-no classes 
Classes resume 



Thursday, Jan. 2 

Tuesday, Jan. 21 

Wednesday, Jan. 22 

Wednesday, Jan. 22 

Thursday, Jan. 23 

Thursday, Feb. 6 
Monday, Feb. 17 

Monday, Mar. 3 

Friday, Mar. 7 

Friday, Mar. 7 

Monday-Saturday, Mar. 10-15 

Monday, Mar. 17 



Passover, Holy Thursday, 
Good Friday-no classes 

Classes end 

Reading days 

Evening exams begin 

Day exam period 

Last day of the semester 

Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 

Commencement, 10 a.m. 



Thursday- Friday, Apr. 17-18 

Monday, May 12 

Tuesday- Wednesday, May, 13-14 

Wednesday, May 14 

Thursday-Tuesday, May 15-20 

Tuesday, May 20 

Tuesday, May 20 

Saturday, May 24 



Board, Administration & Faculty 276 



SUMMER SESSIONS 2003 



May 

June 
July 



August 



First Summer Session classes begin 
Memorial Day-no classes 

Last day to petition for August awarding of degrees 

First Summer Session ends 
Independence Day— no classes 
Second Summer Session classes begin 

Second Summer Session ends 

FALL SEMESTER 2003 



Wednesday, May 21 
Monday, May 26 

Monday, June 16 

Tuesday, July 1 

Friday, July 4 

Monday, July 7 

Friday, Aug. 15 



August Tuition and residence charges due Friday, Aug. 1 

Residence halls open for new students at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 23 

Orientation Saturday-Tuesday, Aug. 23-26 

Residence halls open for returning students Tuesday, Aug. 26 

Classes begin Wednesday, Aug. 27 



September Labor Day— no classes 

Last day to submit an ADD card 

October Last day to petition for January graduation 

Last day to drop a course 

November Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 

Thanksgiving Weekend-no classes 



December 



Classes end 

Reading Days 

Evening exams begin 

Day exam period 

Last day of the semester 

Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 

Commencement, 2 p.m. 



Monday, Sept. 1 
Wednesday, Sept. 10 

Wednesday, Oct. 15 
Friday, Oct. 17 

Tuesday, Nov. 25 
Wednesday-Saturday, Nov. 26-29 

Monday, Dec. 8 

Tuesday- Wednesday, Dec. 9-10 

Wednesday, Dec. 10 

Thursday-Tuesday, Dec. 11-16 

Tuesday, Dec. 16 

Tuesday, Dec. 16 

Saturday, Jan. 17, 2004 



277 



INTERSESSION 2004 



January Classes begin 

Martin Luther King Day-no classes 
Classes end 



Monday, Jan. 5 

Monday, Jan. 19 

Wednesday, Jan. 21 



SPRING SEMESTER 2004 



January 



February 



March 



April 
May 



Tuition and residence charges due Friday, Jan. 2 

Residence halls open for new students Tuesday, Jan. 20 

Orientation Tuesday- Wednesday, Jan. 20-21 

Residence halls open for returning students Wednesday, Jan. 2 1 

Classes begin Thursday, Jan. 22 



Last day to submit an ADD card 
Presidents' Day-no classes 

Last day to petition for May graduation 
Last day to drop a course 
Residence halls close at 5 p.m. 
Spring Recess-no classes 
Classes resume 



Thursday, Feb. 5 
Monday, Feb. 16 

Monday, Mar. 1 

Friday, Mar. 5 

Friday, Mar., 5 

Monday-Saturday, Mar. 8-13 

Monday, Mar. 15 



Friday, Apr. 9 



Good Friday-no classes; a make-up class is to be 

scheduled on a Saturday between Mar. 1 5 and May 1 

Classes end Monday, May 10 

Reading days Tuesday- Wednesday, May 11-12 

Evening exams begin Wednesday, May 12 

Day exam period Thursday-Tuesday, May 13-18 

Last day of the semester Tuesday, May 18 

Residence halls close at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 18 

Commencement, 10 a.m. Saturday, May 22 



Board, Administration & Faculty 278 

SUMMER SESSIONS 2004 

May First Summer Session classes begin Wednesday, May 19 

Memorial Day— no classes Monday, May 31 

June Last day to petition for August awarding of degrees Tuesday, June 15 

First Summer Session ends Wednesday, June 30 

July Independence Day-no classes Sunday-Monday, July 4-5 

Second Summer Session classes begin Tuesday, July 6 

August Second Summer Session ends Monday, Aug. 16 



UNH SOUTHEASTERN 



UNDERGRADUATE TRIMESTER CALENDAR 

Fall Term 2002 Monday, Sept. 9 - Friday, Dec. 13 

Last day to petition for January graduation Tuesday, Oct. 15 

Thanksgiving recess-no classes Monday-Friday, Nov. 25-29 

Commencement, 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 18, 2003 

Winter Term 2003 Monday, Jan. 6 - Friday, Apr. 4 

Martin Luther King Day-no classes Monday, Jan. 20 

Make-up class for Martin Luther King Day Friday, Jan. 24 

Presidents' Day-no classes Monday, Feb. 17 

Make-up class for Presidents' Day Friday, Feb. 21 

Last day to petition for May graduation Monday, Mar. 3 



279 



Spring Term 2003 



Monday, Apr. 7 - Friday, July 4 



Good Friday-no classes 

Commencement, 10 a.m. 

Memorial Day-no classes 

Make-up class for Memorial Day 

Independence Day— no classes 

Make-up class for Independence Day 

Last day to petition for August awarding of degrees 



Friday, Apr. 18 

Saturday, May 24 

Monday, May 26 

Friday, May 30 

Friday, July 4 

TBA 

Monday, June 16 



Summer Term 2003 



Fall Term 2003 



Monday, July 7 - Friday, Aug. 1 5 
Monday, Sept. 8 - Friday, Dec. 12 



Last day to petition for January graduation Wednesday, Oct. 1 5 

Thanksgiving recess-no classes Monday- Friday, Nov. 24-28 

Commencement Saturday, 2 p.m., Jan. 17, 2004 



Winter Term 2004 



Martin Luther King Day-no classes 
Make-up class for Martin Luther King Day 
Presidents' Day-no classes 
Make-up class for Presidents' Day 
Last day to petition for May graduation 



Monday, Jan. 5 - Friday, Apr. 2 

Monday, Jan. 19 

Friday, Jan. 23 

Monday, Feb. 16 

Friday, Feb. 20 

Monday, March 1 



Spring Term 2004 



Monday, April 5 - Friday, July 2 



Good Friday-no classes 

Commencement, 10 a.m. 

Memorial Day-no classes 

Make-up class for Memorial Day 

Last day to petition for August awarding of degrees 



Friday, April 9 
Saturday, May 22 
Monday, May 31 

Friday, June 4 
Tuesday, June 1 5 



Summer Term 2004 



Tuesday, July 6 - Monday, Aug. 16 



280 



INDEX 



A 

Absence, Leave of 46 

Academic Advising 17, 20 

Academic Calendar 274 

Academic Credit 38 

Academic Honesty 47 

Academic Regulations 38 

Academic Requirements, 

Financial Aid 55 

Academic Services 20 

Academic Status and Progress 41 

Academic Worksheets 42 

Accounting Courses (A) 151 

Accounting, Department of 95 

Accreditation 9 

Adding a Class 45 

Administration 242 

Admission and Registration 31 

Admission, Conditional 32 

Admission Procedures 31 

Division of Full-Time Admissions . .31 
New Full-Time Students/ 

Freshmen 31 

Full-Time Transfer Students 31 

International Students 32 

Division of Part-Time Admissions ..33 

Admission Requirements 33 

Admission Procedure 33 

Admission, Policy 32 

Advanced Placement 31, 32 

Advanced Study 41 

Aid Programs, Financial 56 

Air Transportation Management 148 

Alpha Phi Sigma 138 

Alumni Audits 35 

Alumni Relations 25 

American Society of Civil 

Engineers, Student Chapter 115 

American Societ)' of Mechanical 
Engineers, see ASME 

Art Certificates 88 

Art (B.A.) 85 

Art Courses (AT) 159 

Arts and Sciences, College of 61 

ASCE, see American Society 

of Civil Engineers 
ASME (American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers) 128 

Associate's Degrees 12 

Associate's Degree Core 

Requirements 17 

Athletic Facilities 26 

Athletic Grants-In-Aid 56 



Athletics 25 

Attendance Regulations 47 

Aviation 148 

Aviation Courses (AE) 158 

Aviation Science 148 

B 

Bachelor's Degrees 12 

Bachelor's Degree Core 

Requirements 15 

Biochemistr)' 66 

Bioengineering 69 

Biology and Environmental Science, 

Department of 65 

Biology Courses (Bl) 162 

Biotechnology 67 

Black Studies 76 

Board, Administration and Faculty . . .235 

Board Fees 52 

Board of Governors 235 

Bookstore, see Campus Store 

Bureau for Business Research 29 

Business Administration 100 

Business Administration 

Courses (BA) 161 

Business Economics 98 

Business Law Courses (LA) 209 

Business, School of 93 

c 

Calendar, Academic 224 

Calendar, Southeastern 

Connecticut 278 

Campaign Management, see 

Public Policy 

Campus Card 21 

Campus Copy 29 

Campus Facilities 27 

Campus Security Act 14 

Campus Store 28 

Career Development Office 21 

Center for Learning Resources 20 

Center for Family Business 30 

Center for the Study of Crime Victims' 

Rights, Remedies and Resources . . . .30 

Certificates 35 

Changes 45 

Changing a Major 46 

Charger Bulletin, The 26 

Charger Gymnasium 26 

Chariot, The 26 



Chemical Engineering 69 

Chemical Engineering, 

Department of Chemistry 109 

Chemical Engineering Club 1 10 

Chemical Engineering 

Courses (CM) 176 

Chemistry 69 

Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 

Department of (Arts & Sciences) 69 

Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 

Department of (Engineering) 109 

Chemistry Club 110 

Chemistry Courses (CH) 169 

Chi Epsilon 115 

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 

Department of 114 

Civil Engineering Courses (CE) 165 

Civil Engineers, American 

Society of 115 

Class (student class level) 42 

Class, Dropping/ Adding a 45 

Class, Withdrawal from a 46 

Club Managers Association of America, 

Student Chapter 130 

Clubs and Organizations 26 

College of Arts & Sciences 61 

College Work Study Program 57 

Commencement 48 

Communication Certificates 70, 97 

Communication Courses (CO) 178 

Communication, Department of 

(Arts & Sciences) 70 

Communication, Department of 

(Business) 96 

Community-Clinical Psychology 84 

Computer Engineering Courses (CEN) 168 
Computer Engineering, 

Department of Electrical 119 

Computer Facilities 27 

Computer Science Courses (CS) 181 

Computer Science (Mathematics) 79 

Computer Science, Department of . . .116 

Conditional Admission 32 

Connecticut Independent Colleges 

Student Grant Program 56 

Cooperative Education (Co-op) 22 

Coordinated Course 39 

Core Curriculum 15 

Corporate Programs, Oflf-Campus ... .36 

Corrections 138 

Counseling Center 22 

Councils (Student Government) 26 

Courses (Descriptions) 156 

Course Overload Restrictions 34 

Coursework Expectations 48 



281 



Courses Available at other Colleges ... .39 

Credit, Academic 38 

Credit by Examination 40 

Credit for Prior Learning 33 

Credit, Transfer 38 

Credit, Ways of Earning 38 

Criminal Justice 139 

Criminal Justice Certificates 143 

Criminal Justice Club 140 

Criminal Justice Courses (CJ) 171 

Culinary Arts &C Gastronomy 136 

Culinary Arts & Gastronomy Courses 164 

Curricula, University 15 

CWSP, see College Work Study Program 

D 

Dean's List 44 

Deferred Enrollment 33 

Degrees Offered by the University 
(see also Programs of Study listing on 

page 6) 12 

Dental Hygiene 71 

Dental Hygiene Courses (DH) 183 

Developmental Studies Program . . .18, 19 

Dietetics 73 

Dietetics, General Courses (Dl) 185 

Differential, Tuition 54 

Disabilities Services 22, 23 

Dismissal/Readmission Procedure 45 

Dining Services 24 

Diversity policy 13 

Dropping/ Adding a Class 45 

Drug Policy 14 

E 

Economics Courses (EC) 189 

Economics/Finance, Department of 

(Business) 74, 98 

Education, Department of 74 

Electrical and Computer Engineering, 

Department of 119 

Electrical Engineering Courses (EE) . .190 

ELS Language Center 29 

Employment, Student 21, 57 

Engineering and Applied Science, 

School of 105 

Engineering Science Courses (ES) . . . .196 

English Courses (E) 186 

English, Deparment of 75 

Enrollment, Deferred 33 

Entrepreneurship, Minor in 101 

Environmental Science Program 67 

Environmental Science Courses (EN) .194 
Evening Student Council 26 



Expenses, Tuition, Fees and 50 

External Credit Examinations 40 

F 

Facilities, Athletic 25 

Facilities, Campus 27 

Faculty 242 

Family Education Loan Program 

(FELP) 57 

Family Educational Rights 

& Privacy Act 13 

Fees and Expenses, Tuition 50 

Field Experiences 41 

Finance 99 

Finance Courses (FI) 197 

Financial Aid 55 

Fire and Occupational Safety 151 

Fire Administration 150 

Fire/Arson Investigation 149 

Fire Prevention Certificate 152 

Fire Protection Engineering 151 

Fire Science 149 

Fire Science Certificates 152 

Fire Science Clubs 149 

Fire Science Courses (FS) 198 

Fire Science Technology 150 

Foreign Language Study 75 

Foreign Students, see 

International Students 
Forensice Computer Investigation 

Certificate 144 

Forensic Science 142 

Fraternities and Sororities 26 

French Courses (FR) 198 

Freshman Experience (FE) 196 

Freshman Year Program 19 

Full-time Students Academic Status 

and Progress 41 

G 

(lastronomy and Culinary Arts 136 

General Biology 66 

General Dietetics 131 

General Dietetics Courses (DI) 181 

General Engineering 108 

General Psycholog)' 83 

General Studies 64 

German Courses (GR) 201 

Government, Student 26 

Grade Point Average, see 
Quality Point Ratio 

Grade Reports 43 

Grading System 42 

Graduate Degrees 13 



Graduate School 12 

Graduation 52 

Graduation Criteria 48 

Grants 56 

Grants-in-Aid (University 

and Athletic) 56 

Graphic Design 86 

Graphic Design Certificate 88 

Gymnasium 26 

H 

Hazardous Materials Certificate 147 

Health Services 23 

History Courses (HS) 204 

History, Department of 76 

History (of the University) 10 

Honors 49 

Honors Program 18 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Courses (HR) 202 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Program 132 

Hospitality and Tourism 130 

Housing, sec Residential Life 

Humanities Courses (HU) 206 

Human Services Courses 201 

I 

IEEE, see Institute of Electrical and 

Electronics Engineers 
HE, see Institute of Industrial Engineers 

Independent Study 41 

Industrial Engineering, 

Department of 124 

Industrial Engineering Courses (IE) . .206 

Industrial Fire Protection 147 

Information Protection and Security 

Certificate 141 

Insight 25 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics 

Engineers (IEEE) 124 

Institute of Gastronomy and 

Culinary Art 30, 134 

Institute of Industrial Engineers (HE), 

Student Chapter 123 

Institute of Law and 

Ptiblic Affairs, The 147 

Inicrior Design 86 

Interior Design Certificate 88 

International Business 103 

International Business Courses (IB) . .206 

International Services 23 

International Student Fee 50 



Index 282 



International Students, 

Admission Procedure 32 

Intersession Courses 35 

Intramural Programs (Sports) 25 

Investigative Services 138 

J-K 

Journalism Certificate 71, 98 

Journalism Courses (J) 209 

Juvenile and Family Justice 139 

L 

Laboratory Fees 52 

Lambda Pi Eta 96 

Late payment fees 51 

Law Enforcement Administration ... .139 
Law Enforcement Science 

Certificate 141 

Learning Resources, Center for 20 

Leave of Absence 46 

Legal Studies 144 

Liberal Studies, B.A 63 

Library, Marvin K. Peterson 28 

Literary Club 75 

Loans 57 

Logistics Certificate 125 

Logistics Courses (LG) 209 

Legal Studies Courses 210 

M 

Major 42 

Major, Changing a 46 

Make-up Policy 48 

Management Courses (MG) 217 

Management, Department of 99 

Management of Sports Industries . . . .100 

Manufacturing Systems 124 

Marine Biology 68 

Marine Biology Courses (MR) 221 

Marketing and Electronic Commerce .102 
Marketing and International Business, 

Department of 102 

Marketing Courses (MK) 219 

Mass Communication Certificate 97 

Mathematics Courses (M) 212 

Mathematics, Department of 77 

Matriculation 41 

Meal Plans 24, 52 

Measles 23 

Mechanical Engineering 

Courses (ME) 214 

Mechanical Engineering, 

Department of 127 



Mechanical Engineers, American Society 

of (Student Chapter) see ASME 
Medical Technology, see Clinical 

Laboratory Science 

Minor 42 

Minority Affairs, see Multicultural 

Affairs/Services 
Multicultural 

Affairs/Services 24 

Multimedia Courses (MM) 220 

Multimedia Studies 88 

Music 89 

Music Industry 90 

Music and Sound Recording 91 

Music Courses (MU) 222 



N 



Natural Sciences (Mathematics) 79 

New Students, Admission Procedure . . .31 
Newspaper (The Charger Bulletin) . . . .26 

o 

Occupational Safety and Health 153 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Administration 153 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Administration Certificate 155 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Courses (SH) 235 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Technology 154 

Off-Campus Activities 26 

Off-Campus Corporate Programs 36 

Organizations, Clubs and 26 

Overload Restrictions, Course 

Full-Time 34 

Part-Time and UNH-Southeastern .34 

P 

Paralegal Studies Certificate 147 

Parent Loans for Undergraduate 

Students 57 

Parking Permits 21 

Part-time Students 41 

Payments 34, 53 

Pell Grants 56 

Performing Arts, Department of Visual 

(and Philosophy) 85 

Perkins Loan Program 57 

Peterson Library, Marvin K 28 

Phi Alpha Theta 77 

Philosophy 80 

Philosophy (of the University) 10 



Philosophy Courses (PL) 230 

Physics Courses (PH) 228 

Physics, Department of 80 

Placement 33 

Placement, Advanced 39 

PLUS, see Parent Loans for 

Undergraduate Students 

Police, University 21 

Political Science Courses (PS) 221 

Political Science, Department 81 

Prearchitecture (Interior Design) 87 

Premedical/Predental/Preveterinary . . . .65 

Private Club Management 134 

Private Club Management Courses . . .227 

Private Security 139 

Private Security Certificate 141 

Probation and Dismissal 44 

Procedure, Dismissal/Readmission . . . .45 
Professional Studies, Department of . .147 

Proficiency Examination, Writing 49 

Programs of Study, Listing 6 

Programs, Major Aid (Financial) 56 

Provisional Admission 33 

Psi Chi Honor Society 83 

Psychology Club 83 

Psychology Courses (P) 224 

Psychology, Department of 82 

Public Affairs, The Institute 

of Law and 147 

Public Management 104 

Public Management Courses (PA) . . .226 
Public Policy (Campaign 

Management) 81 

Public Safety and Professional Studies, 

School of 138 

Publications (Student) 26 

a 

QPR/Quality Point Ratio 43 

Quality Systems 125 

Quantitative Analysis 104 

Quantitative Analysis Courses (QA) . .234 

R 

Radio, WNHU 26 

Readmission Procedure 45 

Refund Policy, Residence Hall 53 

Refund Policy, Tuition 53 

Registration 34 

Repetition of Work 44 

Research and Professional Facilities . . . .29 
Residence Hall Fee and 

Refiind Schedule 53 

Residency Requirement 48 



283 



Residential Life 24 

Room Fees 51 

Rubella 23 

Russian Courses (RU) 234 

s 

Satisfactory Progress 44 

Scholarships 56 

School, Graduate 12 

School of Business 92 

School of Engineering & 

Applied Science .* 104 

School of Hospitalit)' 

and Tourism (Tagliatela) 130 

School of Public Safety and 

Professional Studies 138 

Schools of the University 11 

Science Courses (SC) 235 

Security Act, Campus 14 

Seniors Program 58 

SEOG 56 

Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges 

(SOC) 37 

Services, Disability, Health, 

International) 23, 24 

Smoke- Free Policy 14 

Social Welfare Courses (SW) 238 

Sociology Courses (SO) 235 

Sociology, Department of 84 

Sororities, Fraternities and 26 

Sound Recording, Music and 90 

Southeastern Connecticut (UNH in). 

Calendar 268 

Southeastern Connecticut, UNH . . . .36 

Spanish Courses (SP) 238 

Special Programs 36 

Sports Industries, Management of . . .100 

Sports (Intramural and Varsity) 25 

Sports Spot 29 

SSL, see Stafford Student Loan 

Stafford Student Loans 57 

State Scholarships 57 

Statistics (Mathematics) 79 

Student Activities 24 

Student Center 29 

Student Employment 21, 57 

Student Government 26 

Student Loans 57 

Student Publications 26 

Student Right-to-Know and Campus 

Security Act 14 

Student Services 20, 21 

Student Status, Transfer of 

Full-time 42 

Part-time 42 



Summer Sessions 35 

Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grant 56 



T 

Tagliatela School of Hospitalit)' 

and Tourism 130 

Theatre Arts 89 

Theatre Arts Courses (T) 238 

Theatre Productions 87 

Tourism Administration Courses (TA) 239 
Tourism Administration Program . . . .134 

Transcripts 52 

Transfer Credit for Writing Courses . . .75 
Transfer of Credit from 

the University 47 

Transfer of Credit to the University . . .38 

Transfer of Student Status 42 

Transfer Students, Admission Procedure 31 

Tuition Differential 50 

Tuition Management Services 58 

Tuition Refund Policy 53 

Tuition, Fees and Expenses 50 

Tutoring, see Center for 

Learning Resources 

u 

Undergraduate Degrees 12 

Undergraduate Student Government 

Association 26 

UNH Foundation 29 

UNH Press/ Academic Publications ... .30 
UNH in Southeastern Connecticut . . .36 
University Advancement, Office of . . . .22 

University Core Curriculum 15 

University Grants-In-Aid 56 

University Philosophy 10 

Upsilon Sigma Alpha 130 

V 

Varsit)' Sports 25 

Victim Services Administration 139 

Visual Arts 85 

Visual and Performing Arts and 

Philosophy, Department ot 85 

w 

Ways oi Earning Credit 38 

Withdrawal from a Class 46 

Withdrawal from the University 47 



WNHU Radio 26 

Work, Repetition of 44 

Work-Study Program, College 58 

Worksheets, Academic 42 

Writing Proficiency Examination 49 



Y 



Yearbook (The Chariot) 26 



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UNIVERSITY OF 

NEW HAVEN 



OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE 

ADMISSIONS 

300 Orange Avenue 

West Haven, CT 06516 



We Make Tomorrow